#1
Hey guys i´ve got a quick question, or 2 really.

I really enjoy very melodic and well phrased players like Marco Sfgoli, Andy timmons (solo work), Joe satriani and Eric Johnson. Do you know any other guitarists that has that really melodic vibe to them like that that would be worth checking out? (Instrumental is preferd)

Also, what would you focus on practicing to get this kind of style into your playing, like these two guys.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tQ9OLp0JqEk&feature=mfu_in_order&list=UL

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uKJTYHIVnPE

I reckon there is alot of theory involved, but what in theory is it that i need to get a grip around?

Thanks.
#2
Jeff Beck, Michael Hedges, Jim Hall and Danny Gatton I believe all do different styles of real melodic instrumental music.
#3
As far as theory goes, knowing modes is a really good thing to have. People like Satch switch modes more often than I can count.

But what you have to do is be able to switch smoothly, and without it sounding like anything changed. Its not easy.
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#4
Also, what would you focus on practicing to get this kind of style into your playing, like these two guys.


Well, obviously, playing melodies is a good start.

To create your own stuff like that, you need to work on your ears, your knowledge of chord tones, and your bends and vibrato.
#5
chad has it. modes... also check out steve vai jason becker and marty friedman are just a few.
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#6
Modes are not the be-all-end-all of melodies, you know.

For example, Michael Schenker plays very melodically using mainly pentatonics.
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#7
Quote by Sleaze Disease
Modes are not the be-all-end-all of melodies, you know.

For example, Michael Schenker plays very melodically using mainly pentatonics.


modes are barely the start-all of melodies.

if you want a good sense of melody, check out some romantic-era classical compositions. listen to them and analyze what's going on. generally anything by brahms is a good bet, but there are many others.
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#8
Quote by chadreed32
As far as theory goes, knowing modes is a really good thing to have. People like Satch switch modes more often than I can count.

Modes are definitely not the answer. Modes are about the most over-hyped, least useful recommendations I've seen on this site (aside from a few "You need a new amp" jokes). Besides that, most melodic lines I've seen and heard aren't modal - they don't necessarily start on the tonic, but they are certainly tonal far more often than not.

TS, if you want to be a good melodic player, you need to internalize a bit of theory. Not "these notes make this scale" theory, but rather "this note played over this chord will yield this effect if I follow it with that note" kind of theory. You really need to have a sense of creating tension and release and be able to use that sense effectively. Most importantly, you need to be able to listen. Listen to each chord being played, listen to the notes you play, and listen to the melody in your head.

Then make that melody happen.
#9
Quote by Freepower
Well, obviously, playing melodies is a good start.

To create your own stuff like that, you need to work on your ears, your knowledge of chord tones, and your bends and vibrato.


Alright! I´m already working on my ears everyday so i guess that is a good start. By chord tones you mean like what notes make up wich chords so i can solo over chords? Like learn the notes in (example: minor) Dminor, Dminor7, Dminor11, Dminor13, Dminor9 and then do the same for the major, diminished and dominant ones? Going to work in my vibrato and bends aswell!

if you want a good sense of melody, check out some romantic-era classical compositions. listen to them and analyze what's going on. generally anything by brahms is a good bet, but there are many others.


That was great! Just sat down and went through some of his tunes, real melodic stuff. I´ll take some time in and learn that, luckly i just learned reading sheet music.

TS, if you want to be a good melodic player, you need to internalize a bit of theory. Not "these notes make this scale" theory, but rather "this note played over this chord will yield this effect if I follow it with that note" kind of theory. You really need to have a sense of creating tension and release and be able to use that sense effectively. Most importantly, you need to be able to listen. Listen to each chord being played, listen to the notes you play, and listen to the melody in your head.

Then make that melody happen.


Ah yeah, that will take tons of work. But it sure will help. I will start as soon i get my loop station fixed.
#10
Alexi Laiho. Probably a bit heavier, but definetly melodious.
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#12
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Alexi Laiho. Probably a bit heavier, but definetly melodious.


Bodom is my favorite band so i know, i was just think melodic in a more of hard rock style like in the videos. Since i do melodic death metal alot.

Im thinking more in the style of alex hutchlings.
#14
Check out Kiko Loureiro. He's also got some pretty cool instructional videos...or well..at least one - Creative Fusion.
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#15
The whistling theme melody to the "Andy Griffith Show"... once more, with feeling.

Knowing scales and modes is fine, but melody itself is an expression of feeling comprised of pitch, time, and phrasing.

Almost anyone can copy a melody, but feeling it is what matters.

There are a ton of guitarists who have chops... far fewer have a melodic sensibility.

Express the feeling of Gilmour's solo in "Comfortably Numb" or Santana playing "Europa" live on the Moonflower album... then make it your own.
End of quest.

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Last edited by Terry Gorle at Jul 29, 2011,
#17
It's knowing how to play and phrase in a way that moves people.
Taste varies from person to person of course, but here some that do it for me:
SRV
Satriani
Dickie Betts
Duane Allman
Wes Montgomery
Emily Remler
Jimmy Page
Mike Stern
Carlos Santana

that's a few just off the top of my head who made an impression on me with how they played.
Just find who moves you, and listen/learn.