#1
Hey all.
I need a solid theory book for when I'm on vacation or at my mom's place where there is no instrument.
I already know single note theory but don't know about harmony.
It also shouldn't be teaching through sight reading because I will learn it later on 2 years before going to a conservatorium.
#2
You must lead an incredibly frustrated life... 'learning' snippets of theory and trying to fit them together in a way that makes sense, but to no avail.

No decent theory book is going to teach you theory without the use of standard notation.

Get the AB Guide to music theory by Eric Taylor. Reading standard notation isn't hard. You don't have to learn to sightread, just know what notes are on the page. Don't skip a chapter until you fully understand the previous ones content.
Last edited by griffRG7321 at Aug 1, 2011,
#3
What's wrong with standard notation? Nothing will teach you it like having to struggle through it; it will at least get you familiar with the clefs so you'll be able to sightread easier later.

I'd listen to Griff, he seems to have a lot of theory books... .
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#4
i really really recomend you to take a guitar by any means, probly an acoustic, or maybe get a small portable mini amp and take an electric... i couldn't pic vacations without a guitar
Living is a bless, most of the people just exist

i'm out of my mind, insane, and what i say is sht or doesn't make sense, still your reading this.
#5
Quote by liampje
I need a solid theory book for when I'm on vacation or at my mom's place where there is no instrument.

It also shouldn't be teaching through sight reading because I will learn it later on 2 years before going to a conservatorium.


can't help you there. griff knows a lot more about books than i do. i would try his suggestion if you're really so averse to learning to read.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#6
Harmony and Voice Leading by Edward Aldwell (isbn: 0495189758)

This was a textbook I used for two university theory courses. Assuming you actually take the time to understand it (as opposed to just reading it to pretend that your learning) you'll get quite a bit out of this book.

Fair warning, if you can't read music, you're going to have a really rough time learning voiced harmony.
Funky c, Funky do
#7
Quote by griffRG7321
You must lead an incredibly frustrated life... 'learning' snippets of theory and trying to fit them together in a way that makes sense, but to no avail.

No decent theory book is going to teach you theory without the use of standard notation.

Get the AB Guide to music theory by Eric Taylor. Reading standard notation isn't hard. You don't have to learn to sightread, just know what notes are on the page. Don't skip a chapter until you fully understand the previous ones content.

I know what the notes are on the treble and bass clef.
Then I could read it if it's the only thing.
What's the difference between sight reading and reading standard notation?
Ill look up the book now.
EDIT: Sorry for leading you to a Dutch link but is this http://www.bol.com/nl/p/engelse-boeken/the-a-b-guide-to-music-theory/1001004001091183/index.html the book?
Last edited by liampje at Aug 1, 2011,
#8
Well sight reading implies that you are going to play what you read without prior knowledge of the piece whereas just reading standard notation is merely understanding what the black dots are on the page...

You can't learn theory without knowing the basic language it's like learning to write without knowing what the letters are
#9
Quote by liampje
I know what the notes are on the treble and bass clef.
Then I could read it if it's the only thing.
What's the difference between sight reading and reading standard notation?
Ill look up the book now.
EDIT: Sorry for leading you to a Dutch link but is this http://www.bol.com/nl/p/engelse-boeken/the-a-b-guide-to-music-theory/1001004001091183/index.html the book?


Yes that is the book.

Being able to read music - Knowing the notes on the stave

Being able to sightread - transfer those notes to your instrument in real time.
#10
Quote by griffRG7321
Yes that is the book.

Being able to read music - Knowing the notes on the stave

Being able to sightread - transfer those notes to your instrument in real time.

And that's the only thing I need to be able to do?
#11
Quote by liampje
And that's the only thing I need to be able to do?


to qualify as "able to read music", yes.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#12
Quote by AeolianWolf
to qualify as "able to read music", yes.

yay, i've been able to read music for a year haha no in all seriousness my fluidity didn't come till a month ago :/

liampje, u need to learn how to read sheet music...like every1 said, u dont need to sightread, which means being able to look at sheet music and play it on your instrument quickly (much simpler, slightly more casual definition, i'm into that kind of language). when you understand how to read sheet music, you know the language in which a theory book or a theory teacher could communicate music theory to you. some day, however, u should still learn to sightread, its just helpful and its part of becoming a better musician.

idk the book griff recommended but it looks legit to me after looking it up. just remember to read slow, itll probably tell you some things you find boring at first, but patience and admitting that you still need to read it even if you've heard some of it is part of simply being a mature musician and a mature person.

edit: why aren't your links ever english? http://www.amazon.com/Guide-Music-Theory-Part-Pt/dp/1854724460/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top
Last edited by TMVATDI at Aug 3, 2011,
#13
Quote by TMVATDI


because he speaks dutch? my dutch is pretty poor but my german is good enough (and my english, too, the three languages are fairly closely related) to make it out.

the absolute minimum of sight-reading that i think a musician should maintain is, if given a starting pitch, the ability to sing a written melody of fair length. this is why ear training is so important. instrumental sight-reading is beyond that -- i can sight-read fairly well on guitar, and same on piano -- but anything with 3 or more voices and i become useless.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
Last edited by AeolianWolf at Aug 3, 2011,