#1
Hello,

Has any of you experienced a difficulty in keeping time after playing so many songs.

I checked myself with a metronome and I really was surprised that after all this time, playing along to songs, I am not perfectly on time.

any advice on why this has happened?
#2
Well, if you play along to songs through headphones, you may be subconsciously following the drummer, rather than playing your "own" drumlines. Try playing to some drumless tracks, feeling out the music, and see if that helps. Also, one good way to try and work on timing, as much as I know it would suck, is to go play some more simple songs. Anything by AC/DC or White stripes, to really drill in your basic 4/4 timing.

Also, depending on what you've been playing, perhaps you're playing songs more difficult than your skill level, so you may be going off time trying to keep up?
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#3
Quote by Taerran
Well, if you play along to songs through headphones, you may be subconsciously following the drummer, rather than playing your "own" drumlines. Try playing to some drumless tracks, feeling out the music, and see if that helps. Also, one good way to try and work on timing, as much as I know it would suck, is to go play some more simple songs. Anything by AC/DC or White stripes, to really drill in your basic 4/4 timing.

Also, depending on what you've been playing, perhaps you're playing songs more difficult than your skill level, so you may be going off time trying to keep up?


That seems a possiblity. I am trying to up my skill level after playing just simple stuff like megadeth and such to Dream theater and death metal drummer caliber(haven't got the speed yet)

Thanks for the advice dude...looks like I have a date with the metronome again + simple songs again
#4
Well, depending on what you've been playing, and what you're into, I can suggest a couple songs if you like. Some of the most fun I've had playing drums is to some CKY, which is fairly simple.

Here's my current setlist, for fun. I change it up every so often to incorporate a range of styles.

Stare at the Sun - Thrice
Knights of Cydonia - Muse
Hard to See - 5FDP
Misery Business - Paramore
I will Not Bow - Breaking Benjamin
One Headlight - Wallflowers
Flowing - 311
Chop Suey - SOAD

Most of these are fairly easy, but they're fun to play (In my opinion) and have enough fills to keep it interesting, and a range of tempos to keep timing on.

If you're shooting for more difficult things, play along to simple songs, with one or two songs that are a step up. That way you're still drilling in timing, while challenging yourself to get better.
Days go on forever
But I have not left your side
We can chase the dark together
If you go then so will I
#6
Quote by gothblade
Hello,

Has any of you experienced a difficulty in keeping time after playing so many songs.

I checked myself with a metronome and I really was surprised that after all this time, playing along to songs, I am not perfectly on time.

any advice on why this has happened?
Not with a metronome though I practice literally everything with a metronome. For just playing along to a song though, I wouldn't really worry about playing every exact hit at the same time in the song. Wouldn't worry about using a click track live either honestly.

As for why it might have happened, I dunno really, you can't really "fix" time problems with anything other than just playing slower. Like I said though, you don't have to play exactly on time with a song, though being like, a beat or two behind is kind of drastic. Usually I have problems if I'm playing a fill that ends kind of weirdly, like with two notes on the bass drum and then going back into a skank/blast beat, that can be kind of off-putting at first.
#7
I'm not always in time either and I've been playing for three years. My practise habits have been off and on, but I've had a kit for a long time and have gained experience either way.

I recommend playing in a band. At the end of the day, playing in time is for the purpose of what? To sound tight in a band or in a studio session. Seeing as studio's don't demand you to play along to a metronome, it doesn't matter if you go off slightly as long as you stay in time with the band.

Listen to a classical piece of music from the early 20th Century where it's just a pianist and a cellist. They barely ever stay in time but they're always in time together. Playing exactly to a metronome isn't as dynamic as being free with the tempo and time signatures. That is why a lot of modern day shred music is so lifeless to me.

With that said, you shouldn't try and break the rules of time without first having a solid grasp of them. In which case I recommend buying a cheap keyboard from eBay that has a few drum samples and rhythms built in. Then set the tempo to something slower than you would normally practise at and just jam along. To make it more interesting, try and record a little melody over the top on your guitar.
#8
Follow Bryan Mantia's DVD, you'll become a timing god. He drills in the 2/4 snare, then develops it into awesome grooves.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fzos1uI2tmU

Watch the kids speed up before they have the groove, he tells them to really home in that groove before adding anything to it.
Always waiting for that bit of inspiration.
#9
Seeing as studio's don't demand you to play along to a metronome, it doesn't matter if you go off slightly as long as you stay in time with the band.


To be quite honest, I would be very surprised if a professional modern studio was happy to let you track drums without a click. Even if you're doing the whole band live.

I was at a Chad Wackerman clinic last week, and when asked if he usually did his studio work to a click he didn't even have to think to reply "Always."
#10
Yeah, you're right. Professional studios will question your band and your abilities if you refuse to play to a click track. For the benefit of the studio itself, they require you to be able to play to a click track.

But the studios that the regular UG user will have access to, most of them won't demand it but will certainly recommend it for all the reasons we've already mentioned.
#11
Personally, I would expect any drummer worth his salt to be able to play to a click. If they can't, they're not a very good drummer. Timekeeping is pretty much the skill that drummers need to have, you certainly can't get up to Megadeth/Dream Theatre levels without it.
#12
Quote by Freepower
Personally, I would expect any drummer worth his salt to be able to play to a click. If they can't, they're not a very good drummer. Timekeeping is pretty much the skill that drummers need to have, you certainly can't get up to Megadeth/Dream Theatre levels without it.
I don't agree with that.

Brann Dailor from Mastodon didn't actually use a click track, according to their DVD from Crack the Skye, until they introduced a new engineer to the album's production and recording. Brann had supposedly never played to a click track before. Of course, when the time came to do so, he could.

My old drummer isn't very good at playing to a click track, but could still drum well enough for the complicated and furious music the bassist and I wrote for him. And I'm not very good at playing to a click track either, but I'm still a decent drummer, for the music I play is slower and more "open".

It's like I said already, if you want to play Dream Theatre in a professional studio then, yes, you will need to play to a click track, as that is how the style of music works. But if you're playing Doom or Stoner Rock, for example, you don't. Most of those musicians perform in the studio live with a click track at the beginning so that the tempo is exactly how they want it. Otherwise it's just experience and knowledge of your band mates.

Drumming originally was used in ceremonies, in the military, and stuff like that, where the drummers were the metronomes. And I've never heard of orchestral percussionists using a metronome in a studio. They might use their training as a time keeper - that could have included practising along to metronome - but they don't rely on it to play well.
#13
The click issue seems to be a bit of a sticky subject here I'd say it always comes down to personal preference, some drummers just don't need it or don't want to. Others (like myself) do, and I hate playing without a metronome in the studio because I get paranoid that I will speed up or slow down. I do agree that every drummer should be able to play to a click if needed though.
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#14
Quote by AngryGoldfish
My old drummer isn't very good at playing to a click track, but could still drum well enough for the complicated and furious music the bassist and I wrote for him. And I'm not very good at playing to a click track either, but I'm still a decent drummer, for the music I play is slower and more "open".

It's like I said already, if you want to play Dream Theatre in a professional studio then, yes, you will need to play to a click track, as that is how the style of music works. But if you're playing Doom or Stoner Rock, for example, you don't. Most of those musicians perform in the studio live with a click track at the beginning so that the tempo is exactly how they want it. Otherwise it's just experience and knowledge of your band mates. .


I'm not saying I expect all drummers to play to or be recorded to a click - rather that I expect any good drummer to be able to. Personally it really bugs me when the drummer lets the tempo slide or rush.