#1
Hi,

I've been playing the guitar for about 4 weeks now about 8-10 hours most days, i've been through the complete beginners course and intermediate course on justinguitar and have everything down.

I know a load of chords and a couple of scales, know the notes on the first 2 strings and can work out the rest by 'counting' up from the open string

I improvise fairly confidently with the major and minor pent(extended) over blues backing tracks etc.

rhythm is quite good playing along with and without a metronome. I recorded a fun little song with rhythm, lead and bass(i own a bass guitar too) just as practice, im quite used to recording as me and a mate record quite often(hes lead guitar, im drummer).

Basically i can do everything on those 2 courses.

I can play most of those songs justin suggests as they are pretty easy including Hysteria by Muse.

Anyway, where do i go from here?

Thanks.
#2
well where do you want to go fro here?
do you want to play rock,blues,jazz,metal etc.?
considering youve been playing for 4 weeks(not sure of previous musical experience) your ear might not have develped well so you could work on that
learn the ful major scale and how to harmonize it

work on your technique and playing as cleanly as possible
#3
Thanks for the reply. I forgot to mention I like to play blues but I also enjoy many types of music, jazz, rock, metal.

I do have to develop my ear with regards to the guitar, my drumming ear is good but that's my only previous musical experience(10 years drumming).
#4
If you ever have to ask yourself "Where do I go from here?", look no further than the music you like to listen to. If you are at a sufficient level to play the songs you're listening to now, learn them. If you aren't, use those songs as a goal for improving your technique. If you know some chords and scales, use them. Find some songs you like and learn them. That's what the instrument's for!
#5
Quote by Geldin
If you ever have to ask yourself "Where do I go from here?", look no further than the music you like to listen to. If you are at a sufficient level to play the songs you're listening to now, learn them. If you aren't, use those songs as a goal for improving your technique. If you know some chords and scales, use them. Find some songs you like and learn them. That's what the instrument's for!


Great thanks for the reply.
#6
Quote by 19dan89
Hi,

I've been playing the guitar for about 4 weeks now about 8-10 hours most days, i've been through the complete beginners course and intermediate course on justinguitar and have everything down.

I recommend you go back to the beginners course from time to time, just to remind you of the basics. Just to make sure you're doing it right.

Quote by 19dan89
I know a load of chords and a couple of scales, know the notes on the first 2 strings and can work out the rest by 'counting' up from the open string

First of all, knowing ALL the notes in the fretboard is pretty important, no matter what you play. Exercise every day, and make an effort to remember which note is which. This will allow you to master the CAGED system. Google it, it's basic, but it's crucial. CAGED system. That's where you need to go.

Of course, make sure you're fast changing from chord to chord. Being seriously fast will take time, but practice practice practice. I'm pretty sure that 8 weeks won't be enough for you to cleanly play complex chords like Cdim7 or Gsus2 and stuff like that... I take you know what those are? If not, go learn your chords.

Quote by 19dan89
I improvise fairly confidently with the major and minor pent(extended) over blues backing tracks etc.

Tip: listen to yourself. I'm pretty sure your phrasing is lacking. Practice phrasing. It's the bread and butter of improvising. GOING AROUND MODES AND SCALES IS NOT IMPROVISING.

Also, forget pentatonics. Those are seldom used, and are used to create a specific effect and mood. KNOW when to use pentatonics, but diatonics are where it's at. You probably don't know them very well. Start by the major and minor natural, get all the modes 120%, play around the fretboard on different keys and just all around, don't just play in one mode (though you need to know them all - 5 for the pentatonics and 7 for the diatonics) and then jump to another. You really need to know how to combine different modes gracefully. Don't forget to know all three-notes-per-string positions by heart too. After you know the major and minor scales 120%, go for the minor-harmonic. Then for the minor-melodic ascending and descending.

If you keep practicing phrasing as you learn this, you'll see fast improvements, as you'll be able to integrate stuff with the scales and come up with cool licks and arpeggios. Don't forget to train sweep picking long and hard, as well as bending (with at least two fingers - on the same string -whenever possible).


Quote by 19dan89
Anyway, where do i go from here?

General tip: whenever you are stuck, hear (and play!) something different. A good musician knows stuff from many genres, doesn't matter if he just plays metal or blues or rock. Learn new stuff. Hear new bands. I don't know your musical tastes, but if you want to know where you WANT to go in the very very far future, check out Dream Theater... If you can play Dream Theater, you can play it all my man.

:EDIT:
Underlined points of interest :P Sorry for the long post.
• '10 Epiphone Les Paul
• '96 Epiphone Rebel EM-1
• '10 Jackson JS32T Rhoads
• Vox Valvetronix VT20+
• Fame GTA40
• Zoom GX7.1u
• Boss MT-2 Metal Zone
• Jim Dunlop Ultex Jazz III 2mm
Last edited by Tiago Sa at Aug 2, 2011,
#7
Quote by Tiago Sa
I recommend you go back to the beginners course from time to time, just to remind you of the basics. Just to make sure you're doing it right.


First of all, knowing ALL the notes in the fretboard is pretty important, no matter what you play. Exercise every day, and make an effort to remember which note is which. This will allow you to master the CAGED system. Google it, it's basic, but it's crucial. CAGED system. That's where you need to go.

Of course, make sure you're fast changing from chord to chord. Being seriously fast will take time, but practice practice practice. I'm pretty sure that 8 weeks won't be enough for you to cleanly play complex chords like Cdim7 or Gsus2 and stuff like that... I take you know what those are? If not, go learn your chords.


Tip: listen to yourself. I'm pretty sure your phrasing is lacking. Practice phrasing. It's the bread and butter of improvising. GOING AROUND MODES AND SCALES IS NOT IMPROVISING.

Also, forget pentatonics. Those are seldom used, and are used to create a specific effect and mood. KNOW when to use pentatonics, but diatonics are where it's at. You probably don't know them very well. Start by the major and minor natural, get all the modes 120%, play around the fretboard on different keys and just all around, don't just play in one mode (though you need to know them all - 5 for the pentatonics and 7 for the diatonics) and then jump to another. You really need to know how to combine different modes gracefully. Don't forget to know all three-notes-per-string positions by heart too. After you know the major and minor scales 120%, go for the minor-harmonic. Then for the minor-melodic ascending and descending.

If you keep practicing phrasing as you learn this, you'll see fast improvements, as you'll be able to integrate stuff with the scales and come up with cool licks and arpeggios. Don't forget to train sweep picking long and hard, as well as bending (with at least two fingers - on the same string -whenever possible).


General tip: whenever you are stuck, hear (and play!) something different. A good musician knows stuff from many genres, doesn't matter if he just plays metal or blues or rock. Learn new stuff. Hear new bands. I don't know your musical tastes, but if you want to know where you WANT to go in the very very far future, check out Dream Theater... If you can play Dream Theater, you can play it all my man.

:EDIT:
Underlined points of interest :P Sorry for the long post.

Way to drown the guy, man.

All of that theory and technique is well and good (I agree with most everything you said), but that doesn't need to be your first concern 8 weeks in (or even 8 months in). Most of that stuff is entirely dependent on what kind of stuff you want to play and whether or not you intend to transpose by ear or compose your own music, but you don't need to even think about that stuff until you're a little farther down the road. Eight weeks in, your first concern is definitely learning some songs and getting used to using a variety of basic techniques in a musical context and figuring out what kind of music you want to play.
#8
Quote by Tiago Sa


Also, forget pentatonics. Those are seldom used, ... , get all the modes 120%,


I have to disagree here - pentatonics are very useful, especially so in rock and blues type stuff, and although I agree that theres no harm in learning how to use the notes of the modes youll find that the lydian mode is far less usefull in modern music than the major pentatonic is.

The major and minor scales should be thoroughly learned, but chances are you'll never need to play true modal music in your life. Learning the modes (and applying the 'modal' notes as accidentals in tonal music, as is how modes are used these days) can be useful for adding different colours to your music but is not something that I would teach to someone who has been only learning for a month.

I get the impression that you are using the word modes here to describe positions (and I agree with learning all diatonic and pentatonic positions, including three notes per string stuff), that is not what the word 'mode' means at all.


Back on topic, I agree with what most people here are saying - play what you want to play. Learn the stuff you like to listen to. If you want direction on how to improve technically then I would give the same answer - learn the stuff you like to listen to - if you can play it well then theres nothing wrong with you technically, although personally some of my favourite music (Paul Gilbert for example) is technically challenging so I have never gotten to the point where I am satisfied with my playing.

Theres no set curriculum for learning guitar and there is so much that you could learn (you cant learn it all) that the direction you take is really up to you. As long as you're having fun, you're doing it right.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
Last edited by Hydra150 at Aug 3, 2011,
#9
Thanks for all the replies they've been very helpful. I will start learning a selection of songs and go from there,

Thanks !
#10
I only skimmed through this thread, but i'd say to you, try not to overdo how much you practise. I know 4weeks in practising 8hours a day may seem like a good idea, but it's really too much.
If you keep that up i can guarantee you'll start dreading "having" to play. Guitar should be something you want to do, not a chore.
Some people on this site i know would say that playing that much would infact have a negative impact on your playing.
This being said... 30years down the track you may be the next steve vai if you keep up 8hours a day for the rest of your life haha.
Last edited by vayne92 at Aug 3, 2011,
#11
Quote by Hydra150
I get the impression that you are using the word modes here to describe positions (and I agree with learning all diatonic and pentatonic positions, including three notes per string stuff), that is not what the word 'mode' means at all.

Thanks for correcting me. I'll look into it.
• '10 Epiphone Les Paul
• '96 Epiphone Rebel EM-1
• '10 Jackson JS32T Rhoads
• Vox Valvetronix VT20+
• Fame GTA40
• Zoom GX7.1u
• Boss MT-2 Metal Zone
• Jim Dunlop Ultex Jazz III 2mm