#1
My band isn't going to have a 2nd guitarist for a gig we're doing at the end of this month. Does anybody know of any amp settings or any audio techniques that can make up for the 2nd guitar? Also any tips on how to make the bass sound bigger?

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#2
There are many ways to make your band sound "fuller". Fuzz is one.
Actually, I go by Dave, but there are already too many Daves on this forum.


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#3
Ahh, I don't like fuzz =/ lol.
Mark Tremonti: I have my own mixer on stage so I can alter my volmes while on stage

Myles Kennedy: And why's that Mark?

Mark Tremonti:....I have trust issues with the sound guy



Selling a Marshall DSL401!
#4
Get a delay pedal and have a short delay on the guitar. Really works wonders if you can play in stereo too.
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#5
really i'd suggest just doing what you normally do. nothing you do is going to make a big enough difference to offset the lack of another guitar. if you could borrow that guitarist's cab and plug it into your amp and spread them across the stage that could help some. having slightly different tones coming from both sides of the stage. that is what i did in my old band where i was the only guitarist. we never sounded thin to my ears.
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#6
Get a splitter and run your board through two amps; one on either side of the stage. Make sure you focus on mid range bite for your guitar tone with a little - LITTLE - thickness on the low mids, and have your bassist round it out.
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#7
Harmonizer or an octaver.

Ethier of those should beef up your sound if your running through a decent rig.
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#8
best advice would be to alter the arrangement of the songs to keep the rhythm parts more prominent. add a little distortion to the bass for that old geezer butler sounding bass to fill up the sound.
#9
Playing in stereo is a tried and tested method of making your sound "bigger" and fuller. Downside is it's expensive.

Two amps, two cabs, and an ABY box.

Alternatively, if you don't use a PA you can mess around with cab placement. Place one cab on one end of the stage and angle it toward the crowd. Place a second cab on the opposite end of the stage, and angle it toward the crowd. The result is that the crowd perceives the sound as "bigger" because they're receiving it from two directions. Of course you'll need some pretty long speaker cables.
#10
i like stereo myself. i always play in a 3 piece, and i have adopted using bigger effects and more amps to help the band sound bigger. it is effective, but it is also intensive; you have to do a bunch of work/practice/buying to make elaborate rigs sound the way you want.

i'd recommend just doing what you normally do as well, it may sound a bit thin but it is easier than trying to re-arrange material and get extra equipment and learn how to use it for a couple of gigs.

edit: using 2 amps would help with projection and a bit of reinforcement. if you use 2 pretty distinct amps you can get a pretty full sound.

here is a clip of my setup:

http://profile.ultimate-guitar.com/gumbilicious/music/play920678
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Last edited by gumbilicious at Aug 2, 2011,
#11
I have a three piece outfit, and we run the lineout of the bass amp into the board, and my eleven rack to my amp and xlr outs to the board. If not xlr, then stereo guitar amp setup.
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#12
Quote by Tokai09
Ahh, I don't like fuzz =/ lol.


GTFO.



But seriously, you might have to buy some pedals unless you just want to deal with it. Most likely it just doesn't sound full to you, because you're used to having two guitarists, but to everyone else it'll sound fine.

I'd check out harmonizer pedal. Or fuzz the bass up a bit

Listen to some Black Keys and your band will start sounding fuller.
#15
Honestly, subtle fuzz will probably make you sound a little bit fuller, nothing over the top though. Also, delay and the way you play will impact it. If you don't already, add octaves to power chords, and see if you can voice your other chords so they sound fuller. And stereo is just cool and immensely helpful for this sort of thing if done right.
#16
I have no real advice, however... Fuzz
I pride myself on my humility.
#17
Quote by -Blue-
Honestly, subtle fuzz will probably make you sound a little bit fuller, nothing over the top though. Also, delay and the way you play will impact it. If you don't already, add octaves to power chords, and see if you can voice your other chords so they sound fuller. And stereo is just cool and immensely helpful for this sort of thing if done right.


+1

Quote by mtshark
I have no real advice, however... Fuzz


It doesn't have to be advice as long as you use the word "fuzz" in your sentance.


#19
Quote by Tokai09
Ahh, I don't like fuzz =/ lol.

Fuzz doesn't like you either.
Actually, I go by Dave, but there are already too many Daves on this forum.


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#20
Honestly, instead of buying tons more equipment just add some reverb. Just a little is good enough give the impression of a louder and fuller sound
#21
A little reverb always helps, if you're not already using it. Some slight chorus will help. Someone else said it before but see if you can mess around with the chords you're playing. If you can try using the open-string voicings and get all 6 strings to ring instead of just playing the power chords. That'll help a lot. I used to play in a 3 piece and I got a lot of inspiration from guys like Alex Lifeson (Rush) and John Pertucci. They're masters of making the guitars sound fuller.
#22
Quote by Excursions707
Honestly, instead of buying tons more equipment just add some reverb. Just a little is good enough give the impression of a louder and fuller sound

Excursions knows, man. you guys are overthinking this :3
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#23
Quote by Zoot Allures
Turn the bass all the way up.

lol. No don't do it! Flab-city!

Fuzz the bass with a bass-oriented fuzzzz! Tune a half-step lower (unless your already in B). Depending on your funding, a second amp would definitely do it. Bring your own to a store and try out some different combinations.

Try playing bigger chords, add that octave, and 5ths or 4ths, 7ths, where applicable.

The reverb thing depends... I don't like adding it in a live tone, for my tech death playing style, as it just makes everything even less articulated (too much picking me thinks If your rocking out like Gumbi there (nice playing/tones BTW) yeah add a bit of reverb ftw
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Last edited by DeathByDestroyr at Aug 3, 2011,
#24
Put Lemmy on bass.
Everyone is entitled to an opinion.

Feel free to express yours so I can make an informed judgement about how stupid you are.
#28
Increase your mids. And maybe a detune pedal.
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Last edited by kutless999 at Aug 3, 2011,
#29
To sound fuller, you need to occupy more sonic space. Pitch shifting and delay in stereo are really good for this application.
#30
Quote by Oldmonkeys

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#31
Quote by DeathByDestroyr
lol. No don't do it! Flab-city!

Fuzz the bass with a bass-oriented fuzzzz! Tune a half-step lower (unless your already in B). Depending on your funding, a second amp would definitely do it. Bring your own to a store and try out some different combinations.

Try playing bigger chords, add that octave, and 5ths or 4ths, 7ths, where applicable.

The reverb thing depends... I don't like adding it in a live tone, for my tech death playing style, as it just makes everything even less articulated (too much picking me thinks If your rocking out like Gumbi there (nice playing/tones BTW) yeah add a bit of reverb ftw

no no no. The bass should always be all the way up.
#32
Not on my amp?
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#34
Quote by Excursions707
Honestly, instead of buying tons more equipment just add some reverb. Just a little is good enough give the impression of a louder and fuller sound



This, a little reverb goes a loooooonnnnggggg way, if my reverb tank didn't buzz like a you know what I would always use it.
#35
Even more important than effects is the arrangement of your songs imo. If he just doubled you than yeah, the above suggestions may work fine. However, if it was more of a rhythm/lead scenario, with one person doing single note lines over the chords, effects probably won't make a huge impact. You may have to rework some of the songs to better suit 1 guitar.
Last edited by danleary at Aug 4, 2011,
#36
I've mainly played in three piece bands and the trick isn't in effects (why does everybody think they can solve everything with a pedal?) it's in the playing. You have to play more and so does the bass player. Listen to what Noel Redding and Jack Bruce would do when used to do when Hendrix and Clapton launched into a lead break. They play more notes to fill in the sound. As for yourself, you just need to boost your level when playing single notes and be careful about long pauses particularly at the start of the solo.
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#37
something i just discovered on my zoom pedal, on a pitch shifter, if you stop the pedal to the same octave as your guitar, is adds a wierd chorus-like effects and is like a millisecond off and acts as a reverb/delay that just makes u sound huge!
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#38
So, to be brutally honest.
Don't use Fuzz, it sounds like complete garbage.
And, as proof, I actually owned the russian Big Muff Pi, it was the WORST sounding pedal I ever heard, it sounded like the neck pickup with the tone all the way down, even on the highest settings.
What would be best is yes, more bass, but also midrange.
Sure, scooped mids enhance the bass/treble more, and make it more, in your face grind, but the midrange adds more volume, in a sense.
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#39
Try throwing me on the drums. I be all clickity clack.
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#40
Quote by Cathbard
I've mainly played in three piece bands and the trick isn't in effects (why does everybody think they can solve everything with a pedal?) it's in the playing. You have to play more and so does the bass player. Listen to what Noel Redding and Jack Bruce would do when used to do when Hendrix and Clapton launched into a lead break. They play more notes to fill in the sound. As for yourself, you just need to boost your level when playing single notes and be careful about long pauses particularly at the start of the solo.
It's all in the playing, not in the equipment.

+1

My buddy has a three piece and they are huge and tight sounding... Mainly because their bassist shreds the living daylights out of every part. If your bassist is just thumping out root notes then no amount of effects will fill out the space.
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