#1
so theres a long and mcquad at my area and i was thinking i be better canceling my lay away off my flying v and get the classical guitar instead, so i was looking at the website and thought this looks like a good one for my range


http://www.long-mcquade.com/products/1555/Guitars/Classical/Almansa/Classical_Guitar_Cedar_Mahogany.htm

or this one

http://www.long-mcquade.com/products/1563/Guitars/Classical/Almansa/Classical_Guitar_Cedar_Mahogany.htm


there te same company, but i have no experince on which classical guitar would be better lol, im gueseing the expensive one is, but i wanna see if theres a major difference in them, that way i can save 40$ if it isnt nessary.
#2
My old classical guitar teacher laughed at me when I came to a lesson with a long and mcquade classical. But then again, he was playing a 10k$ guitar, and all his other students had hand built spanish guitars that ranged from 1500$ to 2000$. I got to play some of them a few times, way easier to play than the thing I got from long and mcquade. And there probably won't be a difference in quality. 40$ is nothing in the land of music. I had to raise the nut on the lapatrie I got from Long and Mcquade, you'll probably have to do the same.
#3
lol but im only 15 im lucky i can get a job, i cant even make 1500 throughout the whole 2 month of the summer, but thanks for the advice, lol but my classical teacher is from long and mcquad lol hes the only classical teacher in the whole damn area so hes the only option i have lol.


thanks for the advice tho
Last edited by harvestkingx at Jul 31, 2011,
#4
Unless you actually want to play classical, or latin music, there's no reason to get a classic, nylon string guitar. To start with one sounds like parental influence. The techniques do translate to more contemporary playing, sure, but will you be motivated to practice? About the only thing that you will gain going to classic is the ability to read music.

That being said, a more expensive classic will definitely have better tone, and will have its place in some more contemporary music later on, but be aware that most are shipped with a slightly high saddle, and consequently high action. Make sure they agree to set it up when you buy it.
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#5
im going to classical cause i want to learn classical techinques the right way, i like them and i do want to learn to read music, i dont get how reading music is only thing i will gain, whens theres some techniques in classical that are awesome like for example, tremolo pickng with fingers, sounds pretty awesome to me i want to learn that. and theres probalby some others stuff more i want to learn.
#6
Quote by Vulcan
Unless you actually want to play classical, or latin music, there's no reason to get a classic, nylon string guitar. To start with one sounds like parental influence. The techniques do translate to more contemporary playing, sure, but will you be motivated to practice? About the only thing that you will gain going to classic is the ability to read music.

That being said, a more expensive classic will definitely have better tone, and will have its place in some more contemporary music later on, but be aware that most are shipped with a slightly high saddle, and consequently high action. Make sure they agree to set it up when you buy it.


"The only thing to gain from studying classical guitar is learning to read music".... Dude, you have a lot to learn, do some research before you start talking.
#8
Quote by jcp72
"The only thing to gain from studying classical guitar is learning to read music".... Dude, you have a lot to learn, do some research before you start talking.


My comment was based on the fact that classical studies stress reading music from the start, whereas other styles of guitar tend not to stress that as heavily. Learning to read music is a good thing, but not a reason to study a style that someone may not be interested in. Since I can guarantee I've been playing music far longer than you've been alive, I would suggest a less insulting tone.
PRS SC245
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Quilter OD200, 101 Reverb and Mini
1958 National lap steel
Eastman El Rey 1
#9
Quote by Vulcan
My comment was based on the fact that classical studies stress reading music from the start, whereas other styles of guitar tend not to stress that as heavily. Learning to read music is a good thing, but not a reason to study a style that someone may not be interested in. Since I can guarantee I've been playing music far longer than you've been alive, I would suggest a less insulting tone.



Your years of experience must put you on another level to us if you tell the TS they'll gain nothing but the ability to read music.

As someone who alleges to be far more experienced, you of all people should recognise that there are things to be learnt from all styles of music, especially when training with a classical technique.

All this 'I've been playing longer therefore I know more and I am the authority on music' attitude from self-proclaimed maestros is the lamest bullshit I've ever heard.

I wouldn't have a problem with it if your statements backed up your 'experience' but when your point is inconsistent, you're just yet another stuck up 'expert'
#10
Quote by XianXiuHong


I wouldn't have a problem with it if your statements backed up your 'experience' but when your point is inconsistent, you're just yet another stuck up 'expert'

Did you actually read the first part of my original post, or just the sentence you took out of context? If you did read it, please explain your objections to it.

Apparently the OP has now clarified that he indeed wouldn't mind the music itself, so my original arguments have been rendered moot in this case anyway. I can't count the number of young people I've seen over the years pick up the guitar, start to learn classical (because their parents say that's what the have to start with), then drop the guitar entirely because they feel no connection to the music itself.

Classically-developed right and left hand techniques are wonderful to have, but most take quite a while to develop, as well as consistent help from an instructor to develop them properly.
PRS SC245
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1958 National lap steel
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#11
Quote by Vulcan
My comment was based on the fact that classical studies stress reading music from the start, whereas other styles of guitar tend not to stress that as heavily. Learning to read music is a good thing, but not a reason to study a style that someone may not be interested in. Since I can guarantee I've been playing music far longer than you've been alive, I would suggest a less insulting tone.


Of course, if one dislikes classical guitar sound and music, one should not learn classical only to learn to read music.

"....not a reason to learn a style that someone may not be interested iin"

Of course, agreed, as I stated above.

However--why do you assume that the OP is not interested in classical guitar, that it must be "parental influence", etc? Aren't you making a lot of assumptions?

You very clearly do not like classical guitar, and have no interest in learning it yourself. You should not assume,. however. that others feel the same.

There is another reason why it might be good to start with a nylon-stringed guitar, besides whether one likes classical guitar or not. It is much easier on the left-hand fingers, to start with nylon rather than steel. That said, the wider width of a full-size classical guitar neck can be more difficult for the fingers. If one is not playing classical guitar music, but would like nylon strings, perhaps better to get one of the nylon stringed folk guitars, or put nylon strings on a guitar made for steel strings (I think one can do that, although certainly not the opposite!), or get a 3/4 or 7/8 size classical guitar, rather than full-size.

But not good to make assumptions, that no one likes classical guitar playing, and that someone wants to start with classical only to learn to read music, or only because his parents told him to start with classical.
#12
Quote by maikii

You very clearly do not like classical guitar, and have no interest in learning it yourself. You should not assume,. however. that others feel the same.


You are wrong. I'm quite proficient. A look at my sig would have revealed I have a reasonable classic in my collection. Whenever a young person says they want to learn classical, questions must be asked. I did not assume he did not like it, I was merely trying to establish his reasons for wanting to do so. They were solid enough. Done.
PRS SC245
Various Strats
Polytone Mini Brute
Koch Studiotone XL
Quilter OD200, 101 Reverb and Mini
1958 National lap steel
Eastman El Rey 1