Poll: Do You Like Your Country's Folkore?
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View poll results: Do You Like Your Country's Folkore?
Yes
19 37%
No
8 16%
Some stories are good
16 31%
It doesn't have any
8 16%
Voters: 51.
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#2
I don't know many folk tales of Sweden. The sami people might be one. I guess.
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#3
There really aren't many for the USA being a young country and all.
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#4
Yes, I'm very amused by things like "supply side economics"
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#6
yes, a giant called finn macool got into a fight with a giant in scotland so he threw a huge lump of earth at him but he missed and it landed in the sea and formed the isle of man. The hole where the earth was became lough neagh, the largest lake in the british isles. He then created the giants causeway, a formation of perfectly straight sided hexagonal, pentagonal etc etc sided rocks which stretches under the sea to scotland so he could walk over to fight him. Irish legends are awesome.
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#7
All we have is sasquatch
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#9
I very much enjoy Australian Folklore indeed. Whether it be the Great Snake of Wadigarudooie or the Cork Rimmed Hat Bandit of Bagaradaga, it's all very exciting stuff.
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#11
The Japanese have some really twisted fairy tales, much bloodier than anything the Brothers Grimm put out.

The U.S. tales are rather boring compared to any of that.
#12
we have the curse of the black sh!te,also know as the guinness revenge
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#14
Quote by Eggmond
we have the curse of the black sh!te,also know as the guinness revenge

And something to do with Swans
#15
Quote by LostLegion
And something to do with Swans

Irish folklore is crazy Fun to hear though.
#16
Quote by StewieSwan
There really aren't many for the USA being a young country and all.


Paul Bunyan (sp?)
John Henry


We got some
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#17
Quote by The_Seventh_Sin
Paul Bunyan (sp?)
John Henry


We got some



I said there aren't many.
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#18
Wouldn't you Americans have Native American folklore? No?

Can't really think of many for Aussies..
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#21
Yes, quite much. We have pretty interesting and colourful creatures, stories and legends. Trolls, fairies, humans, näcken, giants, serpents, lyktgubben are quite common creatures, depicted by the artist John Bauer they become a vivid part of your imagination.









If you've ever been to a Swedish "urskog" (originforest directly translated), you'll see where he got the inspiration from. There's a special kind of smell, light and sound in these forests. It's eerily quiet, and the slightest sound echoes, like a woodpecker many trees away. The ground is covered in a thick layer of a deeper shade of green to light blue moss. The trees have all the branches at the top and it's full of large, gray stones, covered with this moss.







Quote by Funky_Fresh91
Wouldn't you Americans have Native American folklore? No?

Can't really think of many for Aussies..

Just another thing they'd steal from the native americans...
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#22
The stories in themselves are ok. It's just when people make religions out of them that it gets irritating.

What's funny is the old people who actually believe in the Ramayana and the Mahabharat and all those other things. Like, they actually believe in them.
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#23
I just looked up Mexican Folklore despite living in the States.
I just found these from what I remember hearing from my mom and dad.

La Llorana (The Crying Lady)- She threw her kids into the Rio Grande to please her male suitor and they drowned. He left her so she searches the waters of south texas and northern Mexico to find her kids and takes kids that are there after night fall.

El Chupacabra (The Goatsucker)- This is supposed to be like a hairless dog that sucks the blood out of goats and other livestock and farm animals and leaves no blood in the corpses, but leaves the corpses unmangled.

La Lachusa (The Owl)- This is supposed to be like a bird woman. It is supposed to be like the body of a giant owl with the head of a woman. And if you whistle at night she will whistle back and try to locate you to scratch your eyes out.
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#24
Quote by Kensai
Yes, quite much. We have pretty interesting and colourful creatures, stories and legends. Trolls, fairies, humans, näcken, giants, serpents, lyktgubben are quite common creatures, depicted by the artist John Bauer they become a vivid part of your imagination.


are they like the nackers we have in irish culture? sorta like thieving pirates but they roam over land rather than sea
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#25
Quote by Eggmond
are they like the nackers we have in irish culture? sorta like thieving pirates but they roam over land rather than sea

Close in name, but Näcken is a creature, or rather a man, that plays the violin in the nude near watercourses. He lures the victims, usually women, in with his music then drowns them when they get to close.

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#27
Quote by Kensai
Close in name, but Näcken is a creature, or rather a man, that plays the violin in the nude near watercourses. He lures the victims, usually women, in with his music then drowns them when they get to close.



yea irish nackers are as much creatures are they are men.they live at roadsides usually and they venture out at night in groups to pillage the land speaking a strange tongue known as kant
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#28
Quote by StewieSwan
There really aren't many for the USA being a young country and all.



There is when you look back at Native American folklore. There are some great stories from the various groups that lived here before Europeans came and fucked shit up.
#29
Quote by Eggmond
are they like the nackers we have in irish culture? sorta like thieving pirates but they roam over land rather than sea

#30
There is a lot of native American folklore: Kachina's, Maiden of the mist, etc... There is one website with over 1500 myths and legends.

I put that folklore right up there with the Celts for creativity and originality but maybe not so much in terms of longevity or popularity.
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#31
Most folk stories here are pretty much just ghost stories. But they're actually really creepy. I don't really believe in ghosts but I still get scared when I hear them.
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#32
Quote by Spartan101400
Sure we do, such as "Richard Nixon and the Tapes"


Or "The black man who lived in the white house."
Last edited by WaterGod at Jul 31, 2011,
#34






Some neat shit, but it's all closely tied in with Irish and Scandinavian folk stuff.
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#37
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Kelpies.
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#38
Quote by Eggmond
yea irish nackers are as much creatures are they are men.they live at roadsides usually and they venture out at night in groups to pillage the land speaking a strange tongue known as kant


#39
Quote by daytripper75
There is when you look back at Native American folklore. There are some great stories from the various groups that lived here before Europeans came and fucked shit up.



Yeah but who talks about/knows about Native American folklore besides traditional Native Americans?
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#40
Quote by Gorelord666
La Llorana (The Crying Lady)- She threw her kids into the Rio Grande to please her male suitor and they drowned. He left her so she searches the waters of south texas and northern Mexico to find her kids and takes kids that are there after night fall.


You're doing it wrong, man. You're supposed to go into the bathroom, turn off all the lights, and say "la llorona" three times while staring into the mirror so that she'll appear to you!

Also, as far as American folklore goes, we've got a giant lumberjack with a blue bull. Pretty much it.

Depending on where you grow up, you'll hear more Mexican folklore anyways. I grew up in Arizona, southern California, and El Paso, TX and I heard a lot more about the chupacabra and la llorona than I did about Paul Bunyan and other American folklore.
Last edited by madbasslover at Jul 31, 2011,
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