#1
Whenever I sit down to practice, it'll usually go well for a while, than I'll make a mistake.
I'll usually try to correct it six times, but later on in practice I'll make another, than another, ect. I usually end up making anywhere between 5 - 10 mistakes per 1 hour. In the end I just get so depressed feeling like im getting worse, I'll fall asleep or go away and make myself feel better by playing games or watching TV.

How do you guys deal with mistakes in your practising? Not only how to prevent yourself from making them but how to move forward and keep practising well when you make them
#2
I CHALLENGE MYSELF TO THE FULLEST!


its called practice makes perfect, you are supposed to make misstakes
unless its a gig....
#3
Don't stop when you make a mistake... that's the worst you can do. If you are making too many mistakes, practice at a slower speed. If it's a song, maybe try a slightly easier song first.

Anyway, mistakes are natural. Don't feel bad.
#4
If I make a mistake...I got back and correct it in isolation and then in context a few times. My teacher's rule of thumb is that if you can play something perfectly 10 times in a row (at any speed - by slowly would be preferable I guess) then chances of you making a mistake at that perticular lick/riff etc. is reduced by quite a lot. It is the pursuit of perfection.
#5
Some techniques take longer to nail than others. It's just the nature of the beast. It's like how some hitters have no trouble with the curve ball but perhaps initially struggle with the slider or cutter before they learn to adjust the way they respond to it.

The first thing you should do if you are having trouble nailing one particular passage or technique is to just not play at all for a day. Sometimes your brain just needs time to wire your hands to do what you want them to.

Also, lots of scale work is so essential to making one more accurate and creating coordination and dexterity. So warm up by doing some scales (I change the scale I use for my warmup every day) for 15 minutes or so, starting slowly at first and then gradually working up to speed.

After that, go to the passage you're having trouble with and do that slow enough so that you aren't making a mistake. Then while using a metronome, gradually up your speed. You also need to keep your lefthand limp, perpendicular to the fretboard with as little of the palm touching it as possible and keep your picking hand relaxed while breathing normally (some people hold their breath when they reach a passage that gives them trouble, which throws your body's entire rhythm off).

After working on that for an hour, go work on some other facet of playing, whether it is another song or picking exercises or even if it is just part of a solo that may be above your current technical ability and do that for 30 minutes or so. Again, work on it slowly. Crosstraining and gradually extending yourself is definitely helpful to one's development.
#6
I just usually cut myself a little.
Gear:

Guitars: Ibanez SV5470F, Ibanez Xpt700, Fender MIM Standard Stratocaster ('04-'05), Jackson Ps-2
Ashton AG200,
Amps: ENGL E530, Bugera 6262-212,
FX: TC Electronics G-major 2, Behringer EQ700, Morley Volume / Wah
#7
I go to a music college and we do live performance work shops each week, perform a different song live each time which we learn over the course of the week. The biggest thing I had to get over in this class is not to dwell on mistakes. I had to learn that if I make a mistake I have to instantly forget about it and keep going, because every one makes mistakes. I saw a video on youtube where Jeff Beck made a really stand out mistake, but it didn't even look like he noticed because he recovered from it so smoothly.
Last edited by jkielq91 at Jul 31, 2011,
#8
Quote by The^Unforgiven
I just usually cut myself a little.


Pretty much this.


But really, being able to make a mistake and keep going is just as valuable of a skill as playing perfectly live. What makes your missed note more noticeable - missing it for half a second, or stopping, going back, and replaying that passage while the rest of the band keeps going or, even worse, tries to keep up with you? You're bound to make a mistake at some point - being able to plow through is necessary unless you plan on sticking to your bedroom.
modes are a social construct
#9
Quote by Frankeer
it's called practice makes perfect, you are supposed to make mistakes
unless it's a gig....


And even then it doesn't matter that much imo. Even the professional players make mistakes live, I think that is what gives a gig more feeling. Unless it's a really big mistake of course.

Remember kids: Once is a mistake, twice is Jazz!
"Don’t be a guitarist. Be a musician."

Steve Howe
#10
Just carry on, then if you are practising play the song again afterwards... dont stop because the when you perform live your natural reaction will be to stop. B.B. King once said that if he makes a mistake live he repeats that mistake every time he plays the lick so that noone knows its a mistake!
#11
Whenever I make a mistake while practising I immediately stop and try to analyze why did I do that mistake, then slow the hell down and practise that section. Obviously if I were playing live I wouldn't stop when I make a mistake, I'd just carry on.
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
#13
the key to correcting mistakes is speed. Never ever go faster then you can. If you begin making mistakes, slow down.

Think about it like a golf swing. Whenever I **** up a golf shot, if I just say to myself "okay, slow down, focus, relax, and shorten everything (backswing, etc.)" then I'm fine. But if I say "Wtf? I'm gonna kill this next one just to prove I can" I **** up... everysingle time. I approach practicing music the exact same way.

The other key is not only to recognize that you're making mistakes, but why. The best remedy for this is a teacher, but you want to develop your ability to do this by yourself over time.


also.......... **** golf....... **** it **** it **** it!
Last edited by nmitchell076 at Jul 31, 2011,
#15
When you make a mistake whilst practicing, immediately stop and analyze what you did wrong and what you need to do to NOT make that mistake.

The problem is, contrary to popular belief, practice does NOT make perfect, PROPER practice makes perfect. If you practice doing it wrong, all you will accomplish is getting very good at doing it very bad...

All too often people will make a mistake, and then immediately go back and without changing anything, try to do it again. They usually make the same mistake, so they go back again etc etc...

Once is a mistake, twice is an error in judgement, three times is a habit.
#16
i correct them. if i find im no longer able to focus and play things well, i take a break.
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
#17
Quote by jesse music
Whenever I sit down to practice, it'll usually go well for a while, than I'll make a mistake.
I'll usually try to correct it six times, but later on in practice I'll make another, than another, ect. I usually end up making anywhere between 5 - 10 mistakes per 1 hour. In the end I just get so depressed feeling like im getting worse, I'll fall asleep or go away and make myself feel better by playing games or watching TV.

How do you guys deal with mistakes in your practising? Not only how to prevent yourself from making them but how to move forward and keep practising well when you make them


stop counting mistakes!.


Notice btw, that I didn't say ignore mistakes. Every time you practice the piece you have a new opportunity to correct them. Sometimes you may need to isolate a section and work on a specific issue. If your working too hard, to the point were you're burnt and doing more harm than good....... take a break and come back later. With enough practice you'll get the song down. The progress is generally gradual at 1st, but the more you play the quicker the process will be. Also It's important to work on things that are realistic for you. otherwise you just end up frustrated and get nowhere.

Focus on the progress, and have fun.

put it this way...
If you could play it perfect in the 1st place you wouldn't need to practice it. Practice is where you work out the bugs so that you can ultimately play it.

So I suggest that you give yourself a break and allow yourself the time it takes to develop your skills. If you're stressing about mistakes, your not having fun, and if your not having fun, you're likely treading water at best. Just know that making mistakes is part of learning anything. Get over it and enjoy doing that thing you chose to do.


Quote by jkielq91
Practising is the right place to be making mistakes..


^ Well said
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 31, 2011,
#18
I generally stop what I'm practicing if I the same mistake more than once and just practice playing that part of the song correctly then go back to playing the full song, hopefully without the mistake. You just kind of have to weed out any mistakes that keep happening, but if its a one off just keep playing.
It didn't take long to realise
The safest place was not her arms, but her eyes
Where she can't see you
For her gaze, it blisters;
Grey skin to cinders
#19
misakes are good,thats how i come up with my own stuff,also like the other eople say dont stop playing just keep at it.
#20
Only 10 mistakes an hour! Your doing well! A mistake is anything you never intended as you hear it in your head. Practice turning mistakes into something good.. Unexpected mistakes can take what you are playing to a whole other place.
Andy
#22
I typically go back and practice the part I make the mistake on so I'm less likely to make it in the future. If I keep making the same mistake, I'll just put down the guitar, walk away from it for a couple of minutes, then go back and try again. Sometimes you just have to give your fingers a break.
#24
There is no such thing as a mistake... think of it as an opportunity for a short avant garde jazz exploration and enjoy.
Last edited by Terry Gorle at Aug 2, 2011,
#26
What I do when I'm playing a series of scales of some kind of technique practice is if I make a mistake repeat the passage or section over again several times (not stopping, simply finishing the particular part, then repeating) continue, and then the entire peice again until I perform it flawlessly
Quote by Night
wtf is a selfie? is that like, touching yourself or something?