#1
Ok guys, I'm taking apart this old Yamaha soundboard for the parts, and I want to get these chips out of it (4558DY JRC 9005 and 9006) which there's about 30-40 of em in total.

What's the best way, I have my crappy soldering iron, and a little tool that helps you grab leads and pull things off the board.

Also, are these chips worth the effort? What can I use them for?
#2
for best results you'll need a desoldering pump,

the 4558 is probably a low slew dual op-amp, they're popular in overdrives, no idea about the others I cannot find any info about them so maybe you misread them?

you shouldn't leave your iron in contact for more than 10 seconds (I normally use 5 seconds for safety) without letting it cool down completely as it can damage the chip, and that's just wasted effort
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#3
Well, I managed to get one out, but I had to keep it there longer than 10 seconds, they are rather difficult to get out when they are already soldered to a board.

Edit, I've found a way....it's a really bad way, but it works. I'm just breaking the board around the chip, since I don't need the board, and I'll just solder to the underside of the board chip if I use it Rednecking it.
Last edited by ethan_hanus at Aug 3, 2011,
#4
once again... desoldering pump....
Epiphone Les Paul Plus Top
Jet City JCA5212RC (SLO Modded)
Ibanez WD7 Wah
Mad Professor Sweet Honey Overdrive
TC Electronic Flashback Triple Delay
TC Electronic Trinity Reverb
#5
desoldering pumps and braids work. that's what you should be using.
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#6
Get some desoldering braid and a bit of gel flux. Dip the end of the braid in flux, put the braid between the iron and the solder. It should get it up pretty fast.

Cut the braid as it sucks up solder.
#8
if i were you i wouldn't bother, by the sounds of the gear you have for doing this job you will more than likely destroy any re usable chips and besides why bother salvaging them if you don't even know what you are going to do with them or what they are for.
#9
Quote by tobuei
if i were you i wouldn't bother, by the sounds of the gear you have for doing this job you will more than likely destroy any re usable chips and besides why bother salvaging them if you don't even know what you are going to do with them or what they are for.



Pedal building, there's alot of high quality parts in this board, so I'm gonna see if I can use the parts to build pedals or something. The chips must do something important cause there's a bunch of them.
#10
Are you putting fresh solder on the solder pads to help make the old solder flow?
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#11
Quote by tobuei
if i were you i wouldn't bother, by the sounds of the gear you have for doing this job you will more than likely destroy any re usable chips and besides why bother salvaging them if you don't even know what you are going to do with them or what they are for.

I've salvaged tons of parts form when i was first starting out (a long time ago indeed) and now that I'm building more and more, I have nedded a great deal of those parts that i originally salvaged "just in case".
#13
Grab some tongs, hold the board with them over your stove to melt the solder. Don't let it catch on fire. Quickly flip the board over and smack it on the counter. Most of the parts should come off if you did it right.

Sounds ridiculous I know... It was recommended to me but I tried it myself and it works.

*I'm not responsible if you burn your arm off or burn your house down.
#14
Quote by CECamps
Chipquik is by far and away the easiest method. Solder pumps, wicking, and other methods are way more difficult in comparison IMHO.

http://www.chipquik.com/


Quickchip? Tell me more about this, sounds worth the money.


Yeah, there's a tone of good stuff in this board, here's a pic of what I've collected thus far that would fit in my box.



Got black caps, orange caps, green caps, blue resistors, tan resistors, a few diodes, some light diodes, variable sliders, crap load of pots in values of 10k, 25k, 50k, and 100k, and some pots which have two traces in one pot, so it can control two functions at the same time, a bunch of XLR inputs with wire and a plug on them, bunch of those 4556D JCR chips, and a few 2068DD JCR chips, a bunch of plug ends, some transistor output chips, a few fuse holders, and a bunch of other crap.

I'm going to try and make a solderless hookup system for my guitar using those plug ends, I've always wanted one..

EDIT: I also forgot to mention this huge transformer I got out of it, weighs like 2-3 pounds, huge.
Last edited by ethan_hanus at Aug 4, 2011,
#16
Ethan, Chipquik is very simple to use for removing surface mount chips. It's basically a solder which has a low melting point. This means it stays molten for a while after it is heated with the iron.

To remove a chip with it, you'd run some flux across all the pins of the chip, then melt the Chipquik over all the pins. Once all the pins are covered, you'll heat all the sides fairly quickly (usually passing over each side of the chip two or three times) and slide the chip off the pads with something like an orange wood stick or similar dowel.

Once the chip is off, you can easily clean the pins by fluxing them and running a clean iron tip across them as you would if you were drag soldering.
#17
Quote by CECamps
Chipquik is by far and away the easiest method. Solder pumps, wicking, and other methods are way more difficult in comparison IMHO.

http://www.chipquik.com/


By the time you get the chip off, and remove all of the solder that bridged the pins I'll have an entire board done with braid :p

If you know how to use braid there is nothing better. Chipquik is great for getting an MCU off of a board, but in the process you usually ruin it if the unused pins are all connected to ground.

For this stuff it wouldn't really have a chance to destroy stuff.
#18
Quote by XgamerGt04
By the time you get the chip off, and remove all of the solder that bridged the pins I'll have an entire board done with braid :p

If you know how to use braid there is nothing better. Chipquik is great for getting an MCU off of a board, but in the process you usually ruin it if the unused pins are all connected to ground.

For this stuff it wouldn't really have a chance to destroy stuff.


I can have most any chip off and pins cleaned in around a minute. I know how to use braid very well and definitely wouldn't choose it over Chipquik for an SMD chip. But as they say, to each his own.
#19
Quote by AcousticMirror
looks like a good 20-30 dollars worth of stuff.


Maybe, but now I got a bunch of stuff to play around with, for free.

Thanks for the link CEClamps, I'll look into it. I think I need a new iron, I had to grind the point yesterday because it decided to go concave on me.
#20
Quote by CECamps
I can have most any chip off and pins cleaned in around a minute. I know how to use braid very well and definitely wouldn't choose it over Chipquik for an SMD chip. But as they say, to each his own.



I'll just use a heated air blower and flux anyway.

The chipquik will work, but you do need a new iron or new tip. Never cleab an iron tip by grinding it. You grind the plating off and then it can't stay tinned.
Last edited by XgamerGt04 at Aug 4, 2011,
#21
i just heat the whole thing and start ripping things apart.

then i throw the board away.

great stress reliever. stupid pcb.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#22
Quote by XgamerGt04
I'll just use a heated air blower and flux anyway.

The chipquik will work, but you do need a new iron or new tip. Never cleab an iron tip by grinding it. You grind the plating off and then it can't stay tinned.


Well, the iron I'm using is one of those old timey ones, like, 70's or early 80's soldering iron, idk, it's old as heck, and only works at one specific point on the tip, every other part of the tip wont melt the solder, it's retarded. The tip is slowly getting shorter the longer I use it, and that's not from grinding it down.


AM^ I'm just ripping the PCB apart around the chips with a pair of needle nose pliers, and then wiggling the chip until the leads on the opposite side break. I'll never be able to solder it onto another PCB board, but I plan on hand wiring everything I build anyways.