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#1
Some of this sounds like BS to me, but I used some software to test it and to modify the pitch on my music and it definitely sounds better at 432 then 440. Not ENORMOUSLY so but noticeably.

Course I'm using $250 headphones and a headphone amp so if you're on crappy speakers you might not notice much.

Anyways, decide for yourself.

To me 432 sounds more relaxing and "deeper" and 440 slightly more grating.

http://www.omega432.com/music.html

To try it out:

1. Download Foobar 1.0.1 Beta 1 at Download foobar2000 and optional components

2. Download Soundtouch 1.1 from http://acropolis.lokalen.org/2006/10/foobar2000/my-foobar2000-components/ once downloaded, extract the plugin to into Foobar's "Components" folder.

3.Next, open up Foobar and go to File>Preferences>Playback>DSP Manager, then move Soundtouch to the configuration column on the left.

4. Now configure Soundtouch and check mark "Pitch Adjust" then set it to -0.32 (Use you're arrow keys to get the exact adjustment)

5. You're done, move your music to Foobar and enjoy.
#4
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#5
@Zoot

I dunno man, I copy pasted those steps off some other dude's thread on another forum. If you wanna play it safe and really test it out I'd just install the other program, you can always get rid of it later.
#7
So you're telling me that every A note I hear in music is going to be 8 cents flat?

Screw you and your gypsy note tensioning. I prefer my music to be in tune.
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#8
TS looks like an ad bot, but from 2004?
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#9
Quote by WNxScythe
@Zoot

I dunno man, I copy pasted those steps off some other dude's thread on another forum. If you wanna play it safe and really test it out I'd just install the other program, you can always get rid of it later.

Yeah but it's got nothing to do with 440hertz, it would make the entire song slightly pitched down. You can't pitch down 1 note out of a song and have it ignore everything else or something.
#10
Quote by bastards
So you're telling me that every A note I hear in music is going to be 8 cents flat?

Screw you and your gypsy note tensioning. I prefer my music to be in tune.

The original stradovarius violins were tuned to 432 and apparently that's what was used back in teh classical era. So maybe you're listening to music 8 cents sharp?

Anyways, your choice if you wanna check it out. I'm skeptical about a lot of the stuff in that article but I definitely notice a (better) difference. It does not sound out of tune. It sounds smoother.
#11
Quote by WNxScythe
The original stradovarius violins were tuned to 432 and apparently that's what was used back in teh classical era. So maybe you're listening to music 8 cents sharp?

Anyways, your choice if you wanna check it out. I'm skeptical about a lot of the stuff in that article but I definitely notice a (better) difference. It does not sound out of tune. It sounds smoother.


A lot of people feel that the same things played in lower registers sounds better (a violin piece on a cello) so it kind of makes sense. Tune it down like a whole step or something and see how it sounds.
#12
I independently started doing the 432 Hz thing back in late '06 before I was aware of the quackery associated with it. My reason for switching was simply my enthusiasm for dozens, 432 being three gross. Two octaves above 432 is 1728, or 1000 in duodecimal.

Nowadays, I tune C 256, which makes 1 Hz an inaudible C.


Another dozenal option I considered was A 414.72, which is 12^7 cycles per solar day. 414.72 Hz is only 2.44 cents below Ab referenced from A 440.
#13
Quote by WNxScythe
The original stradovarius violins were tuned to 432 and apparently that's what was used back in teh classical era. So maybe you're listening to music 8 cents sharp?

Anyways, your choice if you wanna check it out. I'm skeptical about a lot of the stuff in that article but I definitely notice a (better) difference. It does not sound out of tune. It sounds smoother.

I'm pretty sure that instruments in the classical era were not entirely tuned to a specific frequency. Back then, nobody had any idea how to measure a frequency and the best thing people had back then to standardise tuning were tuning forks, which I'm pretty sure were not universally set to a specific frequency.
#14
Quote by rockingamer2
TS looks like an ad bot, but from 2004?

Maybe he waited. For us to gain his trust then one day...
To be vulnerable is needed most of all, if you intend to truly fall apart.


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#15
Quote by Dodeka
I independently started doing the 432 Hz thing back in late '06 before I was aware of the quackery associated with it. My reason for switching was simply my enthusiasm for dozens, 432 being three gross. Two octaves above 432 is 1728, or 1000 in duodecimal.

Nowadays, I tune C 256, which makes 1 Hz an inaudible C.


Another dozenal option I considered was A 414.72, which is 12^7 cycles per solar day. 414.72 Hz is only 2.44 cents below Ab referenced from A 440.

wat
#16
The average human ear can't tell a difference in pitch between 20 cents. So i've heard, can I get a reference on the strads?
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#17
Quote by Gorelord666
Maybe he waited. For us to gain his trust then one day...

I... I feel so violated, betrayed. I don't know what to believe anymore.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


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#20
I listened to the clips on the site


I think it's bullshit.
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#21
Nowadays, a lot of Baroque-period music is tuned to whatever they used back then. In addition to not being in twelve-tone equal temperament.

It sounds weird to modern ears, but they're trying to recreate the music as accurately as possible.
#22
That's going to piss people off that have perfect pitch. Possibly the resonant frequency of your ear canal may favor those frequencies more. But, that's like asking someone if E sounds better than G with no other reference.
#23
Yeah, I think tuning down any amount makes most things sound better. Sometimes I tune songs down 2 steps; that's the sweet spot for me.

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#24
Quote by ChemicalFire
I listened to the clips on the site


I think it's bullshit.


I listened to it to, although I can hear the difference in tuning, I also noticed that the piano was horribly out of tune, and the guy could not play the song correctly.
#25
Quote by Dodeka
I independently started doing the 432 Hz thing back in late '06 before I was aware of the quackery associated with it. My reason for switching was simply my enthusiasm for dozens, 432 being three gross. Two octaves above 432 is 1728, or 1000 in duodecimal.

Nowadays, I tune C 256, which makes 1 Hz an inaudible C.


Another dozenal option I considered was A 414.72, which is 12^7 cycles per solar day. 414.72 Hz is only 2.44 cents below Ab referenced from A 440.



That is the nerdiest thing I've seen in a long time. Bravo for your obsession to 12's!
#26
Quote by Fingerboy18
That's going to piss people off that have perfect pitch. Possibly the resonant frequency of your ear canal may favor those frequencies more. But, that's like asking someone if E sounds better than G with no other reference.

Yes, but the A440 standard is arbitrary. It's not really the note "A4," it's a pitch played at 440 Hz.

If someone with perfect pitch can't adjust to something other than the currently standard 12TET at A440, that's their own problem. Guess their pitch isn't so "perfect" after all.
#27
Quote by Zoot Allures
It's probably a myth based on the fact that tuning forks varied back in the old days.


It's only my guess, most people today aren't musicians. Hell I can barely tell the difference between quarter tones

I think perfect pitch is a sham. If you can match a pitch, so what, but I guaruntee you can't do much else. This is why guitar techs are guitar techs.
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#28
Quote by bastards
It's only my guess, most people today aren't musicians. Hell I can barely tell the difference between quarter tones

I think perfect pitch is a sham. If you can match a pitch, so what, but I guaruntee you can't do much else. This is why guitar techs are guitar techs.

How is it a sham? Some people can tell the pitch of note just by listening to with without an external reference.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


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#29
Quote by rockingamer2
How is it a sham? Some people can tell the pitch of note just by listening to with without an external reference.


I think some people just are more sensibly augmented than most others.

Augmented. Get it?

I crack me up
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#30
Quote by Holy Katana
Nowadays, a lot of Baroque-period music is tuned to whatever they used back then. In addition to not being in twelve-tone equal temperament.

It sounds weird to modern ears, but they're trying to recreate the music as accurately as possible.

How would being tuned slightly lower or higher sound weird? Many times ive had my guitar go out of tune and retuned it to itself, which is inevitably going to be higher or lower and it sounds fine.

Quote by Fingerboy18
That's going to piss people off that have perfect pitch. Possibly the resonant frequency of your ear canal may favor those frequencies more. But, that's like asking someone if E sounds better than G with no other reference.

Don't be silly, of course E sounds better than G.
Last edited by Zoot Allures at Jul 29, 2011,
#32
Quote by CoreysMonster
I'm pretty sure that instruments in the classical era were not entirely tuned to a specific frequency. Back then, nobody had any idea how to measure a frequency and the best thing people had back then to standardise tuning were tuning forks, which I'm pretty sure were not universally set to a specific frequency.


Actually it was common that the entire orchestra tuned to the oboe player(s). The result being that the "standard A pitch" was changing per country, per era, per orchestra even.

And I love experimenting with this kinda stuff.
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#33
Quote by GisleAune
Isn't the frequency increasing exponentially per octave?


Each A is doubled from the octave below it. The other notes are built around ratios.
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#34
Depends on the tuning system. Equal temperament usually isn't based on ratios, since the ratios themselves tend to have really big numbers over other really big numbers. With equal temperament, it's more a matter of slicing the octave into perfectly equal bits. But using ratios is how, say, just intonation would be intonated.

Quote by Zoot Allures
How would being tuned slightly lower or higher sound weird? Many times ive had my guitar go out of tune and retuned it to itself, which is inevitably going to be higher or lower and it sounds fine.


Don't be silly, of course E sounds better than G.

It's not just being tuned lower; it's the fact that it uses a different intonation system than we use today. It can be played (and sounds fine) in 12-tone equal temperament, but Baroque music was written to be played in one of several well temperaments, which sound a teensy bit different than 12-TET. Mainly because not all the notes are equally spaced, meaning that different keys could have different sounds, even more than how some people perceive that they do now.

Before well temperament, there was meantone temperament, and before that, there was just intonation, which really sounds odd to people who aren't accustomed to it. It sounds "out of tune," but really, it's actually tuned to ratios derived from the harmonic series, so you could make a case for it being more in tune.

But I think all tuning systems have their own benefits and drawbacks.
Last edited by Holy Katana at Jul 29, 2011,
#35
Quote by Holy Katana
Depends on the tuning system. Equal temperament usually isn't based on ratios, since the ratios themselves tend to have really big numbers over other really big numbers. With equal temperament, it's more a matter of slicing the octave into perfectly equal bits. But using ratios is how, say, just intonation would be intonated.


It's not just being tuned lower; it's the fact that it uses a different intonation system than we use today. It can be played (and sounds fine) in 12-tone equal temperament, but Baroque music was written to be played in one of several well temperaments, which sound a teensy bit different than 12-TET. Mainly because not all the notes are equally spaced, meaning that different keys could have different sounds, even more than how some people perceive that they do now.

Before well temperament, there was meantone temperament, and before that, there was just intonation, which really sounds odd to people who aren't accustomed to it. It sounds "out of tune," but really, it's actually tuned to ratios derived from the harmonic series, so you could make a case for it being more in tune..
But I think all tuning systems have their own benefits and drawbacks.

Had a listen to them on wikipedia, it's not 'that' different ,maybe in big peices of music it's more of a change to the overall sound.
#36
Autotune just got autof*cked
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#37
I just listened to the Silent Night samples on the website. I don't like 432Hz. It freaks me out. Seriously.
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#38
Ehh

"vibratory/oscillatory nature of the universe"

Could be real, but after that sentence I'm expecting healing crystals and homeopathy.

EDIT: I only really noticed a difference in the third clip. 432 hz did sound better, but the piece started in that tuning, and it's not surprising that changing the tuning mid-song sounded jarring. I am a skepticle.
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Last edited by whalepudding at Jul 29, 2011,
#39
A=432 sounds out of tune to me

Doing it with some other songs does add some maturity to it though, imo.
Last edited by RPGoof at Jul 29, 2011,
#40
Quote by RPGoof
A=432 sounds out of tune to me

Doing it with some other songs does add some maturity to it though, imo.


I felt it added a subtle hint of cedar.
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