#1
Hi, I got a new Jackson Dk2M for my birthday nearly a month and for some reason when ever I use my whammy bar with my tuning lock on, it makes a clicking sort of crack noise. I thought straight away that it was the tuning lock and tried it without it on and it was fine, does anybody have any ideas on how to prevent this?

-Thanks
#2
I have the same guitar and the same problem
Rubbing the nut grooves with a pencil tip helped.
Wrong forum btw
I'm not a James Hetfield fan
My username is "hames jetfield" because "farty mriedman" sounds weird.

Quote by laid-to-waste
i have rabies from licking my pet rat's face


Jackson DK2M
Digitech RP255
Vox DA5
Casio CTK-6000
Last edited by hames jetfield at Aug 2, 2011,
#3
yep, rubbing with coal helps preventing that prob. good luck
hands down.
#4
Sorry for sounding like a douche but where exactly should i be rubbing? And sorry which forum should I have posted this in? Im fairly new here haha
-thanks
#6
loosen all the strings(can be tricky with floyd rose).
Take out the strings from the nut groove.
Rub graphite on the groove where the string rests.
Do this for all the strings. Kinda hard to explain in text.
Edit- this belongs to the guitar gear and accesories forum. Musician talk is for discussing music theory.
I'm not a James Hetfield fan
My username is "hames jetfield" because "farty mriedman" sounds weird.

Quote by laid-to-waste
i have rabies from licking my pet rat's face


Jackson DK2M
Digitech RP255
Vox DA5
Casio CTK-6000
Last edited by hames jetfield at Aug 2, 2011,
#7
Modulation is where the tonal center moves to another point or the quality changes.
Ow wait this isn't musician talk!
Wait it is....
#8
Ah okay, thanks, I'll do it when I can be bothered haha! I know how to take the strings off and retune it btw, im not that bad.
Like I said, thanks!
#9
Quote by billymyers
Ah okay, thanks, I'll do it when I can be bothered haha! I know how to take the strings off and retune it btw, im not that bad.
Like I said, thanks!


You don't have to take them off. Just loosen them (one at a time) a bit so you can move them out of the string slot...again, one at a time. This way you loosen one, move it out of the slot, put the graphite in, move it back in the slot, tune it...then move to the next string.

That will avoid you loosening them all and getting into the chase-your-tail process of tuning the thing back up.
#10
Since we're Musician's Talking we can say this here, right?

Buy a small tube of graphite powder and keep it in your guitar case... or replace the cheesy cam lever nut with a real Floyd nut that locks down with screws... then work on those Phrygian Modes...
Last edited by Terry Gorle at Aug 2, 2011,
#11
Actually, I never had to use any graphite, etc...on my Floyd Rose, and I've owned the thing since about 1983.

For my non-FR guitars I just use plain old pencil lead in the nut. (yeah, I know it's not lead) I roll the tip in the nut and make sure the shavings fall in the groove.

That whole process sound pretty strange when explained
#12
Quote by MikeDodge
Actually, I never had to use any graphite, etc...on my Floyd Rose, and I've owned the thing since about 1983.

For my non-FR guitars I just use plain old pencil lead in the nut. (yeah, I know it's not lead) I roll the tip in the nut and make sure the shavings fall in the groove.

That whole process sound pretty strange when explained

Pencil "lead" is graphite... buying the powder in a tube is just way to keep it handy and clean to apply. And yes, you probably only need graphite if you have a cam tensioning nut that doesn't get tight enough to stop slippage (creating tuning issues too, because it won't always rebound properly once it slips).
At one point my Floyd saddles had worn to the point they developed burrs and began cutting strings... a few minutes with a small round file and some emory cloth smoothed things out... then I got in the habit of adding a dot of graphite powder on each saddle when I changed strings... hoping it would slow down wear in the future.

As a BTW in case anyone with a Floyd might find this helpful:
I block my Floyd's to sit parallel to the body surface, adding a small block of wood between the spring block and the body rout hole. I use at least 4 springs to keep the bridge stable so it doesn't flex forward when I'm doing heavy bends... it only dives when I want it to, and I can break a string and still finish the song in tune... better sustain too.
Also, I buy normal strings... and rout them from the machine heads to the bridge, letting the brass end be the stopper at the peg. Pull them through the nut slots and cut them with about 1-1/2" of extra length at each saddle... tighten the cut end in the saddle and you'll get about 3 turns on your pegs before you're in tune. 90% of the time you break a string it will be at the saddle. Clip the break to get a clean string end to clamp, and a quick unwind of 2 turns and re-tighten can have you back in action in less than a minute while your singer chats with the audience.
Last edited by Terry Gorle at Aug 2, 2011,
#13
Quote by hames jetfield
loosen all the strings(can be tricky with floyd rose).
Take out the strings from the nut groove.
Rub graphite on the groove where the string rests.
Do this for all the strings. Kinda hard to explain in text.
Edit- this belongs to the guitar gear and accesories forum. Musician talk is for discussing music theory.


That's the complicated way to do it. Take the clamps off put some of graphite lubricant on the string channels.

You can get graphite lubricant at any auto store.


EDIT:

You can also use silicon lubricant


The most important thing is make sure it's set properly

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=614226
Gear
Jackson DK2
Ibanez RGR320EX
Guild X82 Nova
Godin Seagull S6

Vox V847
Vox VT40+ / VFS5 VT


Quote by FatalGear41

Right now, there are six and a half billion people on earth who don't care what kind of tubes you have in your amplifier
Last edited by Willowthewitch at Aug 3, 2011,
#14
Quote by Terry Gorle
Pencil "lead" is graphite... buying the powder in a tube is just way to keep it handy and clean to apply. And yes, you probably only need graphite if you have a cam tensioning nut that doesn't get tight enough to stop slippage (creating tuning issues too, because it won't always rebound properly once it slips).
At one point my Floyd saddles had worn to the point they developed burrs and began cutting strings... a few minutes with a small round file and some emory cloth smoothed things out... then I got in the habit of adding a dot of graphite powder on each saddle when I changed strings... hoping it would slow down wear in the future.

As a BTW in case anyone with a Floyd might find this helpful:
I block my Floyd's to sit parallel to the body surface, adding a small block of wood between the spring block and the body rout hole. I use at least 4 springs to keep the bridge stable so it doesn't flex forward when I'm doing heavy bends... it only dives when I want it to, and I can break a string and still finish the song in tune... better sustain too.
Also, I buy normal strings... and rout them from the machine heads to the bridge, letting the brass end be the stopper at the peg. Pull them through the nut slots and cut them with about 1-1/2" of extra length at each saddle... tighten the cut end in the saddle and you'll get about 3 turns on your pegs before you're in tune. 90% of the time you break a string it will be at the saddle. Clip the break to get a clean string end to clamp, and a quick unwind of 2 turns and re-tighten can have you back in action in less than a minute while your singer chats with the audience.

+1 for having brass ends at the tuning pegs. That way you can break a string several times and still be able to use it. I love FR bridges for that! I probably should smoothen my bridge as well though.
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
#15
Quote by Terry Gorle
Pencil "lead" is graphite... buying the powder in a tube is just way to keep it handy and clean to apply. And yes, you probably only need graphite if you have a cam tensioning nut that doesn't get tight enough to stop slippage (creating tuning issues too, because it won't always rebound properly once it slips).
At one point my Floyd saddles had worn to the point they developed burrs and began cutting strings... a few minutes with a small round file and some emory cloth smoothed things out... then I got in the habit of adding a dot of graphite powder on each saddle when I changed strings... hoping it would slow down wear in the future.

As a BTW in case anyone with a Floyd might find this helpful:
I block my Floyd's to sit parallel to the body surface, adding a small block of wood between the spring block and the body rout hole. I use at least 4 springs to keep the bridge stable so it doesn't flex forward when I'm doing heavy bends... it only dives when I want it to, and I can break a string and still finish the song in tune... better sustain too.
Also, I buy normal strings... and rout them from the machine heads to the bridge, letting the brass end be the stopper at the peg. Pull them through the nut slots and cut them with about 1-1/2" of extra length at each saddle... tighten the cut end in the saddle and you'll get about 3 turns on your pegs before you're in tune. 90% of the time you break a string it will be at the saddle. Clip the break to get a clean string end to clamp, and a quick unwind of 2 turns and re-tighten can have you back in action in less than a minute while your singer chats with the audience.


I think the pencil lead (I know it's graphite that's why I mentioned it wasn't lead) is actually less messier than the tube of graphite. With the pencil I can get as much as I want right where I want it. And once the string is settled, I just blow out any extra.

I also do the thing where I wrap extra string around the tuner post to be able to unwind it and reuse the string. I don't leave the ball end on though, I snip it during initial stringing.
#16
Quote by MikeDodge
I think the pencil lead (I know it's graphite that's why I mentioned it wasn't lead) is actually less messier than the tube of graphite. With the pencil I can get as much as I want right where I want it. And once the string is settled, I just blow out any extra.

I also do the thing where I wrap extra string around the tuner post to be able to unwind it and reuse the string. I don't leave the ball end on though, I snip it during initial stringing.

...well, your results may vary... I can admit on one or two occasions to squeezing the tube a bit too hard and POOF!!! ... instant coalminer.

I save my snippers for the end that matters... using the ball is faster, without the extra snip and foldback or peglock. And, there's a bonus... it eliminates the risk of accidental bleeding when stringing or cleaning the headstock. I can remember a few, and I don't miss that sting.

Aside from the end of "floyd-chatter" as we know it, just think of all the fingertips that might be saved if this thread ever gets placed in the proper subforum...
Last edited by Terry Gorle at Aug 3, 2011,