#1
K so i'm recording rough guitar tracks for my new drummer to play along with and the guitar is to boomy. I'm using a the tube screamer and compressor (all compressor settings are at 12 o clock) on my boss gt-10, then through a mesa dual rec. Treble is at 6, bass 5.5, mids 5, presence 5, gain 6, master and output are on 5 and i am using the send knob down low for low volume recording. I'm using an sm58 in my m-audio box, when ever i play palm muted notes on the higher frets they drives the signal to high and it gets. Just need some suggestions as to what i should do, turning the bass down doesn't help. I have the mic at the center between the center of the cone and the edge of it.
#2
Bolding your problems...
Quote by maowcat
K so i'm recording rough guitar tracks for my new drummer to play along with and the guitar is to boomy. I'm using a the tube screamer and compressor (all compressor settings are at 12 o clock) on my boss gt-10, then through a mesa dual rec. Treble is at 6, bass 5.5, mids 5, presence 5, gain 6, master and output are on 5 and i am using the send knob down low for low volume recording. I'm using an sm58 in my m-audio box, when ever i play palm muted notes on the higher frets they drives the signal to high and it gets. Just need some suggestions as to what i should do, turning the bass down doesn't help. I have the mic at the center between the center of the cone and the edge of it.



Anyway, the 'send knob down low' thing confuses me, but ignoring that:

Turn the bass down, it does make a difference, trust me. Then move the mic closer to the centre of the speaker for a brighter tone, and either adjust EQ by recording and listening back/monitoring in headphones, or preferably getting your head down low and level with the speaker and adjusting from near the mic position.

Also, low palm-muted chugs do create huge boomy low end transients. That's why you roll off the bass, and possibly raise the cab off the floor if you can, on something solid and dense, to reduce the vibrations from the low end.


See if any of that helps anyway, good luck.

Edit: Oh, and learn how to use a compressor before actually applying one, or you'll probably make things work. Distorted guitars don't need much, if any, compression anyway and if you were to compress them I'd suggest a fast attack setting, slow-ish release and a ratio of no more than 4:1 really. Have the threshold set so you're only compressing the high-level sounds, but tbh this won't solve the problem of boomy low end when placed before the amp so I dunno why you'd even bother - a compressor in your DAW might help a little, but EQ would be better at the task anyway, and multi-band compression to only tackle the low end... this is why I hate the guitar pedal compressors - they encourage foolish use of compression.

P.S I'm tired, probably rambled a lot and I'd be surprised if even I understand it when I re-read after some sleep - enjoy
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
Last edited by DisarmGoliath at Aug 3, 2011,
#3
My low palms mutes are fine, it's when i palm mute on the high frets of all places, tenth and twelfth specifically. And i just did everything you said, which i've already tried before, and it's no different. Sounds different obviously but it's still pretty boomy. And turning the send knob on the back of a dual rec works as a power attenuator.

Edit: And i know how to use a compressor, i just like the flat settings on it coincidentally, not sure why though
Last edited by maowcat at Aug 3, 2011,
#4
Why would you use the GT-10? And why would you use the compressor? I'd imagine that one/both of those are the problems.
Call me Andrew. It's my name.

Quote by theogonia777
i fond God too, man! i sat next to him on the bus once. he told be the meaning of life and then gave me a pretzel. i can't remember what the meaning of live was, but it was a good pretzel, man!
#5
Quote by maowcat
My low palms mutes are fine, it's when i palm mute on the high frets of all places, tenth and twelfth specifically. And i just did everything you said, which i've already tried before, and it's no different. Sounds different obviously but it's still pretty boomy.

Then the problem is a resonance issue, which could be from a number of reasons. Adjust your technique if you can, to reduce the weight of mutes on those frets, and perhaps check the setup of the guitar when you get the chance.

And turning the send knob on the back of a dual rec works as a power attenuator.

Gotcha, fair enough.


Edit: And i know how to use a compressor, i just like the flat settings on it coincidentally, not sure why though

Then why are you throwing a (presumably poor quality) one in front of your amp in the recording chain? What can you possibly hope to achieve by doing so, if you're already going to use distortion?
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
Last edited by DisarmGoliath at Aug 3, 2011,
#6
Quote by GoIrish668
Why would you use the GT-10? And why would you use the compressor? I'd imagine that one/both of those are the problems.


The tube screamer tightens the bass up and the compressor makes a slight tonal difference. I can't stand the sound of a dual rec on it's own, the bass is either two much or too little, with the tube screamer it tights the bass up perfectly.
Last edited by maowcat at Aug 3, 2011,
#7
Quote by DisarmGoliath

Then why are you throwing a (presumably poor quality) one in front of your amp in the recording chain? What can you possibly hope to achieve by doing so, if you're already going to use distortion?


i accidentally turned it on one day and it gave a little something to my chords so i left it like that, if it sounds good i keep it on, simple as that. And the effects on the gt-10 are great, amp models blow though.
#8
I'm an idiot, I didn't read the part about the TS and the compressor being INSIDE the GT-10.

Anyway, a Tube Screamer sim is going to sound much different than an actual Tube Screamer. And you should only be using light compression on a distorted guitar.

Ideally, you should get a real Tube Screamer to put in front of your Dual Rec, because it is a very good amp, and running your guitar through some digital multi-effects pedal won't sound nearly as good as running it into an overdriven tube amp.
Call me Andrew. It's my name.

Quote by theogonia777
i fond God too, man! i sat next to him on the bus once. he told be the meaning of life and then gave me a pretzel. i can't remember what the meaning of live was, but it was a good pretzel, man!
#9
Quote by GoIrish668
I'm an idiot, I didn't read the part about the TS and the compressor being INSIDE the GT-10.

Anyway, a Tube Screamer sim is going to sound much different than an actual Tube Screamer. And you should only be using light compression on a distorted guitar.

Ideally, you should get a real Tube Screamer to put in front of your Dual Rec, because it is a very good amp, and running your guitar through some digital multi-effects pedal won't sound nearly as good as running it into an overdriven tube amp.


I know i should be using a real TS but i need to buy my own amp first the dual rec is my rhythm guitar players.