#1
and it's on local music scenes, and jam nights and stuff.

How your local 'scene' performs is down a lot to how it is perceived. Basically, if the general public feels that there aren't any good bands in Placeville, then the scene is Placeville is likely gonna suck.

A lot of the time, all it takes for a member of the public to form an impression of what 'local bands' are like is a few minutes in a dingy pub. So, if the entertainment is rubbish, then that person COULD go away thinking that Placeville doesn't have any good local bands. I've got a couple of friends who have had this experience.

So, to get people coming out to shows you need to put talent on your bill. The problem is, people have still got to be given a chance to prove themselves.

My point is that while it's all very well saying that it's mean to be a bit elitist and selective, sometimes it's the best thing for the local scene. If people are prepared to accept crap, then all you're gonna get is crap, show qualities will be consistently poor and attendances will be low.

Open mic and jam nights are, sadly, the place that a lot of bands belong either until they polish their act or (in some cases) realise that they're not any good. YES this all sounds very harsh, but for the hard-working, professional bands there's nothing more counter productive than a scene which routinely churns out diabolical rubbish and thinks it acceptable.

Playing round the UK, the difference in quality between one area and the next is astounding, and it's all down to venues/promoters/bands being choosy and not standing for crap. Everyone needs a stage to showcase their talents, but it should not be at the expense of the other artists around them.

Yeah...does anyone get where I'm coming from here?
Quote by Nightmare_xxx
to be honest, I thought they were awful. I mean some of the songs our drummer's written was better than their stuff.
Last edited by hadesdaman at Aug 4, 2011,
#4
I hear ya. Where i live, the local scene is saturated with well below par bands - and also the number of gigs to population ratio is ridiculous. No one turns up to shows because there are so many gigs on each week and too few people to see them.

But there is an upside to this.
a) any band that is actually any good, immediately appears to be even better compared to the local crap
b) When there is a good lineup, a lot of people turn up to it.

Our local scene didnt have too many decent venues either, but as our town becomes more populated some bigger venues are giving local unsigned bands a chance. Its getting better, but still annoying how the market selfdestructs by way of not having standards and saturation of gigs.
Always waiting for that bit of inspiration.
#5

Just had too.

My local scene sucks because THERE IS NO METAL. WHERE IS THE METAL?
METAL!
#6
Quote by Ultraussie

Just had too.

My local scene sucks because THERE IS NO METAL. WHERE IS THE METAL?


Well that's strange... My local scene sucks because there's too MUCH metal, and it's all the same generic metalcore crap. Nothing really distinguishable from band to band.
#7
I don't get it. You're right about most of it, but at the end of the day The Open mic scene =/= the real gig scene.

Musicians, their closest friends, random drunks that happen to be there, and the super hip are the only ones who go to open mic stuff and they're not going to be turned off to a whole scene (or even crappy music) because they saw some bad bands at one.

All the regular patrons that actually pay a cover to see a gig aren't going to open mics in the first place, they're going to shows that aren't going to have the crappiest bands anyway because bar owners and booking people (again unless it's a bar for the super hip) rarely book anyone that doesn't play well enough to pull in a large, drunk crowd.

Likewise a professional band that's making good money doesn't show up at an open mic for any reason other than to network and to just be supportive of the local music community.

The two don't really cross over much IME, so it's not even an issue.

And don't sweat coming down to hard: "elitism" gets overused. There's nothing elitist about criticizing and limiting the shows of a band that's doing a bad job. In fact, if they're good at listening to criticism, that's how they get better.
#8
Quote by hadesdaman

My point is that while it's all very well saying that it's mean to be a bit elitist and selective, sometimes it's the best thing for the local scene. If people are prepared to accept crap, then all you're gonna get is crap, show qualities will be consistently poor and attendances will be low.

Open mic and jam nights are, sadly, the place that a lot of bands belong either until they polish their act or (in some cases) realise that they're not any good. YES this all sounds very harsh, but for the hard-working, professional bands there's nothing more counter productive than a scene which routinely churns out diabolical rubbish and thinks it acceptable.

I coudn't disagree more.

Y'see, music, like any other art form, is objective, what is crap to one person is great stuff to someone else, and so it should be, it'd be a boring old world if we all liked and hated the same stuff.
With that in mind, if you don't like any of the bands in a particular scene, bands that others find perfectly acceptable, then it's you that has the problem, not the scene.

Fair enough, some local scenes may lack bands with what most of us would define as 'exeptional talent', but at least they are honest scenes, kids using what they have to make music and 'have a go' at playing gigs and writing material, and from honest scenes like that can eventualy come great things. What generally happens in a local scene is that all the bands and musicians in that scene are influenced by each other, and from that original new sounds develop, for instance, the 'grunge' thing from Seattle, or the 'Madchester' sound from Manchester. Hell, the whole punk thing started with untalented kids in the 70s who were sick of the whole elitist crap in music.

Y'know what'd be worse than a weak scene? A scene where only the the exeptional and highly talented 'professional' musicians get to play gigs. It'd soon get boring and stagnated. A scene needs places where beginners get to play, to try out stuff and experiment with sounds, to learn the craft of gigging.
And with beginners, you obviously can't expect exeptional quality, that comes later with 'experience'. What you can expect though is 100% dedication and effort, 'heart' for want of a better word, and that should be applauded and encouraged because it's those beginners of today that will shape the music of tomorrow and become the exeptional players that you love so much.

Everyone has to start somewhere, we all have to put our foot on that first rung of the ladder so to speak, everyone has to make their mistakes and learn from them and have the chance to discover what works and what doesn't for themselves and gain 'experience', but if scenes remove the bottom rungs in favour of those that are further up the ladder, new talent will cease to develop on a large scale and music in general will become boring.
#9


Y'see, music, like any other art form, is objective, what is crap to one person is great stuff to someone else, and so it should be, it'd be a boring old world if we all liked and hated the same stuff.


Subjective, surely?

Y'know what'd be worse than a weak scene? A scene where only the the exeptional and highly talented 'professional' musicians get to play gigs. It'd soon get boring and stagnated. A scene needs places where beginners get to play, to try out stuff and experiment with sounds, to learn the craft of gigging.


Abso-feckin'-lutely. Where do those players come from? Are they born with the ability to do an amazing live set? Do they sit around in their bedrooms for years honing their skills before they can get their first gig? Should a band have a perfectly polished and prepared show before ever stepping onto a stage?

If you're judging the music scene in a town based on one or two gigs, rather than judging one or two gigs based on one or two gigs, you're making an error. Any town has twenty or thirty bands who want to be big. One of them might be actually commercially successful. You can't demand that only that one band plays gigs in that town.
#10
You should be happy you have a music scene...
I have 1 friend who plays guitar, and he is all busy and stuff.
No kid I know who plays bass or drums
#11
Quote by Samzawadi
Subjective, surely?

More than likely, I was very stoned when I wrote that, but I stand by every word I said... apart from 'objective' of course.


Quote by Samzawadi

Abso-feckin'-lutely. Where do those players come from? Are they born with the ability to do an amazing live set? Do they sit around in their bedrooms for years honing their skills before they can get their first gig? Should a band have a perfectly polished and prepared show before ever stepping onto a stage?

Precisely, it's all about gaining experience. You wanna be a good chess player? Then you play lots and lots of chess. You wanna be a good painter? Then you paint every spare hour you've got, and if you wanna be a good guitar player, then you play guitar as much as you can and you gain the experience from all that playing and that's what makes you good.

And there's something else that many people overlook, lots of people think that being damn good at playing your instrument automaticaly transfers into being able to play great gigs, but that's not really the case. Playing lots of guitar in your bedroom makes you damn good at playing guitar in your bedroom, practicing with a band a lot makes you damn good at playing with a band, but in order to get good at playing gigs (which is a slightly different discipline to just jamming in a rehearsal room) you need to play lots of gigs first so that you can gain 'gigging experience'. Without any venues for the inexperienced to gain experience then obviously great gigging bands will gradualy become rarer and rarer, because as we all know, most bands have a limited shelf life so most of the great gigging bands of today will not be around in a few years time.
Gigging scenes everywhere rely on places for the young and inexperienced to gain experience at gigging, without places like that constantly supplying the scene with new blood, the scenes eventualy dry up and die.
Quote by Samzawadi

If you're judging the music scene in a town based on one or two gigs, rather than judging one or two gigs based on one or two gigs, you're making an error. Any town has twenty or thirty bands who want to be big. One of them might be actually commercially successful. You can't demand that only that one band plays gigs in that town.

Agreed.