#1
Why is it that many cartoons and toys feature an elemental theme of some sort?
Pokemon, Captain Planet, The Last Airbender, Harry Potter (to an extent, with the four houses), even those weird Lego robots. There are probably other examples.

I suppose it adds some sort of variety to allow the audience to choose a character that they identify with most. On the other hand, it could just be that the creators of the cartoons are too lazy to come up with new ideas, so they turn to ancient models of the Periodic Table for inspiration.

What does The Pit think?
#3
because it's more exciting and fantastical to be able to blast someone with fire or lighting or ice rather than to just go up and punch them in the face or hit them with a sword. also the idea of elements gives specialization: a fire-element character is easily capable of performing tasks an earth-element character is unable to do, and vice versa. in video games, this can be useful for puzzles or exploration (using an ice weapon to freeze water to make a bridge or using a fire weapon to melt ice and clear a path). and finally, in many cases different elements are able to create an effective system of strengths and weaknesses (some times in a rock-paper-scissors fashion), especially in video games (such as Pokemon, Final Fantasy, Metroid, or Fire Emblem), either adding strategy elements or making it easier to defeat certain enemies (such as in Metroid Prime).
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#4
Quote by theogonia777
because it's more exciting and fantastical to be able to blast someone with fire or lighting or ice rather than to just go up and punch them in the face or hit them with a sword. also the idea of elements gives specialization: a fire-element character is easily capable of performing tasks an earth-element character is unable to do, and vice versa. in video games, this can be useful for puzzles or exploration (using an ice weapon to freeze water to make a bridge or using a fire weapon to melt ice and clear a path). and finally, in many cases different elements are able to create an effective system of strengths and weaknesses (some times in a rock-paper-scissors fashion), especially in video games (such as Pokemon, Final Fantasy, Metroid, or Fire Emblem), either adding strategy elements or making it easier to defeat certain enemies (such as in Metroid Prime).


This. Plus it makes character appearances and personalities more distinct, which is especially useful in children's shows/movies. Like the fire elemental character will be red and short tempered or aggressive. Or anyone joining Slytherin will have black and green themes and will be evil
Last edited by D&DLover at Jul 28, 2011,
#6
The idea of having elementals is not really due to laziness, it is because, up to some extent, all these cartoons must have something incommon with the real word so that the viewer will get into it more quickly. They follow a basic rule of "if it's broken, don't try to fix it", basically, if they wanted to do something more than just a cartoon with characters who can control elements, they would have to think a little out of box, which would make it much harder, because if in a cartoon, 1 character can control an element, then there's at least a 100 more who can do the same, and actually, there are cartoons which don't evolve much of "element" themes, for example, superheroes. But because they can't control elements or be generalized, the creators are forced to think of unique super powers for every friggin' superhero out there, which very much limits the whole plot and the potential. Basically, it is a system that generalizes characters, like "good and evil", "skinny and fat" and all those, making totally unique characters would be very boring, because all of us humans share something in common. But all of this has nothing to do with the fact that. Yes. So, now you understand why are elemental themes so important. It is also because humans always want to be in control of the situation, so if they make a cartoon in which characters can control their environment in a fantasy-themed way up to perfection, then it would instantly attract tons of watchers because that is what we deeply desire.
#7
Quote by D&DLover
This. Plus it makes character appearances and personalities more distinct, which is especially useful in children's shows/movies. Like the fire elemental character will be red and short tempered or aggressive. Or anyone joining Slytherin will have black and green themes and will be evil


that too.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#12
Because if there's one thing that kids will always find awesome, it's being able to blast huge balls of fire or ice at mean kids who tease them.