#1
If I have a 20W combo amp (Fender Mustang I)... Can I plug it into a 150W 412 cabinet (Fender Mustang V 412)? Or is it not so simple as that?
'Slap bass refers to the slap delivered to the bassist when they play too loud or with any kind of attention drawing behaviour...'

'The dusty end, is not my friend.'
#4
As stated above, as long as your amp has speaker outputs, you can connect it to an extension cabinet. HOWEVER, you must ensure you match the impedance - by this I mean, if your speaker out reads '8 Ohms' for example, ensure that the cabinet you plug in to is also 8 Ohms. This is something of an oversimplification, but if you are new to guitar amps you are better off making sure your impedance always matches.
Also, I am assuming you understand that plugging a 20W amp into a 150W cabinet will not make your amp 150W? Your amp cannot put out more power than it is rated for, a 20W amp will always be 20W. However, it will sound 'bigger' through a 4x12 as you have more speakers pushing the sound out.
Gear:
Fender AVRI '62 Jazzmaster, Fender Gold Sparkle Strat (custom), Custom Swirled Roswell Rhoads
Marshall DSL15H, Weber Speakers, Fender Champs (x2),
'63 Fender Reverb, Mosrite Fuzzrite, Joe Bonamassa Fuzz Face, Whiteface RAT
Vintage Tubes!
#5
Quote by jukejointjohnny
As stated above, as long as your amp has speaker outputs, you can connect it to an extension cabinet. HOWEVER, you must ensure you match the impedance - by this I mean, if your speaker out reads '8 Ohms' for example, ensure that the cabinet you plug in to is also 8 Ohms. This is something of an oversimplification, but if you are new to guitar amps you are better off making sure your impedance always matches.
Also, I am assuming you understand that plugging a 20W amp into a 150W cabinet will not make your amp 150W? Your amp cannot put out more power than it is rated for, a 20W amp will always be 20W. However, it will sound 'bigger' through a 4x12 as you have more speakers pushing the sound out.
In his case, the impedance isn't necessarily critical since his amp doesn't have an output transformer. Solid state amps typically don't, which means the impedance can be mismatched without frying the amp.
Quote by MightyAl
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#6
Quote by Ferrets!
In his case, the impedance isn't necessarily critical since his amp doesn't have an output transformer. Solid state amps typically don't, which means the impedance can be mismatched without frying the amp.


Absolutely, I just believe it good not to get into bad habits when hooking up cabs to amps, especially if TS is fairly new to guitar amps. I've always thought it better to match your impedance just to be on the safe side, that way no mistakes are made when the eventual upgrade to a valve amp occurs.
Gear:
Fender AVRI '62 Jazzmaster, Fender Gold Sparkle Strat (custom), Custom Swirled Roswell Rhoads
Marshall DSL15H, Weber Speakers, Fender Champs (x2),
'63 Fender Reverb, Mosrite Fuzzrite, Joe Bonamassa Fuzz Face, Whiteface RAT
Vintage Tubes!
#7
I've been looking at this amp for a while now and I ASSUMED that all amps had a line out, like another cable to go to the big speakers when i've done gigs, little ones that is... The one I have does... But this new amp i'm looking at doesn't have that. It has a headphone out. Thats all. How will I put it through a PA system at open mics and stuff? With the headphone out? That doesn't sound right at all... Confusion...
'Slap bass refers to the slap delivered to the bassist when they play too loud or with any kind of attention drawing behaviour...'

'The dusty end, is not my friend.'