#1
Ok so I'm going to be a freshman in college this year. The school that I'm going to requires that you audition to be in the music program. It says I need to perform two contrasting pieces with sheet music for an accompanist. Now, I'm assuming that they want more sophisticated music. I was thinking I'd play a jazz song for one of them. But, the problem is I don't know a single jazz song. I mean, I transcribe them and figure out what is going on, and then apply it to my playing with a little more feel. But, I don't know a single song. So what is a good song to play? It doesn't have to be extremely easy, but I have to audition in about three weeks, so I need to be able to perfect if by then. Then I was thinking that for the other song, I'd play something that I like. Would it be alright if I played a blues song or a rock ballad? I kinda either wanted to play something by the Allman Brothers or Journey. Also, do they have to be strictly covers or are you usually allowed to improvise?
#2
Wow... you really should have thought of this MUCH sooner.

What you need to do is contact the school and ask them what their expectations are. Most universities (and colleges) require you to play classical or jazz, and to do so at a high level. (classical = grade 8-10 pieces) Consider this: four years of a university program is not a long time in the grander scheme of things. At the end of that, you're going to be saying "I have a degree in music." You should be pretty damned good already.

If you go in and improvise something, for most programs, you'll be thoroughly screwed. If you play a rock ballad, they might not even be able to politely contain their giggles.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#3
To be honest, I think I'm pretty good already. It's just that jazz and classical are not my forte by any means. As I said, I don't know any jazz pieces, but I transcribe jazz songs and apply it to my style of music everyday. But, could you please give me some suggestions instead of telling me how much I'm screwed =)? Would you recommend not even bothering to try to get in? Because as far as I'm concerned I study music a lot on my own time. I feel like the best way to learn is just by listening and analyzing music, and then experimenting with it. Pretty much the entire reason I want to be in it is so I don't have to give up any time that I devote to music. I practice about 10 hours a day, and the only way I'd be able to practice that much is if I was in the music program.
Last edited by WalrusNutFart at Aug 2, 2011,
#4
I can't tell you you are screwed, but I can agree with everything the above poster said.

I recently auditioned for piano(Well, as in 5 and a half months ago) and it was sort of tough to say the least. I shot a bit higher than what was needed, but they want you to know what you're going to be working on in school. Don't expect to be playing Smoke On The Water(if you did audition with that, get it on a recording please...you'll be a legend), but learning the jazz and classical will open up many other opportunities.

The techniques used, structures, etc. All of that can lead into what you like playing.

All that said, I have two useful things you can do along with a possible option:

1. Email the professors. Now! Or as soon as you read this. Ask THEM what would be suitable. I emailed and even called one of the professors quite a bit prior to my audition to make sure what I was doing would be ok and anything else I should work on. Do that.

2. Learn something, quick.

3.(optional, and not a bad idea) go into the first semester undeclared. When audition time comes around for the 2012 Fall semester, audition then. Basically, spend your first year knocking out general ed. and save yourself for the next year, audition for the program. Of course, practice for what you would need. This would give you plenty of time to prepare should you use it wisely.

Also, don't be surprised if they want you to sight read off of SHEET MUSIC. That will need to be worked on. I maybe could have got an even bigger scholarship had my sight reading been up to par. Everything you do in that audition will count. If I were you, even though it's not the fun one, I'd do a mix of option 1 and 3. Email the professors, learn some more about it, and then audition your next year of college.
#5
Quote by Christian Davis
I can't tell you you are screwed, but I can agree with everything the above poster said.

I recently auditioned for piano(Well, as in 5 and a half months ago) and it was sort of tough to say the least. I shot a bit higher than what was needed, but they want you to know what you're going to be working on in school. Don't expect to be playing Smoke On The Water(if you did audition with that, get it on a recording please...you'll be a legend), but learning the jazz and classical will open up many other opportunities.

The techniques used, structures, etc. All of that can lead into what you like playing.

All that said, I have two useful things you can do along with a possible option:

1. Email the professors. Now! Or as soon as you read this. Ask THEM what would be suitable. I emailed and even called one of the professors quite a bit prior to my audition to make sure what I was doing would be ok and anything else I should work on. Do that.

2. Learn something, quick.

3.(optional, and not a bad idea) go into the first semester undeclared. When audition time comes around for the 2012 Fall semester, audition then. Basically, spend your first year knocking out general ed. and save yourself for the next year, audition for the program. Of course, practice for what you would need. This would give you plenty of time to prepare should you use it wisely.

Also, don't be surprised if they want you to sight read off of SHEET MUSIC. That will need to be worked on. I maybe could have got an even bigger scholarship had my sight reading been up to par. Everything you do in that audition will count. If I were you, even though it's not the fun one, I'd do a mix of option 1 and 3. Email the professors, learn some more about it, and then audition your next year of college.


I was already thinking about your third suggestion. I'd like to do that, but I just signed up for classes, so that's why I'm on such a late schedule. I'm going to try to change my classes, but I'm not sure if I'll be wait listed and then stuck with the classes that I signed up for. Also, I'm not that stupid to play smoke on the water. I was talking more along the lines of something like Jessica by the Allman Brothers. Plus I'd obviously choose iron man before smoke on the water =)
#6
Quote by WalrusNutFart
To be honest, I think I'm pretty good already. It's just that jazz and classical are not forte by any means.


those two sentences don't really go hand in hand. if you're not familiar with jazz and classical at least fundamentally, then you're average at best. and this isn't coming from my head -- in my experience, you're not taken seriously if you don't have a strong background in either classical or jazz (at least in competitive contexts, and audition exams for music schools would absolutely be considered "competitive contexts"). i've seen you on here enough to know you know what you're talking about. i'm not saying you suck or anything of the sort -- i'm just objectively telling you that maybe you should reconsider your self-evaluation, because you're now at the mercy of the admissions department at the school.

chris's post is pretty good, and, to tell you the truth, davis's option 3 isn't all that bad, either. it all depends on what suits you. best of luck.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#7
I agree with all that's said above. You should already know the requirements for the auditions, you should have read through them and assessed your own current skills against them when you applied.

If you didn't however, it's time to look them up, and be realistic about what you can and cannot do. If it's a simple community college thing, hey, you may get in. I know many a musician that has come from a community college (if that's the US version of tafe in Australia) and they have come out not bad. However if this is Berklee or something similar, I think your preparation is far behind the par.

I'd put it off for a year. If you have to lose your application cash to do it, just go, ask for real feedback, say you'll try again next year and leave.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#8
what school/country/degree? have you called them (if not, DO IT TOMORROW)?
if its in the US, if the degree is guitar performance (as opposed to jazz studies or contemporary music/music industry studies/studio guitar), and it isn't called Berklee College of Music or Belmont University, you can generally bet they want classical (ESPECIALLY if they use the term standard repetoire)--id safely bet the allman brothers are out of the question. If they let you play jazz (coming from an electric background, and if you've transcribed stuff itl probably be best for you to do this), you really can't go wrong with something like Billie's Bounce and Misty, or Autumn Leaves (played up) and Blue in Green.
good luck, call the school.
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
#9
Quote by AeolianWolf
those two sentences don't really go hand in hand. if you're not familiar with jazz and classical at least fundamentally, then you're average at best.

I'm actually pretty familiar with the fundamentals(I know that seems weird because I said I don't know any songs, maybe that was a bad way to put it, I just don't have any completely memorized), but I know where the notes come from of most jazz songs I transcribe, I try to find cool and different ways of playing the chord progressions, I know my major, minor, dominant, m7b5, and diminished arpeggios well. I don't think I'd be very useful, or at least not enjoy it as much at a school where I study Jazz all the time. Like I said before, one of the main reasons I play Jazz is so I can apply it to my playing. I don't really want to pursue jazz(at least right now). Also, are you saying that (insert most blues and rock guitarists here) aren't good because they don't play jazz or classical? I think I'm going to wait till next year to see if it's something I really want to be a part of. I didn't get accepted until two weeks ago, so I've been pretty forced to rush into everything without thinking much about it. Thank you guys, you've been a big help. and the school is westminster college in salt lake city.
Last edited by WalrusNutFart at Aug 2, 2011,
#10
Quote by WalrusNutFart
Also, are you saying that (insert most blues and rock guitarists here) aren't good because they don't play jazz or classical?


i'm sorry, did i say that?

just because you don't play either/or doesn't mean you're not good. but in my experience, guitarists with experience in one or both genres are better than those without. then again, that's in my experience, and i've seen some freaky shit.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
Last edited by AeolianWolf at Aug 2, 2011,
#11
Your story is not unlike mine. It was fall, and I wanted to audition for next year's B. Mus. program, and auditions typically happened in April. I was a decent player, but classical and jazz were not really my strengths.

I hooked up with the right teacher who assessed what classical stuff I did know, and started me at about a grade three level.

By April, I auditioned playing mostly grade 8 pieces, though not as solid as they should have been.

They were "good enough" that I was given "permission of the department" to take many of the music courses I would need for my degree, despite not actually being in the music program just yet. I worked my @ss for practicing for another year and auditioned the next April playing a grade 8, a grade 9 and two grade ten pieces and got in.

Perhaps your course of entrance might be similar?

But again... call them NOW and find out what their audition requirements are.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.