#1
Ok I have had a epi les paul custom for a couple years and use 10 gauge strings. I am buying a jackson with a 25.5" scale length. My les paul is 24.75"


Would 10s on the jackson be a lot harder to bend? Or easier to bend?
#2
Quote by 3reach
Ok I have had a epi les paul custom for a couple years and use 10 gauge strings. I am buying a jackson with a 25.5" scale length. My les paul is 24.75"


Would 10s on the jackson be a lot harder to bend? Or easier to bend?


A bit harder

10s on 24.75 ~= 9s on 25.5
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#4
It will be slightly harder to bend on the Jackson. The reason is that there is more string tension on a 25.5 scale than a 24.75 scale neck.
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#5
I'm guessing the Jackson will likely have a flatter radius as well, which will also make bending a bit harder.
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#6
Quote by LeakyFlask
I'm guessing the Jackson will likely have a flatter radius as well, which will also make bending a bit harder.


Easier in fact, the compound radius of 12"-16" means that bends are easier higher up the neck
#7
Quote by gman128
Easier in fact, the compound radius of 12"-16" means that bends are easier higher up the neck


And won't fret out as quickly
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#9
10s on 24.75" in E standard = 10s on 25.5" in Eb Standard. 09s on 25.5" in E Standard are a little bit looser again. So if you're worried about bending and want to stay in E Standard tuning, go with .09s. If you'd rather use a different tuning, stick with .10s.
#10
Quote by gman128
Easier in fact, the compound radius of 12"-16" means that bends are easier higher up the neck


For some reason I find my Jackson harder to bend on than my LTD/Edwards guitars, which use 13.77" radius fretboard. But maybe that has to do with Jackson using Jumbo frets instead of Extra Jumbo?
#11
Quote by gman128
a bit harder to bend


+1

you could try 9s on the jackson- though in my experience, 9s on 25.5" will feel slacker than 10s on 24.75".
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#12
Quote by Dave_Mc
+1

you could try 9s on the jackson- though in my experience, 9s on 25.5" will feel slacker than 10s on 24.75".


So basically 9's on a 25.5 is = to 9.5 gauge strings on a 24.5 guitar?
#14
yeah, possibly. I've never actually tried 9.5s on 24.75" myself, but I would guess that's in the ballpark. EDIT: ^ yeah if you did the maths then i'm sure that's right.

actually now you mention it some companies do make 9.5s, so they might be worth considering. DR does, and GHS does, I think. Probably some more, but those are the ones I can think of off the top of my head.

Though different companies' strings will feel different, so it wouldn't surprise me if one company's 9s felt similar to another's 9.5s, lol.

That being said it'd probably be worth a try, if you find 10s on 24.75" to be perfect in terms of tension.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

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#15
I bend 11-49s on a 24.75" scale with no problems. And 12-56s on a 25.5" scale are no problem, either. The 11's are in Eb and the 12's are in C#, so that does make a difference, but they're all heavy strings.
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#16
Quote by 3reach
Ok I have had a epi les paul custom for a couple years and use 10 gauge strings. I am buying a jackson with a 25.5" scale length. My les paul is 24.75"


Would 10s on the jackson be a lot harder to bend? Or easier to bend?



IMHO not enough to notice I use 9s on everything.

What does matter is if the Jackson has a Floyd Rose?

Playing with the springs on a floating FR can actually make the easier to bend than a 24.75 scale with a fixed bridge.

As mentioned the Jackson has a compound radius neck so it has a totally different feel than your epi

EDIT:

You fingers are going to hurt no matter what gauge strings you use on the Jackson.

A compound radius neck positions your fingers just a tiny bit differently as you move up and down the neck.

A single radius neck doesn't do this
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#17
Quote by Willowthewitch

Playing with the springs on a floating FR can actually make the easier to bend than a 24.75 scale with a fixed bridge.


Can you go more into depth about this? This is something I've recently been wondering. I HAVE theorized that bending on FR guitars seems a bit easier than on my hardtails, but I have no solid backup reasoning, other than that as you bend, the bridge moves and lessens tension of the strings.

How much of a difference do you think it makes, and what do you mean by "playing with the springs"? Will different floating bridge positions (raised out/sunken in) make bending easier/harder?
Last edited by fixationdarknes at Aug 3, 2011,
#18
some people claim that frs make bending harder because they "give" when you bend, so you have to bend more. other people claim they're easier to bend on for the same reason.

I dunno.

Assuming I'm using my preferred string gauge I don't have much of a problem bending on either FRs or hardtails...
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

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Et tu, br00tz?
#19
Quote by Dave_Mc
some people claim that frs make bending harder because they "give" when you bend, so you have to bend more. other people claim they're easier to bend on for the same reason.


Oh wow I never thought of it that way. Argument can go both ways


Well, actually, what seems to cause me more of a problem is that my string-thru bodied guitars (as opposed to either FR or stoptail) seem to be the hardest to bend. I'm not sure why... would that make any sense if they were harder to bend than FR/stoptail (because you're using more of the string rather than cutting a lot of it off)?
#20
possibly. yeah i think the argument normally is to do with how much string there is past the nut or bridge. again, I dunno
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#21
I have a guitar with a floating bridge, so that actual string length (including the part behind the bridge) is longer than the "sounding" part of the string. I think this makes it harder to bend, in the sense that you have to bend farther to get the same amount of tension increase (due to to extra string behind the bridge).

Related to another comment above, D'Addario makes 9.5 string sets.

One other random thing is that regardless of whether I'm using 9's or 10's, my B string always seems tighter than the G or E. Maybe this is normal, or a function of the brand of strings....
#22
What about comparing brand to brand? Would a pack of DR 9's feel as loose as Ernie Ball 9's? The strings on my RR5 (the one that is hard to bend with) are DR's right now, and the ones on my LTD Alexi600 (much easier to bend) are Ernie Balls. That being said, I used to have Ernie Balls on my RR5 and I don't think it was any easier.

Thoughts?