#1
This is a question that goes out to all those players that have achieved Petrucci/MichaelAngelo/Yngwie/Gilbert like speed. I recently came across an obstacle in a song that requires me to alternate pick across strings at a very high speed. Its nothing to complex just your basic Major Scale shredding. So my question is, how long did it take/how many hours did it take you until you were finally able to shred at high speeds comfortably? Im recently at around 130bpm in 16th notes and progress has been for me about+ 4-6 beats per hour. Is this the average progress because I feel like it should be going faster but something tells me this is the effort that its going to take. Im not one of those players that are obsessed with speed but harder instrumental songs sometimes require that you can play fast and thats what I'm trying to achieve. My arm is very comfortable and I feel no tension at all when picking from my wrist. Is this how hard it was for everybody to reach such high speed?
#3
To paraphrase StevenSeagull, guitar is the ultimate in diminishing returns. As you progress, it gets harder and harder to increase your technical skill by a certain degree.

In my experience, a lot of times when people hit a speed "barrier", it's due to technical limitations. The first thing I look at when I hit a barrier, wall, or plateau (or whatever else you call it) is how efficient my technique is. One problem a lot of people have is using too broad a stroke.

Look at really fast players - their hands barely move when they pick a note. That economy of motion makes a huge difference. When I practice picking, I focus on using minimally large pick strokes. Smaller pick strokes require less energy and are a less tense movement to make, provided you practice them slowly and fluently.
#4
Quote by MusicsMyHero
Im recently at around 130bpm in 16th notes and progress has been for me about+ 4-6 beats per hour. Is this the average progress because I feel like it should be going faster but something tells me this is the effort that its going to take.


Bro, if you kept up that progress, you'd be at 280 bpm 16th notes in 30 hours Do you really think that is slow progress? You should actually embrace this kind of progress and be glad it's going this quickly for you. Like above poster said, you can count on the fact that you will experience diminishing returns, just like everything else in life.

You will experience ups and downs, just like everything else in life. Ride them out. Keep asking questions, and keep doing what you know is right. And when in doubt about what is right, experiment!
Last edited by fixationdarknes at Jul 31, 2011,
#5
Thanks alot for the the advice guys. I will definitely focus more on using the economy of motion and I thank you for giving me greater knowledge on how the speed of progress normally goes. Also while I was waiting for replys on this post I've experienced even more of a diminishing return raising my time by only 2bpm in an hour instead of 4-6. I suppose Im just being greedy and impatient and didnt realise how quickly my progress has been compared to most peoples. I cant thank you guys enough for helping me realise this. Are there any more important things that I should know that could possibly help me in my quest to achieve speed?
#6
You're way too impatient - you can't develop the skills you're looking to in hours, days or even weeks...we're talking years here.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#7
You will probably get to a point where it will take you a year of practice to get 5% faster
#9
I find if you try to build up to much speed in one day and spend hours going from say 80bpm to 180bpm in one day, you will not be able to just pick up your guitar and do that 180bpm the next day, unless you build up all the way from 80bpm. You have to let it come gradually, let muscle memory do its thing and be patient.
#10
Quote by jkielq91
I find if you try to build up to much speed in one day and spend hours going from say 80bpm to 180bpm in one day, you will not be able to just pick up your guitar and do that 180bpm the next day, unless you build up all the way from 80bpm. You have to let it come gradually, let muscle memory do its thing and be patient.


I understand you completely. Thats happened to me way to many times. Like I said earlier I've just been way to impatient in my progress. That wont stop me from repeating the motion thousands of times a day though. I thank muscle memory for being such an amazing skill of the human body. No matter how many times I repeat something it will only benefit me.


Quote by steven seagull
You're way too impatient - you can't develop the skills you're looking to in hours, days or even weeks...we're talking years here.


Not that I'm disagreeing with being impatient. But that quote just inspired me to prove you wrong and I thank you for that. I usually get my best results that way whether I succeed or fail in the end it will only improve my skills. :]
Last edited by MusicsMyHero at Jul 31, 2011,
#11
Well if you're excepted from the realities that every other guitarist is beholden to then go for your life.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#12
Well your doing better than me, I can manage 200 BPM of 8th notes, which is a 100BPM of 16ths.
METAL!