#1
I thought it'd be a cool idea to make a data base of all the good mic positions people have found with certain mics with certain speakers, excluding cabs. I know it's not going to be exactly the same with every speaker, since no two speakers are exactly the same, but it'd give people an idea. If you can add sound clips to show as examples of how it sounds, that would be even better.

Just post what you can, and after this thread gathers enough information, I'll take all the posts and put them in a master thread.

I'll start.

Mic: SM-58(without the ball end)

Speaker: WGS(Warehouse Guitar Speakers) V-30

I've found two good positions so far.

45 degree angle, set near the cap edge, pointed at the center of the speaker, 2 inches away from the grill cloth. Gives a nice gritty, yet clear tone, but lacks some low end.

How it sounds: http://profile.ultimate-guitar.com/ethan_hanus/music/all/play1006312

Pointed straight on where the cone meets the cap, about 1 inch away. Gives a nice smooth, clear, punchy tone.

How it sounds: http://profile.ultimate-guitar.com/ethan_hanus/music/all/play1026521
#2
There's far too many factors aside from just the speaker going into it for the data to effectively translate.

Basically, build the rig for the tone you want and then if you're close miking, edge = bassy, center = trebly, in between = balanced, closer = possible proximity effect, further = more room ambiance and less proximity effect.

If you're using a condenser or something, experiment. /thread
Ibanez AS93
Fender Marauder
Vox Pathfinder 15R
#3
Quote by muso_catolico
There's far too many factors aside from just the speaker going into it for the data to effectively translate.

Basically, build the rig for the tone you want and then if you're close miking, edge = bassy, center = trebly, in between = balanced, closer = possible proximity effect, further = more room ambiance and less proximity effect.

If you're using a condenser or something, experiment. /thread


That's completely opposite with my speaker, edge is more trebly, more centered is more bassy.

Which is why I made this thread, no two speakers mic up the same, my B-52 cab speakers mic up much differently to my WGS V-30 speaker. Plus, most people who are starting out have no idea how to find that sweet spot, why not just tell them in a massive thread for the speaker and mic they are using?
#4
That's completely opposite with my speaker, edge is more trebly, more centered is more bassy.
That sounds unbelievable, unless the manufacturer learned how to defy physics.
Ibanez AS93
Fender Marauder
Vox Pathfinder 15R
#6
Quote by muso_catolico
That sounds unbelievable, unless the manufacturer learned how to defy physics.


Speakers don't mic the same, they never have, the same brand and model tend to mic the same, but outside of that, it varies, especially depending on the mic.

Go look at impulses, why do you think there are 5 billizion different micing positions with various mics of various cabs that sound nothing alike? Because speakers don't mic up the same outside of brand and model.
#7
Quote by ethan_hanus
Speakers don't mic the same, they never have, the same brand and model tend to mic the same, but outside of that, it varies, especially depending on the mic.

Go look at impulses, why do you think there are 5 billizion different micing positions with various mics of various cabs that sound nothing alike? Because speakers don't mic up the same outside of brand and model.



Speakers are made roughly the same as far as guitar cabinets go (there are other speaker types out there but I dont think many people here mic them). They all obey the laws of physics in the same way.

The reason they mic different is similar to why guitar amplifiers have EQs on them. Sometimes you want that amp to sound different to fit a different song. Each speaker is correctly miked no matter where the mic is as long as that's the sound that works for that part in that song, it's correct. Take my amp as an example. Peavey Classic 30 with stock speaker. Sometimes I like it close miked on axis dead center with a 57, and sometimes I like the mic a little off axis. Sometimes I've even moved the mic away from the center. Heck, sometimes I like a different mic or even 2 mics. Perhaps even back the mic of and/or add a room mic. The different mic positions all give me a "right" tone depending on what I want at the time. It comes down to what the song calls for and the artist's desires. That is why there is no "right" way to mic any instrument because every song calls for a different sound (for the most part).
#8
^ Exactly, but for a noob just looking for a good starting spot for micing, why not make a thread with a bunch of different mic positions for various speakers that get a good tone. There is a way to incorrectly mic up a speaker, I've done it, very thin, weak tone.

Stop thinking as a serious audio engineer, and think as a guy who can help get some inexperienced guys going in the right direction.
#9
If you have two dynamic mics, you can use the Fredman technique (or whatever the hell you wanna call it ), which is you position the first mic straight on at the speaker cone, and the second at a tangent to the cone (aka at a 45 degree angle to the grille pointed at the cone). Then you can blend the two mics however you please.



If you only have one mic, I find that micing it at a tangent to the cone gets a very balanced tone.
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Quote by theogonia777
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#10
Quote by ethan_hanus
Speakers don't mic the same, they never have, the same brand and model tend to mic the same, but outside of that, it varies, especially depending on the mic.

Go look at impulses, why do you think there are 5 billizion different micing positions with various mics of various cabs that sound nothing alike? Because speakers don't mic up the same outside of brand and model.
Undeniably, different mics and speakers will sound different and require a certain mike position for a certain situation; however, I was under the impression that all of these different speaker models, regardless of their own unique tones, all had one thing in common -- they are speakers with a voice coil, a cone, and a cap, and due to that similar design, they all follow the same rule of edge=less presence, center=more presence, when close miking, anyways.

I mean yeah, cars will drive differently from each other, but they all do the same thing -- put the stick here for forward, there for reverse. It's inherent to the design of the damn things.
Ibanez AS93
Fender Marauder
Vox Pathfinder 15R
#11
Most mics, except for some specialty ones, tend to be cardioid. That is they are roughly spherical in their pick-up pattern and basically deaf at 180 degrees. This is both a matter of design (because of cancellation) and intention as it is beneficial for cutting feedback live (or reducing bleed in a studio situation.)

The properties of cardioids are useful in many ways, but one of the most interesting is Proximity Effect, which is a tendency to boost the low-mid frequencies when placed close to a source.

The familiar example of PE is the classic used car or beer commercial: "COME ON DOWN TO JT'S FORD WHERE WE'RE FANATICAL ABOUT F-150 PICKUPS!!!" and so forth. You hear it all the time.

That's a guy with an SM58 basically eating the mic.

Usually it's a man because women's voices are higher and proximity does nothing for them.

That said if you have an instrument that does produce in the <200Hz range (bass to low mids) then you can use it to "EQ" the instrument by placing it ultra-close to the sound source. Live you might mic a standup bass at a few centimeters if all you've got is an SM57 - a vocal or snare mic, really - and you need to make it work. It will indeed respond more effectively to bass at a 2-3cm distance, less so with each cm you get away from the source.

I believe Prox effect is gone at 5-6cm, so it is a VERY close position.

Some death metal vocalists (the low ones) will bury the mic in their face when they do it. I don't like the sound much and prefer a Sennheiser 421 at a proper 6-8cm distance, but again if you don't have one and need to make a death growler sound good with a more basic dynamic mic, again Prox effect can help out. Just compress the crap out of it!
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