#1
Dont get me wrong...I know every note on the fretboard...been playing for years and
understand basic theory. But I find it sometimes will take me several seconds to find certain note sequences sometimes and i sometimes have to do that annoying thing where I start by the open string and count my way up to the desired fret to figure it out

I also feel so lost if i change tunings...

Anyone have any tips? is there a better or more advanced way of learning where these notes are faster?
#2
Just memorize the notes? Idk what to tell you, that's how i did it. Memorized until i could do it perfectly. PERFECTLY.
#3
im in the same boat as you. memorizing seems like the only way but its A LOT of memorizing. if i can add a question, when changing tuning, do you picture the scale shifting in your head? ive only been playing for about a year and a half so im still pretty nooby.
#4
Just memorise it

They always appear in the same order, and repeat all over the fretboard. Perhaps it would help if you learnt the formulae for the major and minor scales?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#5
pick a note every day and find that note on every string, saying the name of the note as you pick it.

But to make it truly effective, put pressure on your yourself. Get a metronome and set a tempo, and then pick the note in a new position on every click. This stops you taking to long to think about where the notes are, this will encourage you to memorize it quicker.

The first day you do it start fairly slow, and then raise the tempo over time. This got me knowing the fretboard very quickly.

You want to be able to know it with out thinking.

Also, try finding the notes of the open string on the string below it, like the open A is the same as the 5th fret on the E string.

Remember above fret 12 is identical to below fret 12 to.

That should all help a lot =)

To truly get these things down it take effort, but is very worth it.
#8
I just know what every interval from a given note (the open string) is. So, 2 frets up from G is a major second, or A. 8 frets is a minor sixth/augmented 5th, Eb/D#. This way, even if I change tunings, I'll be able to find the notes on any given string.

It's also good to know how to make intervals between two strings. I know a major sixth from any note on the E string is either 4 frets higher on the A string or 1 fret lower on the D string. Rinse and repeat with all intervals, descending and ascending.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#9
Quote by dvm25
Dont get me wrong...I know every note on the fretboard...been playing for years and
understand basic theory. But I find it sometimes will take me several seconds to find certain note sequences sometimes and i sometimes have to do that annoying thing where I start by the open string and count my way up to the desired fret to figure it out

I also feel so lost if i change tunings...

Anyone have any tips? is there a better or more advanced way of learning where these notes are faster?


To answer your question, there is a better and more advanced way of learning it, in my opinion - it's how I teach it. Now, I know you say you "know them", and that would make me hesitate seeing you as a good candidate for what I teach, simply because, in my experience, those who think they already know "all this" have a really hard time with the discipline and self control necessary to slow their roll and follow the process, so they tend to race though and, I'm sorry, but unless they do everything I say exactly as I teach they're just wasting your money and time (thankfully I screen those guys out).

I don't know what your time on the notes are, but for those who follow what I teach, the learning outcome is that any note on the neck can be identified and played on any string in less than 2 seconds, and the vast majority are reporting times of less than a second within a week of graduating the course. So, unequivocally, yes there's a better way, in my opinion.

Now for you, I'd recommend something like Fretboard Warrior, and a set time to work through it as part of your warm up, instead, and its a bonus because its also free.

Best,

Sean
#10
Quote by dvm25
Dont get me wrong...I know every note on the fretboard...been playing for years and
understand basic theory. But I find it sometimes will take me several seconds to find certain note sequences sometimes and i sometimes have to do that annoying thing where I start by the open string and count my way up to the desired fret to figure it out

I also feel so lost if i change tunings...

Anyone have any tips? is there a better or more advanced way of learning where these notes are faster?


I don't believe learning every note on the fret-board in a hurry and without context just for the sake of learning it is such useful thing.

The way you truly learn it, is through consistent reinforcement. That happens when you read music. It happens when you study theory and apply it to your guitar.


You can memorize where all note names are in a few days, but to know the fret-board. That takes time. Be patient.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 2, 2011,
#11
I run through the cycle of fifths (alternating with the cycle of fourths) as the start note and play all the Cs on the fretboard followed by all the Gs (Fs for cycle of fourths), etc.

I do this in time with a metronome and have increased the bpm over time. I started this about 30 years ago and still do it as a warm up exercise a couple times a month.
#12
Quote by Quintex
I run through the cycle of fifths (alternating with the cycle of fourths) as the start note and play all the Cs on the fretboard followed by all the Gs (Fs for cycle of fourths), etc.

I do this in time with a metronome and have increased the bpm over time. I started this about 30 years ago and still do it as a warm up exercise a couple times a month.


Are you a Jazz player by chance? Because I have found that to especially helpful when I started learning Jazz, although I know the notes, I find the 5ths/4ths cycling warmup to be so important for feeling key changes over Jazz progressions, more naturally on the fly.

Best,

Sean
#14
Quote by Sean0913
Are you a Jazz player by chance? Because I have found that to especially helpful when I started learning Jazz, although I know the notes, I find the 5ths/4ths cycling warmup to be so important for feeling key changes over Jazz progressions, more naturally on the fly.

Best,

Sean

Started in Jazz/Swing/Big Band with Bass Trombone, bass guitar and guitar. Went to Rock/Pop when I left University.

Now I am middle aged, bored, back taking lessons and Jazz is again on the menu.

Nothing beats an open Jazz session for fun in my books. Also got sucked into the whole guitar synth scene where experimentation with sound just seems to work better jazz based.
#15
Quote by Quintex
I run through the cycle of fifths (alternating with the cycle of fourths) as the start note and play all the Cs on the fretboard followed by all the Gs (Fs for cycle of fourths), etc.

I do this in time with a metronome and have increased the bpm over time. I started this about 30 years ago and still do it as a warm up exercise a couple times a month.


Oh, that's a good idea! I'll have to give this a shot.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.