#1
i want to record my band for live setting. My plan right now is to use a Tascam dr-05 recorder hooked up to a shotgun mic to record the audio. then just a camera for the video. then editing on my computer. will this work well, or do you guys have better ways of doing this?
#2
Into the board.

The problem with being dependent on a room mic is that first of all a mic has its own eq and will color your sound. You will usually lose a lot of bottom end or if there is bottom end it will sound boomy and muffle the guitars and vocals, depending on the acoustics of the room you're playing in and how many people are there and how much noise they are making.

The best thing to do is to record off the board with separate channels for room mics. You can then mix the two together to get a "live sounding" end product.

Btw, most live albums released by major record companies get fixed in the studio to some extent. Parts even get totally re-done. Listen to the "Eagles Live" album. A lot of it is more Memorex than actual live performance.
#3
Depending on what you are expecting for quality and your purpose for recording, that will work fine.

We used a similar unit, a Zoom H2, to record our rehearsals, and the sound quality is really amazing for an all-in-one unit.

Quote by CrawlingHorror
Into the board.


... except he doesn't have a board that we know of....

And even if he did, I find that board mixes are generally terrible. The reason is that the vocals need the most amplification through the PA so they are VERY present in the board mix, and the drums need the least help, so they often sound off in the distance in a board mix.

Quote by CrawlingHorror

The problem with being dependent on a room mic is that first of all a mic has its own eq and will color your sound.


... just like all mics.... even the ones you will use for a board mix....

Quote by CrawlingHorror

You will usually lose a lot of bottom end or if there is bottom end it will sound boomy and muffle the guitars and vocals, depending on the acoustics of the room you're playing in and how many people are there and how much noise they are making.


Yes, and depending on the quality and type of mic. A small-diaphragm condensor as found in the Tascam unit should not exhibit these qualities unless the room itself or the mix itself are boomy and muffled.

Quote by CrawlingHorror

The best thing to do is to record off the board with separate channels for room mics. You can then mix the two together to get a "live sounding" end product.

Btw, most live albums released by major record companies get fixed in the studio to some extent. Parts even get totally re-done. Listen to the "Eagles Live" album. A lot of it is more Memorex than actual live performance.


Obviously, this can be done, but it is pretty elaborate. Depending on the purpose for recording, it may be unnecessary.

We did a live recording of one of our shows, and we did it "just like the pros" do it, only with NO overdubs.

Here is what we did:

We miked everything on stage, except the bass, which we ran direct through the PA. We had the drum kit miked, the guitars and all the vocals. We didn't necessarily use all the mics live through the PA, but we wanted them in the mix for recording, so we had to use them. Running condensors as drum overheads and then running them through the PA would be potentially problematic.

We set up each channel from the board with a direct out to the recorder. (used a Delta 1010). The direct out was set up pre-fader, so we controlled the amount of signal going from the board to the recorder by way of the input trim. This allowed us to use the fader on the board for adjusting the amount of signal going to the PA.

For instance, for those drum overheads.... the mic went to the board. We controlled the trim on the board to give us a good amount of signal going to the recorder, but kept the channel fader all the way down so it wouldn't cause feedback in the PA. Doing it this way also allowed the sound guy to adjust the faders for the live set, like turning down a guitar or turning up a vocal without affecting the amount of signal sent to the recorder.

We then took those tracks (I think we had ten direct outs from the board going to all ten ins on the Delta 1010, so we probably had something like:
-3 vocal mics
-bass was direct
-two guitars
-kick
-snare
-stereo overheads

The end result can be heard at www.now-here-this.com. There is an mp3 player in the left menu bar, and the live recordings are in there.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.