#1
Here it goes, this might sound like a stupid question, but I've always wondered and I know UG will help me with it. When recording rhythm guitar and it then comes the time to double-track it, do you copy and paste the track and then pan left and right or do you re-record the same track? Hopefully, you all get what I mean, haha.
#2
I copy and paste and pan left/right. And that sounds fine by my standards. But I'm not sure if that's the right way to do it. Nobody told me either. You could try it both ways and see which sound you like better.

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B|--5--|
G|--7--|
D|--7--|x2586
A|--5--|
E|-----|


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#3
Re-record the same track and pan them. Remember, it doesn't always have to be hard left and right when you pan as well, it just depends on how wide you want the stereo image to sound. If you're too lazy to re-record the same part twice, or can't nail the part again, copying and pasting will work if, and only if, you nudge it forward in time a little. anywhere from about 5ms-50ms. A cool trick is to record the guitar part, pan it, send it to a mono delay with a delay time between 5ms-50ms set to one repeat, and have the delayed signal come back to a separate track/channel panned the opposite direction. Essentially gives the same result as the copy/paste method I mentioned.

That being said... Just record the part twice! It will sound better!
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#4
Quote by sloppyjoe24
I copy and paste and pan left/right. And that sounds fine by my standards. But I'm not sure if that's the right way to do it. Nobody told me either. You could try it both ways and see which sound you like better.


That will make no real difference, except maybe a slight volume change
Unless, like the guy below you said, moving it foward/backwards in time slightly. Which I've never thought sounds like a real double-tracked part to be honest, but it'll sound more like it than just a straight copy and paste.

Your best bet, by far is to just record it twice. Or even four times if you want a really big sound.
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Last edited by Carl6661 at Jul 28, 2011,
#5
Quote by Carl6661
That will basically make no difference
Unless, like the guy below you said, moving it foward/backwards in time slightly. Which I've never thought sounds like a real double-tracked part to be honest, but it'll sound more like it than just a straight copy and paste.

Your best bet, by far is to just record it twice. Or even four times if you want a really big sound.


If you mean that the chorusy warped sound that comes from lining them up together, I've never experienced that when copying and pasting. Literally, it sounds fine.

Q#m
e|--6--|
B|--5--|
G|--7--|
D|--7--|x2586
A|--5--|
E|-----|


Play until she breaks up with you.

The most brutal band to ever exist is...

You should go like them...even if you don't like them.


-Sloppyjoe24
#6
Quote by sloppyjoe24
If you mean that the chorusy warped sound that comes from lining them up together, I've never experienced that when copying and pasting. Literally, it sounds fine.

Yeah, he's saying it does sound fine. Too fine. The only difference from copy pasting is a slight volume change. The real benefit of physically recording the track two (or more) times is the little nuances in your playing, that will be separately heard from each speaker, giving it a true stereo effect.
#7
Ok, let's clear a few things up...

1) You could have just searched for this thread... there have already been several others asking the same thing, even in the months I've been a regular poster here.

2) Copy and pasting will do absolutely nothing except raise the volume... when you play something mono back on a stereo system, if it is panned centrally you have both speakers playing the same thing equally. If you copy two identical mono tracks and pan hard left/right, all you are doing is playing the same thing back, albeit using more CPU/RAM by having two identical tracks, and raising the volume by 3dB (which is the increase in volume of two identical parts at identical volumes, giving double the perceived volume).

3) The reason people double-track is because when you play through the second time, there will be slight differences in timing, tone and playing accuracy that will all amount to a slightly different signal which fills up the audio spectrum a bit better, and thickens out the sound by smearing the combined waveform to be a more complicated (and thus, more exciting to the ear in this case) sound.

4) Copy/pasting and then altering delays and stuff on tracks is also a completely different effect... all this will do is alter your stereo image and give the impression that the sound is coming louder from the side without the delay. You can actually utilise this space-creating effect on centrally-panned lead instruments (lead vox in choruses perhaps) to give a widening effect by taking two delayed tracks and panning one left, one right, before transposing one up and one down, and having one delayed more than the other. This gives the impression that the vocal is not just bang down the centre of the track but actually a larger place in the stereo field.
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Last edited by DisarmGoliath at Jul 28, 2011,
#8
Quote by DisarmGoliath
Ok, let's clear a few things up...

3) The reason people double-track is because when you play through the second time, there will be slight differences in timing, tone and playing accuracy that will all amount to a slightly different signal which fills up the audio spectrum a bit better, and thickens out the sound by smearing the combined waveform to be a more complicated (and thus, more exciting to the ear in this case) sound.


This. If you copy/paste/nudge, you dont get all those slight differences in tracks that hold the real magic. It's really the cheating way to go. A more professional way to look at it is you're going to have a crap load of phase problems if that track ever gets played in mono. Now before you go and say your track will never be played in mono, remember that once you post it the first time, you no longer have control of where that track goes (and yes, there are still plenty of places it could be played that are in mono). If people like it it could spread, but everyone that hears that copy/paste/nudge track in mono will hate it. That's the more professional way to look at it, but if you dont care about reaching any kind of large audience then at least keep in mind it sounds much more authentic and real if you re-record.
#9
Definitely re-record. That's why it's called double-track, you track (as in record) the part twice.
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#10
Quote by sloppyjoe24
If you mean that the chorusy warped sound that comes from lining them up together, I've never experienced that when copying and pasting. Literally, it sounds fine.

No, by panning the exact same part Left and Right, when aligned exactly the same, you basically make it a louder mono tracked panned to center.

It's passable if you nudge one track slightly ahead or behind the other (extremely small amount, otherwise it will sound like a delay), it might sound cleaner this way, but it will come out sounding bigger if you physically retrack each part.
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