#1
so ive seen a video of travis picking and basically all it was, was finger picking in a pattern wtih your thumb , index finger and middle. but the question is that can i make up a pattern and still be called travis picking or does it have to be a certian pattern in order for it to be travis picking?
#2
Does is it matter? I've never heard of Travis picking. If you're getting the sound you want, who cares what it's called unless they're getting royalties?
#3
its used for folklore and stuff but i found a patten to make it really dark and it could fit with metal, i love it but yah your right, in the end its the sound you want.

all it is is pretty much using a chord ( 4 note chords to be prefered) and using a pattern of the notes being played, i saw a youtube video and the guy should me certian patterns and i was thinking can i just make my own?


i still want to know if anyone can confirm this though.
Last edited by harvestkingx at Jul 28, 2011,
#4
There are no rules to guitar. We here recommend you avoid habits that will cause you injury, but there are no rules. Having looked at Travis picking, it really looks like a specific application of hybrid picking. If you want to take that pattern and modify it to make your own, there's no rule against it. You can use any technique at any time in any situation and no one can stop you. Music is free, man, so do what you want.
#5
lol ty and yah i dont like stuff like that to be too specfic cause theres too much rules and not enough freedom so i like to make my own, which is a reason why i stop learning songs, cause i felt like i never actually learned anything from it and i never felt happy playing it cause its not my own, hopefully when i udnerstand more theory i can take those songs and add my own twist to them...i cant wait lol x)
#6
travis picking I think is where your thumb plays an alternating bass (like if you're playing a C chord you could alternate the C on the A string and the E on the D string) then your fingers pick the melody on the high strings. It doesn't really matter if you are or aren't playing in travis, just play what you like. Travis is really good practice for syncopation and getting timing down and stuff though.
Last edited by bobbymcgee69 at Jul 28, 2011,
#7
Quote by Geldin
Does is it matter? I've never heard of Travis picking. If you're getting the sound you want, who cares what it's called unless they're getting royalties?

You must do little/no fingerpicking.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
#8
I don't do much fingerpicking, but having read a bit about it, I believe I answered his question. It's a specific application of fingerpicking or hybrid picking. If you change the specifics of the pattern, it's not that pattern anymore, hence it isn't travis picking.
#9
Quote by Geldin
I don't do much fingerpicking, but having read a bit about it, I believe I answered his question. It's a specific application of fingerpicking or hybrid picking. If you change the specifics of the pattern, it's not that pattern anymore, hence it isn't travis picking.

No, I know that. I'm just amazed that you've never heard of Travis picking before this. Merle Travis is kind of a legend among fingerpickers.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
#10
I dunno. I'm not really into his style of music. Having read about him and Chet Atkins and other fingerpickers, I'm very impressed and respectful of their skills, but that's a world I was completely uneducated in.
#11
So, how is this any different at all from fingerpicking? Thumb on the low E,A and D strings, and your other 3 fingers (excluding your pinky) play the G, B and e.

There is no difference at all that I can see. Therefore it's just fingerpicking but with some hick name?
#12
It's a very specific application. The pattern used in Travis picking is named for Merle Travis, who popularized its use. It is just fingerpicking, though I would hesitate to call guys like Travis hicks.
#13
You must get a thumbpick to play true Travis picking as he often plays more than one bass note to give a solid bottom end to his country grooves.

He very often frets the bass notes with his thumb aswell, and he picked the melody notes with his index finger.

You don't have to play it authentically like that of course, but it's just good to be aware of how he created his tone.

Two major country hits he wrote worth checking out are "Nine Pound hammer" and "Sixteen Tons".
Last edited by mdc at Jul 29, 2011,
#14
Most of you guys are likely too young to recall when "Travis picking" was pretty much what you did if you were a folk musician.
I started playing in 1976, and if you were doing solo guitar that's what was happening.

First, "Travis" picking has nothing to do with what Merle Travis did and no one really understands why this simple form of pattern picking became associated with him.
Travis was a sophisticated musician like Chet Atkins who indeed played fingerstyle but employed many advanced techniques and jazzy chords.
What became known as Travis picking is indeed just "pattern picking". Alternating bass with a somewhat-syncopated series of notes played either with or between the bass notes.

There is no specific pattern; the musician is free to develop whatever he likes and to vary it however he likes. Once you get a pattern down, it's pretty easy to embellish it by throwing in hammers and pulls, bass runs, and even single-note lines or "runs".
Here's a pretty clear video I found with a moment's searching:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6fqvEbkjBNQ

No, you don't need a thumbpick or fingerpicks, I don't use 'em. A thumbpick does let the bass notes stand out a little more.