#2
G and D make a perfect fifth interval, or more commonly called a power chord. It just so happens that the opening chord is a G power chord. So in the case of that tab (awesome song, by the way), the G just means G5.

Without more context as to where the progression goes after F# diminished, it's hard to give tell what key it would definitely be in. However, it could be G major, since F# diminished is the triad built off the seventh degree of G major.
Last edited by stickfigurekill at Jul 29, 2011,
#3
If it's a G and C only, then it's not really a G chord. It's the top 2/3rds of a C power chord (C5sus4)

On the side note: The chord could also be an A, C, or Eb, depending on how you play it (all diminished btw)
Last edited by BrandonBeaux at Jul 29, 2011,
#4
Quote by harvestkingx
now im not fimliar with 9th chords or 6th to be excat but in this tab


http://tabs.ultimate-guitar.com/d/dio/rainbow_in_the_dark_tab.htm


the opening chord says G but its only using the notes G and C which dosent seem like a chord to me (to my knowledge)

Side note: lets saying im staring a song of with a F# diminshed, which key am i in?

Its using g & d which is a g5, a dyad which functions as a g major chord in this case. As for starting on f#dim there is no answer as we'd need to know the rest of the chords in the progression to determine the key.
#5
Quote by z4twenny
Its using g & d which is a g5, a dyad which functions as a g major chord in this case. As for starting on f#dim there is no answer as we'd need to know the rest of the chords in the progression to determine the key.


Exactly.

Remember that the chord that begins the phrase has no bearing on the key of the song. It's about functions rather than position, it just so happens that most popular songs either begin phrases or end them with the tonic.

The F#* has a strong resolution to G, which may be suggestive of the key, but F#* could easily be a secondary leading tone or otherwise borrowed into a different key.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#6
k ty . and yah sorry about the misdirection it is g and d lol my bad x) and also i was wondering on the sidenote cause i was using the Em key and theres a F# dimished and i uses it as the oopening to my song, just wondering if you can do that with diatonic traids.


so G & D are fifth chord , makes sense.
#7
k ty . and yah sorry about the misdirection it is g and d lol my bad x) and also i was wondering on the sidenote cause i was using the Em key and theres a F# dimished and i uses it as the oopening to my song, just wondering if you can do that with diatonic traids.


so G & D are fifth chord , makes sense.
#8
Quote by harvestkingx
k ty . and yah sorry about the misdirection it is g and d lol my bad x) and also i was wondering on the sidenote cause i was using the Em key and theres a F# dimished and i uses it as the oopening to my song, just wondering if you can do that with diatonic traids.


so G & D are fifth chord , makes sense.


commonly used term = power chord. (not 5th chord)
shred is gaudy music
#9
Quote by harvestkingx
i was using the Em key and theres a F# dimished and i uses it as the oopening to my song, just wondering if you can do that with diatonic traids.


Yes. Yes, you can.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#10
lol dont musian flip sh** when you say power chords but just so i dont mak another topic can anyone answer this, when making a 6th or 9th chord , can i use the same rules for the 7th chords to them.

just like a domiant 7th is made out of a major traid and a minor 7th


but if i were to make a domiant 6th or 9th, all i do is have a major traid and a minor 6th/9th right?
#11
Quote by harvestkingx
lol dont musian flip sh** when you say power chords but just so i dont mak another topic can anyone answer this, when making a 6th or 9th chord , can i use the same rules for the 7th chords to them.

just like a domiant 7th is made out of a major traid and a minor 7th


but if i were to make a domiant 6th or 9th, all i do is have a major traid and a minor 6th/9th right?


Don't know if I've heard of a dominant 6th chord. If so, I'm unfamiliar with it. But for a dominant 9th, you take a dominant 7th and add the ninth to it. For example, a C9 chord would be C E G Bb D. Hope that makes sense.
#12
oh wait so its major traid, 7th minor and a 9th minor in order to make a 9th domiant... lol wow


a minor major 9th is then a minor traid a major 7th and a major 9th ... wow lol
#13
There isn't a dominant 6th, just major 6th and minor 6th. Note that you use the major 6th for both 6th chords, you just alter the 3rd. So:

Bb6: Bb - D - F - G
Bbm6: Bb - Db - F - G

stickfigurekill has got it. Upper-level extensions take the quality of the 7th chord that they are added to. So:

G#9: G# - B# - D# - F# - A#
G#maj9: G# - B# - D# - Fx - A#
G#m9: G# - B - D# - F# - A#

Same goes with 11ths and 13ths.

EDIT:
Quote by harvestkingx
oh wait so its major traid, 7th minor and a 9th minor in order to make a 9th domiant... lol wow


For 9, 11 and 13 you use the major 9th, perfect 11th and major 13th unless otherwise stated--such as F7(b9).
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
Last edited by soviet_ska at Jul 29, 2011,
#14
There isn't a dominant 6th, just major 6th and minor 6th. Note that you use the major 6th for both 6th chords, you just alter the 3rd. So:

Bb6: Bb - D - F - G
Bbm6: Bb - Db - F - G

QUOTE]


o ok i get, but i just dont understand why you would keep a major 6th for a minor 6th lol but i believe your a music teacher if iam correct? so im not questioning you or anythng , just kind of werid.


Quote by soviet_ska



G#9: G# - B# - D# - F# - A#
G#maj9: G# - B# - D# - Fx - A#
G#m9: G# - B - D# - F# - A#

Same goes with 11ths and 13ths.

EDIT:

For 9, 11 and 13 you use the major 9th, perfect 11th and major 13th unless otherwise stated--such as F7(b9).


and so your always using the major 9th, no matter what it just you just change the 7th or the traid if needed?


and lets say that i do make an 11 and 13 , i just make a traid, a 7th, a 9th major , a prefect 11th and a major 13th to make a 13th chord? lol intresting
#15
Quote by harvestkingx
oh wait so its major traid, 7th minor and a 9th minor in order to make a 9th domiant... lol wow


a minor major 9th is then a minor traid a major 7th and a major 9th ... wow lol


Wow indeed, I don't think I've seen such patchwork theory since Liam

A 6th is a Major triad with a 6th

A ninth is a ninth regardless, the ninth of a Min9 and a Maj9 and a Dom 9 are the same note. The treatment of 7ths and 3rds make the chords different.

Best,

Sean
#17
Quote by harvestkingx
o ok i get, but i just dont understand why you would keep a major 6th for a minor 6th lol but i believe your a music teacher if iam correct? so im not questioning you or anythng , just kind of werid.


Haha, no I'm not a music teacher, but thank you for mistaking me for one.

6th chords are just extensions from a triad, just like the 9th et al. I talked about earlier. Think of them as 'add6' chords. 7ths are their own sort of breed, working in a different way.

Quote by harvestkingx

and so your always using the major 9th, no matter what it just you just change the 7th or the traid if needed?


Right, the 9th is generally just a note used for harmonic interest. As I said you can alter the 9th, but that will be specifically notated such as E7(b9) or Db7(#9).


Quote by harvestkingx
and lets say that i do make an 11 and 13 , i just make a traid, a 7th, a 9th major , a prefect 11th and a major 13th to make a 13th chord? lol intresting


Yes, that is a full 13th chord. Likewise you would use a seventh chord + 9 + 11 for 11ths.

However, the full chord is rarely spelled out like that. Notice that a maj13 uses all seven notes of its root's major scale. That gets a little too cluttered. For a better-sounding upper-extension chord, use a seventh chord and just throw on highest extension you want. The fifth is often removed for this same reason, leaving you with just the skeleton of an extended chord.

Bmaj13 would be B - D# - F# - A# - C# - E - G#,
but it's less muddy if you just use:
B - D# - F# - A# - G# or even B - D# - A# - G#
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#18
so 11ths and 13 exist, they just sound bad lol? but damn wouldnt those be the most impossible not mention major finger stretching to find 13th chords on a guitar lol?


oh and the reason why i thought you were a music teacher is because either your sean answer all my question when im on the musican side of the fourm lol, but if it wasnt for the fact that they make almost no money ( or from what ive heard) i would of said give it a try
Last edited by harvestkingx at Jul 29, 2011,
#19
Quote by harvestkingx
so 11ths and 13 exist, they just sound bad lol? but damn wouldnt those be the most impossible not mention major finger stretching to find 13th chords on a guitar lol?


Yeah, playing the full voicings would be difficult (a full 13th is impossible on a six-string!) Just use the skeletal voicings, you can still call them 11ths and 13ths and they work the same way.

Quote by harvestkingx

oh and the reason why i thought you were a music teacher is because either your sean answer all my question when im on the musican side of the fourm lol, but if it wasnt for the fact that they make almost no money ( or from what ive heard) i would of said give it a try


I'll bet Sean makes a fair bit of money... . I'd definitely love to teach. I could teach music theory pretty well, but teachers (outside of music schools) mostly teach to instruments. My technique and playing is still too sloppy and strained to teach someone guitar or piano properly, but I could run up and down theory all day.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#20
so a 9th major is 14 semitones right?


also do 9th chords have minor-major ,dimishied, half diminished, augment and etc or is just those three?
Last edited by harvestkingx at Jul 29, 2011,
#21
Quote by harvestkingx
so a 9th major is 14 semitones right?


also do 9th chords have minor-major ,dimishied, half diminished, augment and etc or is just those three?


Yes, a major 9th is 14 semitones, unless I'm counting wrong.
#22
Quote by stickfigurekill
Yes, a major 9th is 14 semitones, unless I'm counting wrong.


Yes, a.k.a. an octave above 2.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.