#1
Hey guys!
Whats the best way to practice synchronization between the two hands, when alternate picking? just super slow? or as fast as i can? :P
#2
Practice going slowly. Trying to play super fast when you aren't well synchronized isn't going to do you any favors.
#3
Slow, obviously. Once you can play accurately like that go a bit faster and so on. You should try practicing with a metronome.
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#4
well ofc i practice with a metronome. at speeds from 140bpm 16th notes, it sometimes is synchronized, and sometimes isnt. how should i practice?
im thinking on one string, and rly slow right?
#5
Quote by Ibarshall_X
well ofc i practice with a metronome. at speeds from 140bpm 16th notes, it sometimes is synchronized, and sometimes isnt. how should i practice?
im thinking on one string, and rly slow right?


You should practice on as many strings as the musical idea you're working on uses and ALWAYS at a speed where you can keep it consistently clean.

I've said this before in a different thread but:

There are no small mistakes when practicing, there's mistakes and not mistakes and any mistake is a big one.
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#6
^This. Seriously, guitar playing is like sex: you cannot rush it or things will end up bad.... Now, imagine yourself three years from now on - what would count more? Three years of controlled practice, or three years of constantly playing slightly above your technical max, causing you to nearly always sound a little sloppy?
Yeah
#7
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
You should practice on as many strings as the musical idea you're working on uses and ALWAYS at a speed where you can keep it consistently clean.

I've said this before in a different thread but:

There are no small mistakes when practicing, there's mistakes and not mistakes and any mistake is a big one.


The thing is, im trying to get my speed up on one string. It really helps with the speed on all strings too, really. When i play faster, i seem to use a little more elbow, so im kinda scared to practice very slowly, since the movement has to stay the same. or does it not matter?
#8
Do not use your elbow! You'll **** yourself up if you do, go as fast and as clean as you can, and when your confident about it, boot it up 5 bpm.
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#9
Quote by Ibarshall_X
The thing is, im trying to get my speed up on one string. It really helps with the speed on all strings too, really. When i play faster, i seem to use a little more elbow, so im kinda scared to practice very slowly, since the movement has to stay the same. or does it not matter?


I usually hate when people give these kinds of answers, but you should just not do those one string exercises while getting really technical about them. Maybe do them once in a while. They aren't really useful in a musical situation. And if youre worried about being in synch while doing them then you really need to just take a step back and work on some other songs or drills.
#10
Right, start very slow and speed it up. "The flight of the bumble bee" is a really great way to practice synchronization! Try it, it really helped me

When you play this fast, you play everything fast
#11
I'm getting really confused here
Today, i decided to learn a little alternate picking lick from Marco Sfogli - There's hope.

goes something like this

E |-14-14-15-12-14-15-14-12-18-14-15-18-15-14-18-14-15-18-15-14-19-15-18-19-18-15-19-15-18-19-18-15-|

at first i could do it at like 140bpm 16th notes. i experimented a little bit, then tried to add a little elbow, and now i can do it at 160 bpm. not every try is solid, but every try at 140 is solid. So how is a little elbow bad? it feels more comfortable too.

I practiced slow and fast, i did both 8th notes and 16th notes at 140bpm. and after practicing for a few hours, i actually felt like i didnt need to add the elbow to get the speed, with the elbow i can actually get up to 170bpm if i really push.
But that only on the 1 string lick

When crossing strings, i still am stuck in my 140bpm and its sloppy. so maybe i should practice like this with all my exercises, concentrating on an exercise per day and in the end going over all the exercises quikly so they wouldnt degenerate.

Also is it not a good idea to get myself up to speed on one string first, and then start adding strings?
#13
Quote by Ibarshall_X
I'm getting really confused here
Today, i decided to learn a little alternate picking lick from Marco Sfogli - There's hope.

goes something like this

E |-14-14-15-12-14-15-14-12-18-14-15-18-15-14-18-14-15-18-15-14-19-15-18-19-18-15-19-15-18-19-18-15-|

at first i could do it at like 140bpm 16th notes. i experimented a little bit, then tried to add a little elbow, and now i can do it at 160 bpm. not every try is solid, but every try at 140 is solid. So how is a little elbow bad? it feels more comfortable too.

I practiced slow and fast, i did both 8th notes and 16th notes at 140bpm. and after practicing for a few hours, i actually felt like i didnt need to add the elbow to get the speed, with the elbow i can actually get up to 170bpm if i really push.
But that only on the 1 string lick

When crossing strings, i still am stuck in my 140bpm and its sloppy. so maybe i should practice like this with all my exercises, concentrating on an exercise per day and in the end going over all the exercises quikly so they wouldnt degenerate.

Also is it not a good idea to get myself up to speed on one string first, and then start adding strings?


I'm a bit confused about your question at this point. Are you having trouble with synchronization or with your picking or both? But I remember Freepower once said doing your best exercise at top speed isn't the best way to go about things. And a one string lick is pretty much your top speed. Are you not able to do this lick at a fairly slower speed? because you might be more off than you believe. Higher speeds can cover up mistakes.
#14
Quote by alairson22
I'm a bit confused about your question at this point. Are you having trouble with synchronization or with your picking or both? But I remember Freepower once said doing your best exercise at top speed isn't the best way to go about things. And a one string lick is pretty much your top speed. Are you not able to do this lick at a fairly slower speed? because you might be more off than you believe. Higher speeds can cover up mistakes.



i can do that lick in any speed up to 160bpm and i did get alot of progress practicing that way. and when playing on one string is my top speed, why not increase my top speed by practicing on one string, and then catch up later with all strings.

and yes i have trouble with both, mostly picking
#15
Quote by Ibarshall_X
The thing is, im trying to get my speed up on one string. It really helps with the speed on all strings too, really. When i play faster, i seem to use a little more elbow, so im kinda scared to practice very slowly, since the movement has to stay the same. or does it not matter?



you said you were afraid to practice very slowly though
#17
Quote by Ibarshall_X
The thing is, im trying to get my speed up on one string. It really helps with the speed on all strings too, really. When i play faster, i seem to use a little more elbow, so im kinda scared to practice very slowly, since the movement has to stay the same. or does it not matter?


If you end up using your elbow without meaning too then your technique is not good enough to reach that speed without it and you're therefore trying to play faster than you're actually able to.

No, one string licks do not help, not in the real world. The weakest link in any given player's picking is almost certain to be string crossing and the challenges that represents. I can think of basically no music that will require you to pick only one string for veeeeeeery long and MAB and his "potential picking speed" is just bullshit.

Practice things across multiple strings, your playing and audiences will thank you for it.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


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#18
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
If you end up using your elbow without meaning too then your technique is not good enough to reach that speed without it and you're therefore trying to play faster than you're actually able to.

No, one string licks do not help, not in the real world. The weakest link in any given player's picking is almost certain to be string crossing and the challenges that represents. I can think of basically no music that will require you to pick only one string for veeeeeeery long and MAB and his "potential picking speed" is just bullshit.

Practice things across multiple strings, your playing and audiences will thank you for it.


potential picking speed is how fast you pick on one note, hell i can do that at 230bpm 16th notes. im talking about increasing the max speed on one string, not on one note, but with different patterns like

|5-7-9-5-7-9 , -9-7-5-9-7-5 , -9-5-7-9-7-5 , 5-7-9-7-5-7-9-7-| etc...

+ i have been practicing things across the strings for a million years, and have had no improvement im doing something wrong, or maybe not enough practice (maybe should do more than an hour or two for picking only, a day)
Last edited by Ibarshall_X at Jul 30, 2011,
#19
Quote by Ibarshall_X
+ i have been practicing things across the strings for a million years, and have had no improvement im doing something wrong, or maybe not enough practice

most likely one or the other (possibly both).
Try this: slow WAY down to a tempo where you can pick across strings perfectly in full control. Now practice at that tempo for 10-15 days straight for an hour a day, without even attempting to go any faster. You'll get more long term benefit from that than a 'million years' of whatever else you've been doing.

Seriously, teaching yourself to be a skilled alternate picker at faster temos takes years of work, and how you approach the beginning stages is crucial to how your development goes down the road.
Don't hesitate to go back and correct things if you're not getting anywhere.
#20
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr

No, one string licks do not help, not in the real world. The weakest link in any given player's picking is almost certain to be string crossing and the challenges that represents. I can think of basically no music that will require you to pick only one string for veeeeeeery long and MAB and his "potential picking speed" is just bullshit.

Practice things across multiple strings, your playing and audiences will thank you for it.


I've always kind of disagreed with this consensus around here, even against Freepower (I always feel like I'm gonna get struck by lightning when I do that though haha).

I think single-string licks and cross-string licks are equally as important. Part of it must be mental, but it used to be that given the bouncy nature of cross-string licks, I was able to cleanly pick those at higher tempos than I was comfortable picking single-string licks. It wasn't until I did focus on some single-string stuff (not ignoring cross-string stuff though) that I solved many of my issues.

While in an ideal world, your wrist motion is the exact same when you pick no matter what you are picking, this just isn't always the case. Moving your wrist up and out of multiple different strings requires a slightly different motion than remaining on a single string, and while logic might imply that would/should be more difficult than single-string licks (due to more complexity and overall more distance covered), I found it the reverse. That bouncy wrist motion from string to string made my playing more relaxed. I've since incorporated that what made my cross-string playing good into my single-string playing and my max clean speed is about equal between the two now, but it took some practice and analysation of both.

Maybe I'm just weird, but I have talked to some IRL friends about this and they seem to have experienced similar things at one point in their playing.

Just a thought.
Last edited by fixationdarknes at Jul 30, 2011,
#21
Quote by fixationdarknes
I've always kind of disagreed with this consensus around here, even against Freepower (I always feel like I'm gonna get struck by lightning when I do that though haha).

I think single-string licks and cross-string licks are equally as important. Part of it must be mental, but it used to be that given the bouncy nature of cross-string licks, I was able to cleanly pick those at higher tempos than I was comfortable picking single-string licks. It wasn't until I did focus on some single-string stuff (not ignoring cross-string stuff though) that I solved many of my issues.

While in an ideal world, your wrist motion is the exact same when you pick no matter what you are picking, this just isn't always the case. Moving your wrist up and out of multiple different strings requires a slightly different motion than remaining on a single string, and while logic might imply that would/should be more difficult than single-string licks (due to more complexity and overall more distance covered), I found it the reverse. That bouncy wrist motion from string to string made my playing more relaxed. I've since incorporated that what made my cross-string playing good into my single-string playing and my max clean speed is about equal between the two now, but it took some practice and analysation of both.

Maybe I'm just weird, but I have talked to some IRL friends about this and they seem to have experienced similar things at one point in their playing.

Just a thought.


I definitely believe they help. Sometimes I'll pick one single open string and work up to top speed until my technique breaks down. I think it really helps refining and ingraining my picking. But like I'll maybe do this once or twice for 20 minutes in a week.

The problem is some people seem to obsess over one exercise to do at top speed and believe that with that top speed, it will be applied to all other strings and licks, but the muscle memory is so much more specified than that.

If that guy would just absolutely master 5 licks with some other techniques at like a quarter of that speed it would be so much more efficient.
#23
To synch up your hands, it's best to play notes super slow, all over the fretboard, on all strings with all fingers. Listen very carefully to see if you're fretting first, picking first, or doing them exactly together. Correct any mistakes and pay close attention and it slowly cleans up your playing.

I've always kind of disagreed with this consensus around here, even against Freepower (I always feel like I'm gonna get struck by lightning when I do that though haha).

I think single-string licks and cross-string licks are equally as important. Part of it must be mental, but it used to be that given the bouncy nature of cross-string licks, I was able to cleanly pick those at higher tempos than I was comfortable picking single-string licks. It wasn't until I did focus on some single-string stuff (not ignoring cross-string stuff though) that I solved many of my issues.


ZZZZAAAP!

Actually I personally think single string licks are great and a valuable tool to synch up hands. When I start teaching picking with people I always start with long single string licks.

String crossing is harder but you can't cheat at all on single string licks - they show up when you've been getting lazy! (must go practice some now... )