#1
What would the average price of an independant home studio (with all the proper mics and equipment) with pro-tools charge, recording 2-4 songs?

I know alot of studios don't charge "per-song" but if there's any way you can estimate that would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks for any help,
Alex
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#2
The x factor is time. If you can record these 2-4 songs quickly, you can save money. You need to shop around and ask for their rates, they vary with each studio. This is a phonebook question.
#3
The studio most bands in my area will do 1 song for $200 flat. I don't know if theres a time limit or anything
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#4
I'm mainly asking because a talked with a guy today who charges $600-$800 for 2-4 songs and he doesn't like to charge by the hour because he feels that causes the musicians to rush the recordings and adds pressure.
As I have no real idea of how much a studio SHOULD cost me, I want to make sure that I'm not being over priced. It feels like a good price, but I honestly don't know.
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#5
That seems reasonable, not paying by the hour is a huge plus.
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#6
I charge $200 for 7 hours of studio time. That's usually how long a song takes. Where are you located?
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#7
Quote by MaVN
I charge $200 for 7 hours of studio time. That's usually how long a song takes. Where are you located?

Without mixing, in 7 hour you can easily record 2-3 song, if the engineer is ready before you arrive in the studio! so!
#8
Quote by MaVN
I charge $200 for 7 hours of studio time. That's usually how long a song takes. Where are you located?


Western Illinois
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#9
Quote by truiteleague
Without mixing, in 7 hour you can easily record 2-3 song, if the engineer is ready before you arrive in the studio! so!

Not to a high standard you can't. Hell, I spent as long as that setting the drums up, tuning them, and getting the mics positioned right for the current recording of my band's album. Bear in mind you have to set up drums, get them sounding good, get those tracks down (which takes longer than just a couple of play throughs, as people like to hear stuff back and all sorts), then you have to do the same for guitar and bass and vocals... 2-3 songs in 3 days maybe!


Anyway, TS, most studios I know (not home studios, mind) charge about £250-300 a day. That's pretty much the going rate for a good studio + engineer in the UK anyway and that excludes residential for most of them, if it's a touring band staying at the studio.
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Last edited by DisarmGoliath at Aug 2, 2011,
#10
It's kinda like asking "how much is a dinner out?" The answer is, "it depends."

Many project studios charge what has been suggested above - a couple hundred bucks for a day of recording kind of thing.

Most "pro" studios charge about $100/hr.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#12
What do you think of this logic then?

"How much would an average electrician charge?"

"I'd say just buy a set of wire strippers, some pliers, some wire and stuff and do it yourself. Anyone who pays $500 just to get some electrical work done needs to have their head checked."

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#13
Quote by axemanchris
What do you think of this logic then?

"How much would an average electrician charge?"

"I'd say just buy a set of wire strippers, some pliers, some wire and stuff and do it yourself. Anyone who pays $500 just to get some electrical work done needs to have their head checked."

CT


That is a very poor analogy, I'm not even going to humour you.
#14
Quote by adam02
That is a very poor analogy, I'm not even going to humour you.

No, it's a very good analogy - bothare professionals in their trade, both trades are learnable with research and dedicated study. Both take years to master the quality of a professional. I'm willing to bet you're someone who has recordeda few demo-quality tracks after not very long and now consider yourself able to produce releaseable material because your poorly-developed ear leads you to believe it.

Prove me wrong, or at least see how this assumption is no fairer than your assumption about studios and the above analogy.
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#15
Quote by adam02
That is a very poor analogy, I'm not even going to humour you.


See, what I am calling you on is your apparent assumption that says "if you have the tools, you can do the job."

Just because I have a guitar doesn't mean I'm any good at it. Just because I have a pair of wire strippers and other electrical tools does not mean I know what I'm doing as an electrician. Just because I have a preamp and a mic doesn't mean I can make a good recording.

Consider this: If you've played guitar for two years, are you ready to make something that most people would call "a great guitar performance?" No. It takes time to learn how to use those tools and apply that knowledge through practice.

Same with recording.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#16
Really what it comes down to is the quality of the final product.
Why go to one guy that will charge $200 a song if its average opposed to going to a guy that will charge $250 or $300. The one thing that sucks is getting a product that isn't quite as "Big" of a sound or doesn't end up what you had in mind.

As well as whether your band can get in and hammer it out and how much time you have to set up, tune the drums, get your sounds/tones etc.

In my opinion the only real way you can determine the cost of recording would be to call studio's ask for samples of what they have done in the genre your playing or similar genre's and get their rates and look at what they offer. Ie. say your band has average amps and the studio has amazing amps which is covered in the cost of the recording and you would prefer to use theirs.

There are 10,000 ways to record these days with 10,000,000 outcomes. Hell we payed a mate that looks after a prestigious private school's recording studio(A hell of a lot of gear at our disposal) to come away for a week and chill at a holiday house and brought mixing desks, valve mics and a whole bunch of other stuff. We payed $200 a day. The quality was good enough for what we needed and we had an awesome week away recording that we will never forget. So that was worth it.

But call around, get prices and samples. Find out the average and how much your willing to pay certain people based on that and even though it is recording and not mixing/mastering. Well keep in mind you can tweak but if the recording/playing is shit then the final product will be too.
#17
One thing you have to realize about studios that charge by the hour is that some (if not most) charge by the hour for mixing as well. Mixing doesn't come till after its all recorded. So, you're looking at hourly plus how long it takes to mix. Just saying
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#18
Quote by axemanchris
See, what I am calling you on is your apparent assumption that says "if you have the tools, you can do the job."

Just because I have a guitar doesn't mean I'm any good at it. Just because I have a pair of wire strippers and other electrical tools does not mean I know what I'm doing as an electrician. Just because I have a preamp and a mic doesn't mean I can make a good recording.

Consider this: If you've played guitar for two years, are you ready to make something that most people would call "a great guitar performance?" No. It takes time to learn how to use those tools and apply that knowledge through practice.

Same with recording.

CT


No where in my post did I say "get an interface + mic and you will get the same results immediately". You shouldn't jump to those assumptions.

I was providing the idea that you can get studio/professional recordings from investing the $800 in a decent interface and a couple of mics and you're right it is a learning curve but it would work out better than dumping $800 every time you need to record a couple of songs.

Quote by DisarmGoliath
No, it's a very good analogy - bothare professionals in their trade, both trades are learnable with research and dedicated study. Both take years to master the quality of a professional.

It is a poor analogy fundamentally because of one important factor -

If you mess around with basic recording setup, the worst case scenario is you end up with a few badly made recordings.

However, if you mess around with electricity with little to no experience; the worst case scenario is you die from electrocution - cardiac arrest.

And many people have that logic anyway, many people would rather do the electrical work themselves instead of pay out $500, it makes sense in the long run, it's called DIY.

Which was my initial point.

Give a man a fish he'll eat for a day, Give a man a fishing rod he'll eat for the rest of his life with a bit of time learning and without spending $800 every time he wants a fish -.- .

Quote by DisarmGoliath


I'm willing to bet you're someone who has recordeda few demo-quality tracks after not very long and now consider yourself able to produce releaseable material because your poorly-developed ear leads you to believe it.

Prove me wrong, or at least see how this assumption is no fairer than your assumption about studios and the above analogy.


I don't think you want that bet.
#19
Quote by adam02

I don't think you want that bet.

The point of that was that it was no fairer an assumption (based on there being nothing on your profile and me not having heard of 'adam02' as a producer/engineer) than yours that the guy would be better off buying some recording gear to get a pro recording... as I know nothing about you, you know nothing about TS' audio engineering ability or current equipment.

Oh, and I could still well be right about you, oh confident one
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#20
I've made my position clear in this thread.

It's my opinion that an $800 investment would be more worthwhile in the long run on good equipment that will allow the TS to learn the craft and be rewarded tenfold after a few years of research and trial-and-error demos.
#21
Quote by adam02
I've made my position clear in this thread.

It's my opinion that an $800 investment would be more worthwhile in the long run on good equipment that will allow the TS to learn the craft and be rewarded tenfold after a few years of research and trial-and-error demos.

And if TS/TS' band wants a releasable product in the meantime (which you failed to ask, by the way, and may have been the point of the thread)? It's clear to me that TS is a million miles away from ready to release a high-quality mix, when stuff like 'that uses Pro Tools' is mentioned... what experienced engineer would judge a studio based on their DAW choice? Bands, on the other hand, will often hear of 'Pro Tools is the industry standard blah blah blah' and consider that place a good studio.

In reality, PT HD is the only one particularly different to most DAW's, and that only means the studio has a lot of money to invest in a DAW and hardware for it. Before PT 9 anything below HD was a waste of time compared to other DAW's on the market, yet many people could claim they ran a 'Pro Tools-based setup' and gain business that way even if they used M-Powered/LE.

Which reminds me, remember when we discussed that analogy... judging a studio by the DAW they use, is like only booking an electrician based on his drill and screwdriver collection. Does that sound like someone capable of creating a releasable product with $800 anytime soon?


And of course, I mean you no offense TS, but wanted to make the example and I presume you are asking out of interest/as a possible customer, rather than in the belief you are ready to charge money to record bands (not saying you aren't, but I wouldn't charge a lot for it).


Edit: Also, adam02 - you've said your bit, reply if you like but I've said mine now and don't want to get drawn into an even longer debate unless I really get tempted by something you say
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Last edited by DisarmGoliath at Aug 2, 2011,
#22
Quote by adam02
No where in my post did I say "get an interface + mic and you will get the same results immediately". You shouldn't jump to those assumptions.

I was providing the idea that you can get studio/professional recordings from investing the $800 in a decent interface and a couple of mics and you're right it is a learning curve but it would work out better than dumping $800 every time you need to record a couple of songs.


^ Now compare that to this....

Quote by adam02

I'm going to be an asshole and say take the money and buy a nice interface + mic.

If you pay $800 to record a few songs I personally believe you need your head checked.


I don't think I need to elaborate on my point there.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#23
Adam02 makes a good point, it's just that not enough information about the TS has been given for adams point to be good or bad...

If its just a few friends that are making music for a hobby and stuff, then paying $800 dollars looks pretty stupid, your better of just getting the equipment and having HOURS of fun with it!

but its if a serious band, looking to take it all 100% serious, then the studio would be smart..
#24
Quote by DarrenReeder
Adam02 makes a good point, it's just that not enough information about the TS has been given for adams point to be good or bad...

If its just a few friends that are making music for a hobby and stuff, then paying $800 dollars looks pretty stupid, your better of just getting the equipment and having HOURS of fun with it!

but its if a serious band, looking to take it all 100% serious, then the studio would be smart..

Based on a quick look at TS' profile, he can clearly already record music to a hobby guitarist tracking ideas/rough cover songs, so I'd imagine it's a fair assumption to make that he is after somewhere to record with his band/doing research on studios for something, as opposed to potentially trying to just record music and doesn't realise he could learn it himself with a small investment of money (but a lot of time investment!).

And based on that, what adam02 said is pretty ignorant, not to mention incorrect in my opinion.
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#25
I always advise people that, unless they want to actually "get into recording", then they should spend their money on studio time - even if just a project studio. The results will be immediate, and of better quality... and ultimately, less money.

However, if your goal is to get into recording... then yeah... start buying gear and having fun.

Besides... $800 is a really good budget to record a few songs. But if you're buying gear to record a full band - drums and everything - it's really only a meager start. Even never minding the time it will take to learn how to do it all reasonably well.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#26
Monitors + interface + daw + drum mics...well that's not even everything and it's over 800. I have 800 dollars of recording stuff and I can't compete with studios. In my opinion some of my newer mixes I have been doing sound very good, just not to the point it sounds like a studio, and I got a long way to go. In fact there is very few people I have heard on this site get studio quality without going to a studio.
#27
Quote by axemanchris
Besides... $800 is a really good budget to record a few songs. But if you're buying gear to record a full band - drums and everything - it's really only a meager start. Even never minding the time it will take to learn how to do it all reasonably well.


This. $800 barely gets you an interface and one or 2 mics. For my band, between all the mics we have and the Mackie Onyx 1640, we have prob $4000-5000 in that. Theres probably another $10k+ in plugins and software but thats a whole different story :p
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#28
Yeah, my interface was over $800. My monitors were almost $800. For recording drums... even a ballpark of $100/mic x 8 mics and you've got another $800 in mics. That's not counting software, computer, cables, stands, DI boxes, headphones, blah, blah, blah.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#29
Throughout this thread I've been called ignorant, wrong and to some extent challenged; solely because I did not sugarcoat my initial post.

My post made no assumptions about the TS's ability to record, he could be completely inexperienced or he might know what he's doing. My only point that I've made throughout is that I wanted to open the idea that with $800 you can learn to, for lack of a better word produce "studio quality" demos. It's incredibly fun to do especially with band mates- who coincidentally might know something about production too?

I can provide countless horror stories about young musicians like yourself who do actually spend that much on demos only to be completely disappointed.

I'm sticking by what I said, $800 is a better investment long haul. I can't sugar coat it any further.

I've read some ridiculous claims that $800 isn't a good budget at all. I call rubbish. In fact, I did some shopping:



This came to $740., with some overhead for a couple of stands,cables,pop filters(diy easily), with free shipping, and includes everything you need to record a band with decent results.

If you already have an SM57- you can swap it out for another condenser like an akg c1000 for overheads on the drums.

Monitor's aren't included but at this stage a good pair of open backed headcans can suffice with regards to mixing down.

Again this is to illustrate what is possible with $800.

I've no doubt a couple of you will find my post controversial in some way . But the truth remains that you can achieve studio quality tracks with this setup, and it wouldn't take as long as people make out, provided you do some homework and get a hold of some online mentors to help you with your mixdowns/mastering etc.

"A Good Worker Never Blames His Tools"
Last edited by adam02 at Aug 3, 2011,
#30
Quote by adam02
"A Good Worker Never Blames His Tools"

As a manufacturing engineer I can tell you that's wrong lol but that's a different thread :p

I will say you can look on here and find a ton of people who bought. Crap equip and regret prob more so than regret going to a studio
#31
Quote by FireHawk
As a manufacturing engineer I can tell you that's wrong lol but that's a different thread :p

I will say you can look on here and find a ton of people who bought. Crap equip and regret prob more so than regret going to a studio


**** this shit.

I'm out.
Last edited by adam02 at Aug 3, 2011,
#32
Adam - I don't think anyone would disagree that you could spend $800 and start making decent demos of your own. It really does represent a good start.

That said, it NEEDS to be acknowledged that this is a skill that takes time to learn. You can't just buy the gear and expect "studio quality" results. You have to practice as well. As I say, it's just like learning any other "instrument", only in this case, your "instrument" is your studio. It is hugely complex. It's like you can't buy yourself a table saw, drill, and various woodworking tools and, without experience, knowledge and practice, expect to produce a "furniture quality" china cabinet.

The other factor is that recording a whole band requires more gear than what the average home user is willing to spend - at least if you want "studio quality" results.

Your list represents a good start. Swap out the kick drum mic and the mixer and buy a decent pair of used monitors, and it's a great little start-up set for the guy who wants to do acoustic demos and stuff, or for the person who doesn't mind programming drums.

But a band with real drums? No way. The biggest problem is the interface. I thought that it had six ins and six outs, which would be limiting enough, but upon looking it up, found it has only two ins and four outs. Two ins to record drums to any standard? No way. Two ins to record a full band? No way. Would your intention for miking the drums be kick, snare, and a single overhead? IMHO, that's not enough for anything more than a rough YouTube demo. Mind you, the interface limits you to two ins anyways, so that debate is a bit moot.

If I had $800 to spend on recording my band's demo, ^ this is not the setup I would want to rely on. I would go to a project studio and block out three good days and do a really great job on it.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.