#1
I started recording an album called "Tables and Chairs," mostly acoustic, trying to get the sounds of some of my influences like Good Old War, Anthony Green, and Ryan Adams. Most of the songs so far sound great and often have a fast-bluegrass sound or a mid-tempo happy-simple-flat-picking-filled pop type of sound. But I wanted a couple of the songs to have that slow, really quiet, acoustic, sad, empty quality that some Ryan Adams songs have. For some reason every time I try to write a song like that it either comes out all rennaissance-sounding or like "Bartering Lines," which isn't what I'm going for, I'm trying to sound more like "Call Me on Your Way Back Home" or "Oh my Sweet Carolina," but I cannot freaking do it! I transposed like half of "Heartbreaker" in one freaking night trying to figure out what makes it sound the way it does, its just a freak of nature! I'm one hundred percent lost, can anyone help me? Any tips at all on sad, acoustic songs would be nice...I know some qualities of these songs and have been using them (implying chords rather than playing them, hybrid picking with double stops, ascending parts once or twice in the song followed by a descending part and the main riff being repeated a few more times before the end), but it just doesn't work! I must be retarded or something!

Any tips and advice would be so greatly appreciated...
#2
Ryan Adams or Bryan Adams ?

I don't know any of the song you mentioned but keep in mind that :


Epic sad acoustic songs always have violin in the background providing the sad atmosphere.

Your guitar chords might be incredibly well fit for a sad song, but you don't feel it for that ridiculously small detail.
The symphonizer
#3
The best way to do it as far as I'm concerned is to just be REALLY REALLY sad at the time you are writing the song. So go get sad somehow.
#4
Quote by throwshapes
The best way to do it as far as I'm concerned is to just be REALLY REALLY sad at the time you are writing the song. So go get sad somehow.


That works..... BUT :

When you're acting, and you have a sad scene going, you're not really sad, but you bring up sad emotions through your act.

Same thing goes for music, you can always fake your emotions: get your sad emotions going through the music without being really sad.
The symphonizer
#5
Quote by TMVATDI
I started recording an album called "Tables and Chairs," mostly acoustic, trying to get the sounds of some of my influences like Good Old War, Anthony Green, and Ryan Adams. Most of the songs so far sound great and often have a fast-bluegrass sound or a mid-tempo happy-simple-flat-picking-filled pop type of sound. But I wanted a couple of the songs to have that slow, really quiet, acoustic, sad, empty quality that some Ryan Adams songs have. For some reason every time I try to write a song like that it either comes out all rennaissance-sounding or like "Bartering Lines," which isn't what I'm going for, I'm trying to sound more like "Call Me on Your Way Back Home" or "Oh my Sweet Carolina," but I cannot freaking do it! I transposed like half of "Heartbreaker" in one freaking night trying to figure out what makes it sound the way it does, its just a freak of nature! I'm one hundred percent lost, can anyone help me? Any tips at all on sad, acoustic songs would be nice...I know some qualities of these songs and have been using them (implying chords rather than playing them, hybrid picking with double stops, ascending parts once or twice in the song followed by a descending part and the main riff being repeated a few more times before the end), but it just doesn't work! I must be retarded or something!

Any tips and advice would be so greatly appreciated...


It takes time to absorb things. If you find a song you like.... then study it with the aim of getting it into your style.... and then go right to writing, you will likely fail because, while you've exposed yourself to the style, and might have learned to attach a few fancy words to it, you haven't allowed yourself the time it takes to absorb it. And It's more than just understanding it theoretically. You have to hear it, you have to feel it. Absorb ALL of that. (not just the fancy descriptions)

Then when it comes time to be creative, squeeze and see what comes out.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 30, 2011,
#6
If you want a dark empty sound.
You should do minor and as the word already says leave some spaces empty on the sheet.
Not just to sound lame but pauses give empty and dramatic feel to a minor piece.
#7
Quote by GuitarMunky
It takes time to absorb things. If you find a song you like.... then study it with the aim of getting it into your style.... and then go right to writing, you will likely fail because, while you've exposed yourself to the style, and might have learned to attach a few fancy words to it, you haven't allowed yourself the time it takes to absorb it. And It's more than just understanding it theoretically. You have to hear it, you have to feel it. Absorb ALL of that. (not just the fancy descriptions)

Then when it comes time to be creative, squeeze and see what comes out.

i think this one is the answer, i transposed songs from his album "heartbreaker" (RYAN by the way, NOT BRYAN, the canadian government has apologized for bryan adams on several occasions) and attempted to write songs like that all in one night, i guess if i had just let what i discovered settle for a while this would come easier.

i don't think not being sad is the problem, i can think about things and get pretty sad pretty easily, starving kids in africa and whatnot, i'm a pretty emotional guy.