#1
Usually I'm pretty good with not creating these little "clicks" or whatever you wanna call them, but occasionally I'll get one thats a little noticable... Even most of these just sound like fuzziness like on an analog recording, but once in a while there's the one that you can tell that that track has been cut, pasted, whatever. I hope you guys know what I'm talking about. Is there any good ways to disguise these in the recordings? Any tips would be great
#2
I usually re-record a bit of the previous take then drag the start of the new take to a place with similar waveforms, then do a slight fade-in.
#3
Use a crossfade. One fades in whilst the other fades out. Do this very quickly - the crossfade should last about one tenth of a second.
Rock [James] Roll
#4
Depends on the instrument and mix. Cross-fading helps a lot and finding a good place to edit is important. Try to put the transitions right after a loud part, like right after a snare hit, when possible.
#5
Well, at the moment this recording is on a multitrack recorder so I doubt if I can crossfade on it... For example this is what I had done... I noticed I had messed up on a part so I recorded the same thing on a different track and then moved it over to the first track so it's kinda like this:

111111111 recorded first track
222222222 recorded second track
112222211 second track pasted into first track

And there the 2's start is where it clicks (kind of a crude example )... Most of the time I hide them well but in this one it's somewhat obvious.
#7
The problem occurs because you start or stop recording at a non-zero crossing in the waveform. In other words, where the sound begins and ends is not at a '0 volume' point, where there would be no audible pop, so as a result you get a clicking sound because the sound has to try and jump infinitely fast (which isn't possible) from 0 amplitude to whatever amplitude the first sample starts at.

If you're still struggling to understand the concept, picture a sound wave as having to start from a standstill (i.e vibration on a string begins only when something makes it vibrate at that pitch) which would be your zero point, as it is (theoretically, for this example) not making any sound pressure waves until it is 'created'. Now imagine you try to create a sound wave that already starts louder than '0' by plucking a string very hard and fast... you'll often get a sudden twang. That is your popping noise.


Anyway, I'd imagine the recorder must have some setting somewhere to let you begin recording at the nearest zero crossing to where you want it to (there are thousands of them a second for most waveforms), or at the very least crossfade between takes if you merge a track? Look in the manual or the manufacturer's forum (if one exists), as I don't use multi-track recorders and don't intend to any time soon so cannot help further. In a DAW you would simply crossfade in and out of takes, and/or set the DAW to search for zero crossings whenever you make a cut.
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#8
Quote by DisarmGoliath
The problem occurs because you start or stop recording at a non-zero crossing in the waveform. In other words, where the sound begins and ends is not at a '0 volume' point, where there would be no audible pop, so as a result you get a clicking sound because the sound has to try and jump infinitely fast (which isn't possible) from 0 amplitude to whatever amplitude the first sample starts at.

If you're still struggling to understand the concept, picture a sound wave as having to start from a standstill (i.e vibration on a string begins only when something makes it vibrate at that pitch) which would be your zero point, as it is (theoretically, for this example) not making any sound pressure waves until it is 'created'. Now imagine you try to create a sound wave that already starts louder than '0' by plucking a string very hard and fast... you'll often get a sudden twang. That is your popping noise.


Anyway, I'd imagine the recorder must have some setting somewhere to let you begin recording at the nearest zero crossing to where you want it to (there are thousands of them a second for most waveforms), or at the very least crossfade between takes if you merge a track? Look in the manual or the manufacturer's forum (if one exists), as I don't use multi-track recorders and don't intend to any time soon so cannot help further. In a DAW you would simply crossfade in and out of takes, and/or set the DAW to search for zero crossings whenever you make a cut.


Ok, I get what you're saying... It's kinda like if you were in a stopped car and then tried to immediately reach top speed right? Not exactly the same thing, but I always understand things better in analogies

Well, I got an idea... As I can't see the wavelengths on the recorder, once I'm done with the rest of the song, I'll record into another track that little part, export everything onto my computer and then zoom in on the wavelengths and insert the little part into the actual track.
#9
Quote by ItsOnlyGNR
Ok, I get what you're saying... It's kinda like if you were in a stopped car and then tried to immediately reach top speed right? Not exactly the same thing, but I always understand things better in analogies

Well, I got an idea... As I can't see the wavelengths on the recorder, once I'm done with the rest of the song, I'll record into another track that little part, export everything onto my computer and then zoom in on the wavelengths and insert the little part into the actual track.

Yeah, pretty much - and that should work fine, all you have to do is zoom in and then cut at a point where the waveform is at 0 amplitude (i.e on the middle line between going up and down ) and you shouldn't get the popping sound any more. A cross fade in can also help anyway, so there's less of a sudden volume change when the new track comes in.
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