#1
hey, just wondering why should I oil my fretboard on whats the best way to do it. This is the first time i may oil my gibson sg faded.

Thanks.

Cheers,
Jimmi.
#2
Dunlop lemon oil.
Guitars:
- Gibson SG Standard
- Lag Roxane 500
- Eastwood Hi-Flyer
- Takamine EG523

Amplifiers:
- Jet City JCA50H
- George Dennis 60Watt The Blue Combo
- Marshall SuperBass 100Watt
#3
take strings off, lemon oil on (try dunlop 65), leave it there for 10-30 minutes, then wipe any excess off, clean any crap on there off with a tissue or a soft plectrum, and restring.
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#4
thanks everyone, but why should I do it? I mean everyone says you should but what are the benefits. Also, if my SG is faded will that affect it? Same for the fingerboard wood.

Cheers,
Jimmi.
#5
The oil keeps the fretboard from drying out. If it dries out, it tends to crack. Also, the oil will clean off all the sweat and residue off the fretboard that gets on there from playing.
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#6
Quote by GibsonMan321
The oil keeps the fretboard from drying out. If it dries out, it tends to crack. Also, the oil will clean off all the sweat and residue off the fretboard that gets on there from playing.


thanks.
#7
Actually fretboard oiling is overhyped! The wood is dried on purpose buy the guitar manufacturer and in the scheme of things oiling boards is fairly new and often overdone as well. Oil is not for cleaning, it is for conditioning and that means apply sparingly and wipe off excess immediately. The board should not look wet or shiny.
The people who over oil their boards will wonder why their frets pop out late on.
Moving on.....
#8
Be aware that most "Lemon oils" are no more than lemon-scented mineral oil. Mineral oil merely coats the surface, giving it a bright sheen, but does not penetrate the wood. This oil prevents absorption by a plant oil after the fact. This includes most bore oils, but not all. Read the label. Most so-called fretboard treatments and bore oils are no more than inexpensive mineral oil with a scent added, like lemon.

Check into Fret Doctor. It's amazing. I have no affiliation. http://www.beafifer.com/boredoctor.htm
#9
Yeah make sure to use a proper lemon oil or simialr product, one that is actually developed for conditioning fretboards and not just some general wood conditioner with yellow dye in it. Dunlop 65 and Gibson's stuff is what I use. You want to just put a tiny squirt of it on. Use about half of what you think you need. A little oil goes a very long way and fretboards don't need much oil. Work it in with a clean cotton cloth, give it about thirty seconds and then wipe it down again. There shouldn't be any excess and the fretboard shouldn't end up looking glossy or wet. If it does then you've used way too much oil. Try to not work it in too much around the frets, nut and binding. If you have those big block or trapezoid inlays then don't bother putting any oil on those positions at all since those parts are more plastic than wood.

Remember that less is very much more with oil and most fretboards will only benefit from oiling once every year and a bit. If you play a lot then you need to oil it even less since the oils in your skin will keep it as fresh as it needs. Remember that too much oil WILL damage your fretboard, sometimes beyond repair. If you're in doubt then don't oil it at all. Nobody bothered oiling fguitar fretboards until the mid 80s really and none of those dried up 50s guitars had any problems.