#1
Hey, I'm pretty satisfied with my songwriting right now. But at the moment I'm just a guitar player. I really want to learn more instruments so I figured I'd start with learning to play bass. Any recommendations on what kind to get? Advice on amps would be cool too.
#2
Take a look at the FAQ at the top of the forum. Its an excellent resource to start with. IF you have any questions after reading it, post back in this thread.
#3
If you picking it up specifically to widen your understanding and make yourself a better songwriter, you might go for an instrument other than bass. Bass yields some important insights into songwriting, but it takes a lot of time, IME, for people to become familiar enough with the instrument to be able to incorporate them well.

Drums or piano will get you much more mileage as a songwriter/composer in the short term.

If that's not what you're after and you just want to pick up bass because it's awesome (and of course it is!) then do as suggested and head to the FAQ.
#4
FAQ wasn't much help. Gave me nothing on what I was posting for, just how to use the website. Anyhoo, to dullsilver_mike, I'm headed to college. I plan on taking a course in piano, and even choir so I can learn to sing. Currently I'm on the waiting list for both.
In the meantime, I feel a strong urge to learn something new that will contribute to my playing (not talking about scales, don't suggest it). Don't have enough space for drums, though I would like to try that someday. So I'm goin' for bass.
Now, back to the original question. Help?
#5
You'll need to give us more information than just that you're interested in learning. What genre's are you interested in playing, how much do you have to spend, who are some bass players that catch you ear?

As far as what I can tell you about bass, its really a mindset more than anything else. I'm sure as a guitarist you could already play most basslines, obviously there are extreme technical basslines and what not that require extreme practice and time spent with the instrument, but there are other lines that are easily learned and not so easily mastered, and I mean this in the sense of playing the correct note and the right time with the right tone with the right intensity with the right inflection on the right part of the beat with the right intentions.

There's always a reason a great band has the specific bass player they do.
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#6
One of the problems in answering the question is that so many people will have differing opinions, some of which directly contradict each other. I fumbled in the dark as a guitarist trying to learn bass several years ago. I can pass on some information that was valid for me. Might not be valid for others.

Assuming that you want to continue playing guitar while learning bass, I suggest you start with a decent, inexpensive short scale bass. Many bass-only musicians like long scale basses, but they're not switching back and forth between bass and guitar. The switch back and forth is much easier with a short scale bass, IMHO. I started out with a long-scale bass but made much faster progress when I switched to a short scale bass.

Start out using flatwound strings. Lets you break the fingering and fretting technique(s) into two parts. Get to where you can fret flatwounds cleanly first, then tackle roundwounds with their squeakiness later.

Don't worry too much about your first bass. Use it as a learning tool to get a better picture of what you want your second bass to be, and then buy a nice second bass when you know what you want. Conversely, if your first bass is not too expensive and you decide to give up bassin', you won't have much money in that first bass.

Although any number of beginner's basses will fill the bill, here's a recommendation for a first bass, the Squier Jaguar Special Short Scale. It's $170 delivered to your door, has both a Precision and Jazz pickup, so it's very versatile sound-wise, and has a nice fast neck. Looks good too. Sounds great with D'addario short scale Chromes (flats) on it. See link below. Now, having made specific recommendations, we'll see how many people disagree completely.

http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/JagBsVMSSCar/
#7
Quote by Raining Kasch
FAQ wasn't much help. Gave me nothing on what I was posting for, just how to use the website. Anyhoo, to dullsilver_mike, I'm headed to college. I plan on taking a course in piano, and even choir so I can learn to sing. Currently I'm on the waiting list for both.
In the meantime, I feel a strong urge to learn something new that will contribute to my playing (not talking about scales, don't suggest it). Don't have enough space for drums, though I would like to try that someday. So I'm goin' for bass.
Now, back to the original question. Help?


Tam meant the FAQ at the top of the bass forum thread list, up at the top alongside the Forum Plan thread etc.
#8
Quote by VeloDog
One of the problems in answering the question is that so many people will have differing opinions, some of which directly contradict each other. I fumbled in the dark as a guitarist trying to learn bass several years ago. I can pass on some information that was valid for me. Might not be valid for others.

Assuming that you want to continue playing guitar while learning bass, I suggest you start with a decent, inexpensive short scale bass. Many bass-only musicians like long scale basses, but they're not switching back and forth between bass and guitar. The switch back and forth is much easier with a short scale bass, IMHO. I started out with a long-scale bass but made much faster progress when I switched to a short scale bass.

Start out using flatwound strings. Lets you break the fingering and fretting technique(s) into two parts. Get to where you can fret flatwounds cleanly first, then tackle roundwounds with their squeakiness later.

Don't worry too much about your first bass. Use it as a learning tool to get a better picture of what you want your second bass to be, and then buy a nice second bass when you know what you want. Conversely, if your first bass is not too expensive and you decide to give up bassin', you won't have much money in that first bass.

Although any number of beginner's basses will fill the bill, here's a recommendation for a first bass, the Squier Jaguar Special Short Scale. It's $170 delivered to your door, has both a Precision and Jazz pickup, so it's very versatile sound-wise, and has a nice fast neck. Looks good too. Sounds great with D'addario short scale Chromes (flats) on it. See link below. Now, having made specific recommendations, we'll see how many people disagree completely.

http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/JagBsVMSSCar/


I disagree with every recommendation in this post
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