#1
I play good old classic heavy rock from hendrix to zep to thin lizzy and have had my heart set on a marshall after playing my mates stack but who knows.

It's unlikely I will be gigging any time soon but I would probably have the money for a good JCM800 and cab but I fear it not sounding any good at low volumes. Would I be better off with a solid state, combo, hybrid or what?

Suggestions greatly appreciated.
#2
whats your budget?

Quote by static_music34
your guitar doesn't exist, apparently


good one...
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#3
Whats your price limit?

If thats not an issue, or you can save up, get a splawn quickrod. They are marshall based amps that sound 10x better.
What?! There's a clean channel on my amp?!

Quote by GoodOl'trashbag
omfg i totally forgot about that, you sir are jesus christ.
#5
Having used god knows how many amps over the years I would always favour a tube amp over solid state any day. I use a rack system with a mesa 50 50 power amp and it has a low power switch and if you engage that you can play at house friendly volumes and it still sounds better than a solid state effort even though the tubes aren't having to breath too heavily. Some heads and combos offer power cut functions. Blackstar I think were advertising that as a performance feature in one of their amps at least off the top of my head. If the time comes around a year from now where you get a call to go and gig then I reckon you would be better of with some kind of tube amp or head. I have tried so many different solid state power amps and solid state heads paired with a tube preamp and the sound always suffered I felt without a tube power amp.

Good luck
#6
There are also power soak options that allow you to work the amp hard although the volume from your speakers is low. Eg marshall powerbrake or similar. Its extra money though obviously.
#7
Quote by shikkaka
Whats your price limit?

If thats not an issue, or you can save up, get a splawn quickrod. They are marshall based amps that sound 10x better.


Quote by HectorBznRg
whats your budget?


Budget would be around £500 if I were to go with a stack (I would only be willing to buy used).

No more than £80 for a practice amp.
#8
If you want a JCM 800 just get a combo. Whats the point of having a half stack anyway. Get an attenuator to go with it if you're worried about it sounding crap at low volumes.

Or an alternative would be buying a Laney AOR combo which is VERY close sounding to a JCM 800 for like 1/3 of the price until you gig...(I gigged mine I recently sold for the head for ages and sounded sick)

Also, going used is not a bad thing! I go used on all my amps. Much more for your money. The only thing you see in my sig that I bought new was my guitar. Don't know why I bought it new...I put a 20 year old neck on it anyway.
Last edited by moominman2 at Aug 2, 2011,
#10
+1 to Laney very good amps, that seem to be on the backburner
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#11
Quote by kutless999
Read the stickies https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1387138

We need more info please.

I just realized that that thread was made on my birthday.



Coincidence? I think not.
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#12
Quote by TheQuailman
You're in the UK. You can pick up a Laney AOR/GH/VH around that price easy. They're basically souped-up 800s.


+1

alternatively, traynor ycv50b off thomann (when they get back into stock)
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#13
Quote by OliOsbourne
I just realized that that thread was made on my birthday.



Coincidence? I think not.
lol I think it was a Coincidence
..................................................
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#14
Quote by NIN1993
lol I think it was a Coincidence

No, it definitely wasn't
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#15
Quote by 05t16
Budget would be around £500 if I were to go with a stack (I would only be willing to buy used).

No more than £80 for a practice amp.

Are you saying that combos are practice amps and stacks are "real" amps? I guess I should forget about using a tweed Fender Bassman or Super Reverb with a band and just get an MG stack

Seriously, you need a Fender. What you're hearing on most old rock albums is a cranked Fender amp.

Champs were recorded a lot and have been used by Joe Walsh (Rocky Mountain Way, Funk 49), Billy Gibbons (La Grange), Keith Richards (a lot of Stones songs), Clapton (the whole Layla album), Duane Allman (same as Clapton) I've heard that Jimmy Page has used them, George Harrison used 4 at Concert for Bangladesh, Jeff Beck (Cause We've Ended As Lovers), and a lot more that I can't think of now.

A tweed Deluxe (5E3) is another common amp for rock and blues guitarists. Neil Young has used one on almost every concert and recording since the late 60s. Joe Walsh used one a lot in the 70s (the second part of the solo in Hotel California). I think Jeff Beck has used one too.

Jimi Hendrix used tweed Bassmans (some cleaner songs), blackface Twins, and a blonde Bassman (Voodoo Chile, not slight return).

Alex Lifeson cranked a 60s Super Reverb for Fly By Night and Caress of Steel and a Twin Reverb for 2112.

I don't have time for a long list, but almost every guitarist in the 60s and 70s has used a Fender in the studio, and a lot use them live too.
#16
Quote by plexi123
Are you saying that combos are practice amps and stacks are "real" amps? I guess I should forget about using a tweed Fender Bassman or Super Reverb with a band and just get an MG stack

Seriously, you need a Fender. What you're hearing on most old rock albums is a cranked Fender amp.

Champs were recorded a lot and have been used by Joe Walsh (Rocky Mountain Way, Funk 49), Billy Gibbons (La Grange), Keith Richards (a lot of Stones songs), Clapton (the whole Layla album), Duane Allman (same as Clapton) I've heard that Jimmy Page has used them, George Harrison used 4 at Concert for Bangladesh, Jeff Beck (Cause We've Ended As Lovers), and a lot more that I can't think of now.

A tweed Deluxe (5E3) is another common amp for rock and blues guitarists. Neil Young has used one on almost every concert and recording since the late 60s. Joe Walsh used one a lot in the 70s (the second part of the solo in Hotel California). I think Jeff Beck has used one too.

Jimi Hendrix used tweed Bassmans (some cleaner songs), blackface Twins, and a blonde Bassman (Voodoo Chile, not slight return).

Alex Lifeson cranked a 60s Super Reverb for Fly By Night and Caress of Steel and a Twin Reverb for 2112.

I don't have time for a long list, but almost every guitarist in the 60s and 70s has used a Fender in the studio, and a lot use them live too.

No, he's saying he wants to buy a practice amp then a loud amp for when he has the chance to play loud. Why so srs?!
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