#1
Whenever I play lead guitar or write lead riffs, I never play anything the same way twice. I always come up with some basic structure to each riff and then just improvise within that structure. So every time I perform one of my songs the riffs aren't the same as the previous time. Is there something wrong with doing that? I like it because it keeps me interested in what I'm playing, and it makes each performance unique and special, but is there a reason I should stop? Will this hurt in the future?
#2
No, in time you will be able to recall most if not all those licks you made up onvthe spot. Like when you go to write solos and stuff you can pull from yur bag of licks you have already. This is usually what mst ppl do neway.
#3
I almost always Improvise. Keep doing what you do bro. Like the previous poster said you will eventually remember ones you really like to play. Theres nothing wrong with learning something note for note(if thats your thing) but I agree that improv does make things feel special. Take Hendrix for example, he improvised a lot when playing live.
#4
Start recording yourself and "farm" the parts you like.
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#5
"Make sure you play the same thing each time, if your not playing the same thing each time your not going to learn anything"

What this means is, if your playing a riff, play it the same way each time, the same picking and the same notes. Otherwise you will never learn it. But once you have it down do whatever you want.
#6
ever see a classical performance? it takes an excellent performer to play that sort of thing, and it's never improvised -- and if it were, it'd be a travesty.

now obviously you're not playing classical music, and those same guidelines don't apply to you, but you get my drift. memory is a large part of music. if you're not memorizing anything, you're not learning anything. if you have no difficulty changing things up and improvising the way you do, then you can do it to a sufficient degree, which means you're not learning anything.

the best musicians can do both. the more you can do, the better off you are. simple as that.
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#7
I do the same exact thing.

Even guys like Leslie West and Ritchie Blackmore say they have terrible memories and can never remember how to play the same things twice.

Well, Leslie writes simple shit to help him remember, but otherwise, yeah.
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#8
Quote by AeolianWolf
ever see a classical performance? it takes an excellent performer to play that sort of thing, and it's never improvised -- and if it were, it'd be a travesty.

now obviously you're not playing classical music, and those same guidelines don't apply to you, but you get my drift. memory is a large part of music. if you're not memorizing anything, you're not learning anything. if you have no difficulty changing things up and improvising the way you do, then you can do it to a sufficient degree, which means you're not learning anything.

the best musicians can do both. the more you can do, the better off you are. simple as that.


On the contrary, I am learning a lot. My skills have improved a lot since I've started doing this. Why would the ability to improvise mean I'm not learning? I can memorize things. But I don't, because I like doing it my way. It's more organic. That doesn't mean I'm not learning. I don't think you know what you're talking about.
#9
i think thats awesome, and thats usually what i do when i have any creative control. but you should definatly learn how to learn parts, so if your in a situation where you can't just play what you want, you can play the right part. i find learning to sing a part usually imbeds it in my memory pretty well.
all the best.
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#10
Quote by TextOnTheScreen
On the contrary, I am learning a lot. My skills have improved a lot since I've started doing this. Why would the ability to improvise mean I'm not learning? I can memorize things. But I don't, because I like doing it my way. It's more organic. That doesn't mean I'm not learning. I don't think you know what you're talking about.

Aeolian knows exactly what he's talking about. I think you missed the point of what he was saying.

If you aren't memorizing music, you aren't learning them. You might have learned technical skills, but if you aren't committing songs or passages to memory, you aren't learning.

There is a lot to be said of improvisational skill, yes, but there is an equal amount to be said for being able to reproduce music from memory. In the world of classical music, there is very little room for improvisation, as the focus is usually on the composition as a whole as opposed to a single soloist.

You can go about doing things "your way", but realize that it isn't the better way. I believe that consistency is key to being a good musician, something which you have implied you haven't learned. Being able to make stuff up on the spot is great, but it is not in any way superior to being able to consistently and faithfully reproduce a piece of music from memory (and is actually in a lot of ways an inferior skill).
#11
How dare you not learn everything note for note!

I get what both of you are saying. I totally agree with what Aeolianwolf is saying about learning certain pieces. ANY memorable song you can think of you remember because of certain words or riffs that are played. Now, if they improvised EVERY aspect of the song ALL THE TIME then the song wouldn't be recognizable would it?

I get where Textonthescreen is coming from because again, I do a fair bit of improv myself. There is nothing like getting lost in the moment and just letting the notes flow. It really is an awesome experience. HOWEVER, you do have to maintain a certain balance with the two. Some songs you just cant play without those key pieces/riffs.

As far as composing or writing stuff, I find that if I improv something I like I record it IMMEDIATELY so I don't forget it. You don't want to forget something that could be you're next masterpiece.
Last edited by dopelope at Aug 1, 2011,
#12
Quote by Geldin
Aeolian knows exactly what he's talking about. I think you missed the point of what he was saying.

If you aren't memorizing music, you aren't learning them. You might have learned technical skills, but if you aren't committing songs or passages to memory, you aren't learning.

There is a lot to be said of improvisational skill, yes, but there is an equal amount to be said for being able to reproduce music from memory. In the world of classical music, there is very little room for improvisation, as the focus is usually on the composition as a whole as opposed to a single soloist.

You can go about doing things "your way", but realize that it isn't the better way. I believe that consistency is key to being a good musician, something which you have implied you haven't learned. Being able to make stuff up on the spot is great, but it is not in any way superior to being able to consistently and faithfully reproduce a piece of music from memory (and is actually in a lot of ways an inferior skill).


thank you.

functional musicians can do both. if you are restricted to one, you are lacking -- regardless of how you'd like to believe you're doing. if you want to become a good musician, then you have no room for limitations of any sort.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.