Page 1 of 2
#1
Hi, I've played for 6 months now, I've learned some pentathonic minor scales, some easy song and two easy solo's (Paranoid & Crazy Train).

Now I've decided to start taking lessons in September (I've earned some money working with my uncle in June and July) to learn music theory.

So I want to learn scales, a lot of scales, to try to start writing my own songs after some lessons.
I own a good book for chords, but I can't find scales fingering, only the position of the notes, so I don't understand how to read them (I don't know anything about theory now)

Can you report me some scales tab and their name? So I can learn them.

Thank you, forgive me for my awful English.
#4
wow you can play crazy train solo after 6 months. you must be one talented dude


I play 3 -4 hours a day nearly every day. Guitar is the best thing happened in my life.

I watched the site, but what are notes I have to hit? al the yellow balls on the fretboard are notes, in what sequence should I play them?
Last edited by The_Flesh_Storm at Aug 3, 2011,
#5
Well, if you have an A Harmonic minor scale, starting at your 5th fret, you'll start at your A, b,c (5, 7, 8) and then to the next string, and so on. Just follow the notes of the scale and try to understand what you're playing.
#7
Basicaly the A natural minor scale is
A-B-C-D-E-F-G

You take a "block" where it starts with "A" and you play every note on the scale, like in this example:

http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php?qqq=5&scch=A&scchnam=Natural+%28Pure%29+Minor&get2=Get&t=0&choice=1

IMHO, it's best to learn the shape as they repeat themselves over the other notes, like the D Major on the 7th position is the same shape:
http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php?qqq=7&scch=D&scchnam=Major&get2=Get&t=0&choice=1

and the A natural minor is literaly the same as the C Major scale.
#8
Major:
1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7

Natural Minor:
1 - 2 - b3 - 4 - 5 - b6 - b7

Harmonic Minor:
1 - 2 - b3 - 4 - 5 - b6 - 7

Melodic Minor:
1 - 2 - b3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7

Major Pentatonic:
1 - 2 - 3 - 5 - 6

Minor Pentatonic:
1 - b3 - 4 - 5 - b7

These will be all you need for a while. I strongly suggest you learn all about the inner workings of the first four scales. The Pentatonics are just a filtered version of Major and Natural Minor.

The numbers refer each note's interval from the tonic (1st degree, the letter the scale is named for.) An unaltered note is a major or perfect interval; the flattened notes are minor intervals. If you are not familiar with intervals, you won't understand scales in the slightest. With this intervallic system of scale notation, you should be able to derive the appropriate scale in any key.

Oh, and if anyone tells you to learn modes or modality, stab them in the gut.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#9
If you are actually going to be taking lessons for music theory...the thing I'd recommend the most right now, is this:
Learn where all the notes on the fretboard are!!!
That will help tremendously...and then you'll be able to see and understand all the scale mumbo jumbo a lot better.
I am a slacker, and don't know all the notes (well I do...but it doesn't come to me instantly)...but I am currently in the process of mending this myself!
Things with strings:
Ibanez J.Custom, Prestiges, RG8, SR5 bass etc
LP's, Strat, Tele
Noiseboxes:
ENGL Retro Tube 50
5150 III 50W
Orange Terror Bass
#10
Hey,

If you're interested in taking lessons, spare yourself the frustration, and visit this website: http://tomhess.net/CorrespondenceGuitarLessons.aspx

There you will literally find the answers to all your problems. I've taken lessons from him for 6 months, and when I started, I was a total, complete beginner (I started playing left-handed instead of right-handed). Now both my scale and sweep picking speed is 360bpm and I've written my own songs and I've jammed with lots of people who have all played for 10 years or more, and they were actually BEHIND me....


So if you want results, go to Tom.


Also, learn ONE scale, and learn how to play it all over the guitar, and improvise with that ONE scale, and know it like the back of your hand. THEN, learn another scale. There's no point learning lots of scales...
#11
So if you want results, go to Tom.


Ok, I'll trust you. Can you tell me how much will it cost? I have problems with credit cards, but if I have not to pay a lot I can join the site.
#12
There are several pricing options available. Before I can explain which option or options is best for you, I would need to know a lot more about you, your experience, your interests, your current skill level, your current challenges, and naturally, your future musical goals..

It's best you relay that information to Tom, by answering the questions in his evaluation form. He'll tell you what is the best course of action from there.

For now, I recommend checking out his articles, his free resources, his assessments, and other music related resources. Those are all FREE!

Right now, I'm enrolled in 3 of his programs, as well as attending a special music event in a month where all his students are invited to jam out and rock hard all night and get free lessons and go out to dinner together! really awesome!

Here, this is where you can get the FREE resources: http://tomhess.net/GuitarPlayingResources.aspx

If you have any other questions, you're free to PM me or anything
#13
Erm, if I give you the price to a specific option, that may not be the right option for you, so I wouldnt want you to make the decision based on price..

If you're worried about how much it will cost, think about what it would cost NOT to get help from him!

With the knowledge I learned from him, I've literally made back 3x the money. He's shown me how to teach!
#14
Maltmn. Stop posting links to Hess. This forum is not your space to whore him out, he does that enough on his own anyway.

The_Flesh_Storm: Ignore what this guys says about Hess, he is massively expensive for the kind of knowledge that you can get from any decent teacher.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#15
Just google - Guitar Scales and you will get more than enough stuff on the internet. No need to stick to a particular site or person. Wikipedia is a good place to start. Lots of authentic stuff in there.
#17
Yesss of course, you can find the same information anywhere online! That is not what a teacher will do for you!

A teacher will show you how to use and apply the knowledge you gain, so that you can integrate the new skills you learn with your guitar playing!

A teacher will analyze your techniques, monitor your progress, and drill you, to make sure you're always practicing efficiently and your mental focus is maintained!

A teacher will also keep you motivated, inspired, and excited about what's going on, and what you're doing, and how you feel about everything that goes into practicing and playing guitar!

that's what a teacher gives you, that you can't find online.
#18
Quote by maltmn
Hey,

If you're interested in taking lessons, spare yourself the frustration, and visit this website: http://tomhess.net/CorrespondenceGuitarLessons.aspx

There you will literally find the answers to all your problems. I've taken lessons from him for 6 months, and when I started, I was a total, complete beginner (I started playing left-handed instead of right-handed). Now both my scale and sweep picking speed is 360bpm and I've written my own songs and I've jammed with lots of people who have all played for 10 years or more, and they were actually BEHIND me....


So if you want results, go to Tom.


Also, learn ONE scale, and learn how to play it all over the guitar, and improvise with that ONE scale, and know it like the back of your hand. THEN, learn another scale. There's no point learning lots of scales...



360BPM sweeping and scale, thats a lie lol.... no one can play that fast

ARE YOU SUPERMAN?!?!?!?
Last edited by ZoaL at Aug 4, 2011,
#19
Quote by maltmn
Hey,

If you're interested in taking lessons, spare yourself the frustration, and visit this website: http://tomhess.net/CorrespondenceGuitarLessons.aspx

There you will literally find the answers to all your problems. I've taken lessons from him for 6 months, and when I started, I was a total, complete beginner (I started playing left-handed instead of right-handed). Now both my scale and sweep picking speed is 360bpm and I've written my own songs and I've jammed with lots of people who have all played for 10 years or more, and they were actually BEHIND me....


So if you want results, go to Tom.


Also, learn ONE scale, and learn how to play it all over the guitar, and improvise with that ONE scale, and know it like the back of your hand. THEN, learn another scale. There's no point learning lots of scales...


I might just save this post for when I need a laugh

TS, found yourself a local guitar teacher and just get some basic lessons to get moving. Find a more specialized teacher later on.

EDIT: Actually, *reported* on the Tom Hess guy. Not only was that advertising but false advertising according to his link to his "school" of guitar. Not even sure if he's allowed to have that in his sig, but either way he's gettin 'ported.

My things:
Bowes SLx7
Washburn WG587
Washburn X40Pro
Washburn X50
Washburn HM24
Washburn WR150
Laguna LE200s
Arietta Acoustic
First Act
Valveking 112
VHT Deliverance

Last edited by valennic at Aug 4, 2011,
#20
Quote by ZoaL
360BPM sweeping and scale, thats a lie lol.... no one can play that fast

ARE YOU SUPERMAN?!?!?!?



It's not a lie, and I'm not superman! I just have a good teacher.

I can show you with some video or something later if you would like...
#21
Remove scale or scales from.A scale model is a physical model, a representation or copy of an object that is larger or smaller than the actual size of the object, which seeks to maintain the relative proportions (the scale factor) of the physical size of the original object. Very often the scale model is used as a guide to making the object in full size. Scale models are built or collected for many reasons.

Professional modelmakers often create models for many professions:

* Engineers who require scale models to test the likely performance of a particular design at an early stage of development without incurring the full expense of a full-sized prototype.
* Architects who require architectural models to evaluate and sell the look of a new construction before it is built.
* Filmmakers who require scale models of objects or sets that cannot be built in full size.
* Salesmen who require scale models to promote new products such as heavy equipment and automobiles and other vehicles.

Hobbyists or amateur modelmakers make die-cast models, injection molded, model railroads, remote control vehicles, wargaming and fantasy collectibles, model ships and ships in bottles for their own enjoyment.
#22
TS, get a local guitar teacher. It's invaluable as a beginner, especially for technique. For theory, there are a lot of sites, including this one, justin guitar, and a few others that can show you the basics of music theory free of charge.

A good teacher is useful because he will be able to spot basic mistakes early on and help you develop good basic technique and encourage good practice habits, both of which are invaluable even to highly advanced players. However, a good teacher for a beginner is not the same as a good teacher for an advanced player. Guys like Tom Hess are not beginner teachers. The stuff they claim to teach is stuff that's reserved for far more advanced players looking to get a very specific kind of help with their playing, not general lessons.

A good teacher for a beginner is going to be someone who is familiar with a number of different styles and simple theory and won't charge you upwards of $1000 per lesson.

If you want advice on finding a teacher beyond that, send Freepower a private message. He's a guitar teacher himself, so he might be the best person to ask on here about that (honestly, he's probably the best person to ask about anything on here).

Quote by maltmn
Hey,

There you will literally find the answers to all your problems. I've taken lessons from him for 6 months, and when I started, I was a total, complete beginner (I started playing left-handed instead of right-handed). Now both my scale and sweep picking speed is 360bpm and I've written my own songs and I've jammed with lots of people who have all played for 10 years or more, and they were actually BEHIND me....

360bpm, but what kind of note? Whole notes? I'll believe that. Quarter notes? I might believe that. Eighth notes or faster? Hell no.

Your claims are completely bullshit. There is not way that your claims are physically possible. You could have the greatest teacher in the universe, but you could not progress that quickly. Speed is a matter or muscle memory and economy of motion. There is no physical way possible that you have developed the muscle memory necessary to make those kinds of small motions at that speed. If you're talking about sixteenth notes at 360 bpm, you are claiming to play at 24 notes per second. That's faster than most any other human being on the planet.

I also take issue with your claim that you are better than players of ten years or more. There is no way that you have the kind of emotional or musical maturity to play beside more experienced musicians and outdo them. As with your speed claims, that just isn't possible. If you practiced 10 hours a day of good practice, you might be hitting around 10 notes per second (way on the outside, but I managed to start clocking speeds near that within a year, so it's not impossible, just ridiculously improbable). However, to do that, you would essentially be an idiot savant of technique - there would be nothing musical about your playing. It would all be mechanical and uninteresting. Going by your teacher's "one scale at a time" theory, you would be stuck in simple major/minor diatonic and pentatonic patterns, unable to use anything but those skills.
#24
Argh, I also mis-worded what I said above.

I started as a right-handed player, when I was a little kid... last year, I injured my hand so I had to switch hands to lefty.

When I started playing lefty, I had already taken a few lessons with Tom, but I had forgotten everything because I spent several months hating everything lol I couldn't play guitar...

So the "emotional groove" might have transferred to my other hand, but that's really the only thing. I had to re-learn from scratch!
#25
Quote by maltmn
Argh, I also mis-worded what I said above.

I started as a right-handed player, when I was a little kid... last year, I injured my hand so I had to switch hands to lefty.

When I started playing lefty, I had already taken a few lessons with Tom, but I had forgotten everything because I spent several months hating everything lol I couldn't play guitar...

So the "emotional groove" might have transferred to my other hand, but that's really the only thing. I had to re-learn from scratch!


Stop talking and back it up: post a video of you playing at your purported top speed. Displaying some musical acumen wouldn't go amiss either since the recordings you choose to display to us are terrible.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#26
Quote by maltmn

Also, learn ONE scale, and learn how to play it all over the guitar, and improvise with that ONE scale, and know it like the back of your hand. THEN, learn another scale. There's no point learning lots of scales...


This is sound advice. Most guitarist only use one or two scales their whole career.
#27
Quote by maltmn
:P

360npm That's 120bpm playing triplets.



...
I've taken lessons from him for 6 months, and when I started, I was a total, complete beginner (I started playing left-handed instead of right-handed). Now both my scale and sweep picking speed is 360bpm
...


Ok, first beats per minutes (BPM) doesn't mean Notes per minutes, these are totally diferent things. If you play "triolets", it's roughly 120bpm and 90 for quadriolets.

TS: Don't lose your money on courses on the internet, you'll have plenty of materials just by getting the "free stuff".

IMHO: First, print out the notes on the fretboard

http://www.studybass.com/tools/chord-scale-note-printer/

go there and select either C Major or A narual minor and print it out.

you'll have a printout of the notes across the board. Then, get the scales and play them! You'll most likely see the "shapes" forming up and recognize them more and more on the tabs you are playing.

If you want to start "easy", you can always try the Panthatonic scales (only 5 notes per scales) and move on afterward.
#28
wtf is that maltmn guy talking about? your body cant even learn to sweep and 360bpm in 6 months...none the less master muting technique and playing it perfectly on distortion...this dudes whacked or he doesn't know shit. A complete beginner and only 6 months. i somehow think he doesn't even know what the 7 modes are in order. or how to play a regular bar chord.


EDIT: or he sucks at explaining.


EDIT2: @TS you can play the full crazy train solo note for note? completely accurate..relaxed with no tension on the fast parts? You can play it perfectly relaxed and hear every note? check that with the scale run at the end. if you tense your not playing accurate.

Just check to make sure you have it PERFECT. dont practice and play something over and over and over if you can't play it perfectly..thats just a making for bad habits while learning songs.
GEARZ

Schecter Hellraiser
TS 808 modded tubescreamer
MXR six band EQ
boss DD-3 digital delay
Boss CE-5 Chorus Ensemble
ISP Decimator
1998 Marshall JCM2000 DSL 100
Avatar 4x12
Last edited by GoodOl'trashbag at Aug 6, 2011,
#29
Quote by GoodOl'trashbag
wtf is that maltmn guy talking about? your body cant even learn to sweep and 360bpm in 6 months...none the less master muting technique and playing it perfectly on distortion...this dudes whacked or he doesn't know shit. A complete beginner and only 6 months. i somehow think he doesn't even know what the 7 modes are in order. or how to play a regular bar chord.


EDIT: or he sucks at explaining.


EDIT2: @TS you can play the full crazy train solo note for note? completely accurate..relaxed with no tension on the fast parts? You can play it perfectly relaxed and hear every note? check that with the scale run at the end. if you tense your not playing accurate.

Just check to make sure you have it PERFECT. dont practice and play something over and over and over if you can't play it perfectly..thats just a making for bad habits while learning songs.

Because that's totally what he should learn during his 6 first months Something that requires profound knowledge of tonal music theory and harmony. Or maybe you're just talking about the names of the modes? That's the only thing about modes he could learn in such a short time.
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
#30
Quote by Flibo
Because that's totally what he should learn during his 6 first months Something that requires profound knowledge of tonal music theory and harmony. Or maybe you're just talking about the names of the modes? That's the only thing about modes he could learn in such a short time.


yeah the names. in there correct musical order though. but i think thats some serious bullshit.
GEARZ

Schecter Hellraiser
TS 808 modded tubescreamer
MXR six band EQ
boss DD-3 digital delay
Boss CE-5 Chorus Ensemble
ISP Decimator
1998 Marshall JCM2000 DSL 100
Avatar 4x12
#32
Quote by maltmn
names and fingerings or just names? lol


Not that either is really any use, for modes to be any good to anyone you need a deep knowledge of both modal and standard tonal theory.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#33
Do you mean like, playing in E Dorian and then switching to E Phrygian? (and feeling that emotional change because of modulation?)

playing in F Lydian and switching to B Locrian?

focusing on emphasizing passing chord tones within the mode you're playing in?

knowing which modes are "major" and which modes are "minor"?
Last edited by maltmn at Aug 7, 2011,
#34
Quote by maltmn
Do you mean like, playing in E Dorian and then switching to E Phrygian? (and feeling that emotional change because of modulation?)

playing in F Lydian and switching to B Locrian?

focusing on emphasizing passing chord tones within the mode you're playing in?

knowing which modes are "major" and which modes are "minor"?


...if i was in the key of C major, and the harmony was a D minor chord, what would be played over it?
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#38
Quote by maltmn
Oh I just reached a new max speed of 450 npm


No one cares. You go now.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#39
Quote by maltmn
Oh I just reached a new max speed of 450 npm



u suck
Page 1 of 2