#1
So I recently bought a new guitar a Gibson blood moon explorer (flame me how much you want for the name, I don't care) and great and cool looking guitar. But there is one problem, the high frets don't match with the low frets. For example if I tune my guitar perfectly and I play a high note the how note will be slightly lower than an octave lower. It's really bugging me a lot since you need to choose if you're going with a high fret tuning or a low fret tuning. I've played guitar for some time but I've never really worked with guitars that much, but does this have something with the truss rod to do? The floyd is set up perfectly so that should not be the problem.

Tl;dr
High frets are lower when the guitar is tuned right.

So please tell me what's wrong with it and what I can do to fix it. It would be much appreciated!
#5
Quote by Arby911
Thanks, I'll see what I can do about that. Although can I adjust these on a floyd without removing the strings?
#6
Quote by Leostereo
Thanks, I'll see what I can do about that. Although can I adjust these on a floyd without removing the strings?

Yes. I don't see how you would fix your intonation without a string to tune
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
#8
Quote by Flibo
Yes. I don't see how you would fix your intonation without a string to tune
Yes i know, but it feels like the tense of the string is going to mess everything up, and it's a bit tricky to reach with the string in the way. :/

Edit: Also just to be sure, if my strings are a bit flat, or low on the high frets I need to move the intonation thingys closer to the fretboard right?
Last edited by Leostereo at Jul 30, 2011,
#10
Quote by Sean0913
Leo take it to a shop, 99 percent chance that unless you follow someones step by step instruction somewhere (and get lucky) you're going to mess it up worse using a FR. This adjustment is waaaaaaay out of reach for you otherwise.

Sean
Guess that's a good idea, but I don't feel for paying 50$ if I can do it myself. I tried to adjust one string and it turned out quite good actually, but if the rest goes crap I will probably take it to a shop or something.
#11
I realized a new problem, my strings are still flat even though I moved the intonation thing as much as I can, what should I do?
#12
Quote by Leostereo
I realized a new problem, my strings are still flat even though I moved the intonation thing as much as I can, what should I do?


And now, you can see the wisdom firsthand of my suggestion. You know what to do... Hey I gotta give it to you, at least you gave it a shot.

$50.00 is Cheap if they do it right. I charge $75.00, for a full setup with intonation and I tell my customers how much I hate doing them. I even have all of the intonation Key Tools for each type of bridge (Took almost 3 years to find and accumulate them since they are no longer made and hard to find).

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Jul 30, 2011,
#13
Quote by Leostereo
I realized a new problem, my strings are still flat even though I moved the intonation thing as much as I can, what should I do?


Get out your wallet...
#14
Quote by Sean0913
And now, you can see the wisdom firsthand of my suggestion. You know what to do... Hey I gotta give it to you, at least you gave it a shot.

$50.00 is Cheap if they do it right. I charge $75.00, for a full setup with intonation and I tell my customers how much I hate doing them. I even have all of the intonation Key Tools for each type of bridge (Took almost 3 years to find and accumulate them since they are no longer made and hard to find).

Best,

Sean
May I ask what you would do if the intonations things had reached the limit they could go to the left (assuming that the guitar is not a lefty)? Is lowering(?) the whole floyd the only solution as it shortens the strings?


Quote by Arby911
Get out your wallet...

I want to learn as much as possible and see what I can do before considering getting real help.
Last edited by Leostereo at Jul 30, 2011,
#15
Quote by Leostereo
May I ask what you would do if the intonations things had reached the limit they could go to the left (assuming that the guitar is not a lefty)? Is lowering(?) the whole floyd the only solution as it shortens the strings?


I want to learn as much as possible and see what I can do before considering getting real help.


Most Floyd's have multiple holes for the intonation screw. Detune the string, loosen the screw, slide forward to next hole, intonate as normal.

Good luck.
#16
Quote by Arby911
Most Floyd's have multiple holes for the intonation screw. Detune the string, loosen the screw, slide forward to next hole, intonate as normal.

Good luck.
Yea I saw that in a video, though as far as I can see on my guitar it's on the far left step (I can't see if there's any more to the right but that doesn't matter). :/
#17
Quote by Leostereo
Yea I saw that in a video, though as far as I can see on my guitar it's on the far left step (I can't see if there's any more to the right but that doesn't matter). :/


Is the FR parallel to the strings?

If so, get the hence to a technician.
#18
Quote by Arby911
Is the FR parallel to the strings?

If so, get the hence to a technician.
It's parallel to the body as I heard it's supposed to be that way. Although if I raise it will move the strings further from the neck. And I don't want that.
#19
Bring it to the shop, pay the 50.00, stfu.

Or do it your self and **** the guitar up, wasting much more money.

I'd go with option 2 if I was ****ing moron also....