#1
I play drums with a guitarist. We've been putting together some complete guitar rhythms/songs. We want to start working with a bassist, lead guitarist and singer, but we don't want people coming in, learning our material and then leaving with it only for it possibly to be recorded by someone else one day.

How do you guys handle this?

What options are there for protecting our music?

Thanks
#2
hey maybe it's smart to really get to know these people, so you know you can thrust them
and it might be also safe to just play and write material with them first, cause then if they try to screw you you can also screw them by using their numbers...
#3
Quote by Headphonehead
hey maybe it's smart to really get to know these people, so you know you can thrust them
and it might be also safe to just play and write material with them first, cause then if they try to screw you you can also screw them by using their numbers...


Its always a good idea to thrust someone you know.
Quote by JD Close
Piano dick had some good parts, but should have said "As the business man slowly gets boned", would have accented the whole dick feeling of the album
#6
Well you could always record the songs yourself first. That is more of a "soft" copyright, though. While not legally copyrighted, if you record something, show it to someone who doesn't stay in the band, and then two years later you hear that song on the radio, you at least have some sort of proof that it was originally written by you if you were to take it to court.

The only other way is to actually send a recorded copy of your song(s) to the government to have it legally copyrighted, and it costs money. If you are still in the planning stages of forming a band, I wouldn't go that far yet.