#1
Ok basically, I've got this slide guitar that my uncle gave me. He had it for about 35 years. He said it was old as hell when he got it. It's got to be 50's or something like that.

Ive got no info on it at all. No branding or anything. On the inside of the case there's a stamp that says "GEIB".
I highly doubt anybody will get anything on this, but its worth a try.



It says, "GEIB". Above that is says Economo, below it it says Chicago. All I know is that that's the name of the case.

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Last edited by chadreed32 at Jul 28, 2011,
#3
wow thats awesome. i even think there are people who want pay maybe a few 100 bucks for it.
#4
I think its got a piezo, so it might have been out before the whole electromagnet thing.

Ive looked, and cant find a pickup anywhere. So im guessing its a piezo.
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#5
That's pretty cool looking. Must be a nightmare to play though. The neck looks pretty ****in' wide o.o
PSN - Boosted928
#6
Quote by boosted928
That's pretty cool looking. Must be a nightmare to play though. The neck looks pretty ****in' wide o.o




Its a slide guitar. It sits on your lap. You dont even put your hand around the neck.
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#7
Quote by chadreed32


Its a slide guitar. It sits on your lap. You dont even put your hand around the neck.

this...
Quote by pedromiles101
you're not gonna want to take a dump in a gross, off-colored, vintage toilet. you want something that is white and pearly; something that shines. something that you can put your cheeks against and say, "f*** yeah"
#8
it's a lap steel guitar (also known as a hawaiian guitar). looks like its from the 40s or early 50s but may be older. might be a National i can't tell for sure. does it work?
#9
Quote by monwobobbo
it's a lap steel guitar (also known as a hawaiian guitar). looks like its from the 40s or early 50s but may be older. might be a National i can't tell for sure. does it work?


I know its a lap steel, but I'm trying to figure stuff out... not easy
Sure does work. Its got the same strings its had on it for however many decades, and I don't want to change them because the machine crumble every time I touch them.
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Last edited by chadreed32 at Jul 28, 2011,
#10
He said it was old as hell when he got it? I would say that's more mid 1940's, then. The first lap steel guitar, the Frying Pan was created in 1931, and if it was already old when he had it for 35 years (guessing he got it 1986).

World War II was big for instruments, people needed things to make them happier, feel better... whatever the need.
#11
Looks like a Magnatone with the headstock decal missing. Late 40s or 50s perhaps. GEIB was the case manufacturer. Should have a single coil pickup under the protective cover. That's my best guess anyway. They changed a few things over the years, but the body and headstock shape remained constant, and that body shape says Magnatone, unless I miss my guess.
Various Strats
Polytone Mini Brute
Koch Studiotone XL
Swart STR Tweed
Quilter 101 Reverb and Mini
1958 National lap steel
Eastman El Rey 1
#12
Looks like a magnatone, I think you got it right.

And you up there... Reported..
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#13
If it's all original, the numbers on the pots might give you a clue as to the actual age.
Various Strats
Polytone Mini Brute
Koch Studiotone XL
Swart STR Tweed
Quilter 101 Reverb and Mini
1958 National lap steel
Eastman El Rey 1
#14
Quote by Vulcan
If it's all original, the numbers on the pots might give you a clue as to the actual age.


Ill have to open it up tomorrow then.
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#15
Opening the guitar and checking out the pots is the only place this will have any identification, I'm pretty sure it's a Magnatone as well.

You said the "machines crumble"? Are you referring to the knobs themselves? Ivoroid breaks down over the years and many vintage instruments have shrunk/distorted/broken knobs because of it. They're kind of a pain to remove from the tuner, but putting a new one on is pretty simple.

It's a nameless lap steel that you can't play because you can't tune it. Changing out the knobs would be a worthwhile investment, sure they wouldn't be original but if you can't play the instrument in it's current state... seems worth it to me. It doesn't have any tremendous value, so just as well make it a player.


EDIT: Somebody's a Steelers fan..
Endorsed by Dean Guitars 07-10
2003 Gibson Flying V w/ Moon Inlay
2006 Fender All-American Partscaster
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1964 Fender Vibro Champ
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[thread="1166208"]Gibsons Historic Designs[/thread]
Last edited by Flux'D at Jul 29, 2011,
#16
Quote by Flux'D
It doesn't have any tremendous value, so just as well make it a player.


I second this. Even name-brand vintage lapsteels don't have much value at all. Newer replacement parts can be had. Play it and enjoy it.
Various Strats
Polytone Mini Brute
Koch Studiotone XL
Swart STR Tweed
Quilter 101 Reverb and Mini
1958 National lap steel
Eastman El Rey 1
#17
Inside of the cavity. All pots are blank. .02 MFD cap, says Tiger on it and seems to be made by Cornell. Some other writing that I cant read aswell.
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