#1
Hey guys,
So i have an audition/interview for an awesome part time teaching position at a local music school coming up (a bunch of students every week, playing in a faculty combo for occasional function gigs and 3 recitals--which are recorded--each year), which I'd really like to get. I'm not really worried about the audition (im playing a tune ive known since last year, and learning a fairly easy one this week), or the interview, but I have no experience with the royal conservatory syllabus, which the school uses exclusively (as I live in the US and its not really used here), I would be teaching beginner and intermediate classical and all levels of electric guitar. Could someone who has experience with this curriculum tell me what its like, and what they have for classical guitar and jazz and rock? Like what it goes into at the various levels?
any help would be greatly appreciated.
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
#2
The Royal Conservatory syllabus has ten grades, and it is classical only.

Grade one is very elementary - simple melodies, etc. Grade six represents an intermediate player. By the time you get to grade 8, you're into pretty difficult repertoire. Grade ten is about as difficult as it gets. After grade ten, you can do your ARCT, which stands for Associate of the Royal Conservatory of Toronto.

To give you some idea, most university music programs expect at least grade eight pieces, or better. By the time you graduate a university program, you are playing grade ten pieces on a pretty regular basis.

Unfortunately, they sell their syllabus, which means they do not post it on line.

This is a grade 8 piece:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6iiVw9KSlb4

This is a grade 10 piece (don't be fooled by the first part... it's a very difficult piece)
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=4877710728748067045

The syllabus is divided into different lists - A, B, C, D - each representing a different period. So, for an examination, you would need to prepare contrasting pieces, so that would mean pieces from different lists. IIRC, A = renaissance, B = Baroque, C = classical, D = romantic/modern or something like that. It's been a while.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#3
ok cool man, thanks a lot.
i'd imagine ill learn more about it if i got the job, but i was wondering if i could find a bit of it online?
on an unrelated note, am i the only one whose kind of bothered by segovia's time and phrasing in that second video?
also, just for my own vanity, do you know what grade the brouwer etudes (aka the bulk of my classical rep) are?
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
#4
Quote by tehREALcaptain
ok cool man, thanks a lot.
i'd imagine ill learn more about it if i got the job, but i was wondering if i could find a bit of it online?


Because it is for sale, they make a point of not posting it on line. I remember searching a while back with no luck.

My print copy is the second edition from 1997.

Quote by tehREALcaptain

on an unrelated note, am i the only one whose kind of bothered by segovia's time and phrasing in that second video?


Nobody questions Segovia, mister. Nobody.

But really... most recorded versions of that have a more natural phrasing. I didn't play it like that either.

Quote by tehREALcaptain

also, just for my own vanity, do you know what grade the brouwer etudes (aka the bulk of my classical rep) are?


According to my print copy, I don't know if this is the same one, but I have:
Etudes simples - any ONE of #1, 2, or 4 (Grade 3)
Etudes simples - any ONE of # 5, 8, 14 (Grade 4)
Etudes simples - #3 (Grade 5)
Etudes simples - any ONE of #6, 7, 11, 13 (grade 6)
Etudes simples - #16, 17 (grade 7)
Estudios Sencillos - # 18, 20 (grade 8)
**nothing more listed for grades 9 or 10**

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#5
Segovia is considered a bit 'old fashioned' these days but he's a super-hero as far as guitar history goes. Strange, the music itself is 'old fashioned' to an extent but this is the whole thing with 'classical music' - a term which tries to stick about 500 years of music into ONE pigeon hole (whereas 'Metal' has about 60 sub-genres). The music is alive, and it gets re-interpreted and people become better and better players through history. Look at the whole 4-minute mile thing (or was it 3?), first it was a physical impossibility and then after one guy did it loads of others followed. These days there are loads of people who are brilliant players and the standard gets raised constantly. Segovia was the grand-daddy, though. No one could touch him in his day (except Barrios, and Segovia made sure no one heard about that guy).
Anyway, if you're doing a guitar teaching job and have to do beginner classical guys, I'd recommend you take some lessons yourself. The difference between 'classical guitar' and electric guitar is like the difference between piano and keyboard. They are TOTALLY different things, sure the notes are in the same place, but the technique is massively different and the expectations in terms of tone production and musicality are totally different. Not better or worse, just different. Different technique, different focus etc.
The term 'Classical', as it commonly gets used these days, encompasses 500 years of music including massive amounts of awesome pieces from composers who are still living. A 'Classical' player will usually be really familiar with pretty modern South American and Spanish music. It's an awesome thing to explore! And those Brouwer etudes are great! They are a great example of stuff shocks people when you tell them it's 'classical' music. Interestingly study no. 6 was used by Matt Bellamy of Muse as an intro to 'Unintended' when he played it live, and also was Randy Rhodes inspiration for the 'Diary of a Madman' intro. And CHORDS! Wow, if you thought jazz chords could twist your brain, check out some of the harmony in those things!
#6
Anyway, if you're doing a guitar teaching job and have to do beginner classical guys, I'd recommend you take some lessons yourself. The difference between 'classical guitar' and electric guitar is like the difference between piano and keyboard. They are TOTALLY different things, sure the notes are in the same place, but the technique is massively different and the expectations in terms of tone production and musicality are totally different. Not better or worse, just different. Different technique, different focus etc.



yeah, i've done 2 semesters of classical lessons, and i may well take one or two in august if i do get this job (or at least, watch all of sharon ibsin's youtube tutorials again). though my classical technique is pretty mediocre (however, i do understand the technique and posture well enough to teach a beginner--and i do understand music well enough to help them get interpret the score).

According to my print copy, I don't know if this is the same one, but I have:
Etudes simples - any ONE of #1, 2, or 4 (Grade 3)
Etudes simples - any ONE of # 5, 8, 14 (Grade 4)
Etudes simples - #3 (Grade 5)
Etudes simples - any ONE of #6, 7, 11, 13 (grade 6)
Etudes simples - #16, 17 (grade 7)
Estudios Sencillos - # 18, 20 (grade 8)
**nothing more listed for grades 9 or 10**


ok cool. thanks a lot.

Nobody questions Segovia, mister. Nobody.

But really... most recorded versions of that have a more natural phrasing. I didn't play it like that either.


yeah, i figured it also may be that as he got older his hands got less dextrous, which lead to some of the phrasing issues.
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
#7
Quote by tehREALcaptain

yeah, i figured it also may be that as he got older his hands got less dextrous, which lead to some of the phrasing issues.


Nah. He was playing concerts into his 90's. He just phrased it like that.

Here is a John Williams recording - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EPMXmPMcUGc

This is more in keeping with how I think the phrasing should go. Whereas Segovia is the "historical" legendary master, Williams is the "living" legendary master.

Unbelievable.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
Nah. He was playing concerts into his 90's. He just phrased it like that.

Here is a John Williams recording - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EPMXmPMcUGc

This is more in keeping with how I think the phrasing should go. Whereas Segovia is the "historical" legendary master, Williams is the "living" legendary master.

Unbelievable.

CT


ooh, i guess thats his perogitave then. John Williams is also ridiculous
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)