#1
Hi,

Just finished making an electric guitar. I've never done it before so I was a little worried about the wiring and sure enough something seems to have gone wrong.

I followed a wiring diagram I found on the internet (I'm using 2 Wilkinson humbuckers if that helps)
When I plug one of the volume pots doesn't work and I get a really really loud hum which decreases slightly if I touch a metal part such as the jack.

I've read lots of threads and looked at diagrams but I'm not that literate when it comes to electronics.

Could someone please tell be what I should change? I've attached a (poorly drawn) diagram of exactly what I have done

Thanks

Image at: http://www.flickr.com/photos/65986541@N03/6008053905/
#2
Hello there,

Nice to see someone stepping out and giving guitar building a shot.

Try following this: http://www.seymourduncan.com/support/wiring-diagrams/schematics.php?schematic=2h_2v_2t_3w

Seeing as you're getting a hum and it decreases when you touch it, there's most likely a grounding issue. When you touch the electronics you are probably grounding it.

Also, remember to ground to the guitar's bridge.
Yeah, now you're gonna die wearing that stupid little hat. How does it feel?

Help me to live.


I make custom guitar wiring harnesses and I'm pretty damn good at it!
#3
Hi

Thanks so much for replying. I did read in many places that I should ground the bridge, but I didnt really know why, any ideas?

Yeah I just thought it would give me something to do over the summer. It all went really well until I came to this bit.

Thanks for the diagrams, one question. I have taped off the white and red as shown already, and I have a yellow instead of green but I assume there the same thing. I don't however have any bare wires coming from the pickups or included in my wiring kit??

Cheer
#4
Is there any kind of braided shield around your other wires?
Acoustics:
1994 Seagull SM6
2007 Takamine G5013SVFT

Electrics:
2008 Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plain Top (Cherryburst)
1964 Gibson Melody Maker D (DC)

Amps:
Traynor YGL-1

Pedals
MXR Distortion III (C4 Modded)
#5
Quote by ncik_w
Hi

Thanks so much for replying. I did read in many places that I should ground the bridge, but I didnt really know why, any ideas?

Yeah I just thought it would give me something to do over the summer. It all went really well until I came to this bit.

Thanks for the diagrams, one question. I have taped off the white and red as shown already, and I have a yellow instead of green but I assume there the same thing. I don't however have any bare wires coming from the pickups or included in my wiring kit??

Cheer


Grounding to the bridge essentially grounds the electrics to the strings.

So are there only three wires from each humbucker?
There should be 4, two of which get linked together, a hot wire and a ground.


EDIT: This is the key for wilkinson humbuckers.

Wiring -Thin Black = Live
Thick black/ Silver = Ground
Red & white = Coil Tap (Joined for normal operation)


So when using the Seymour Duncan schematic:

Thin black = Black = Live
Thick black/silver = Green = Ground
Yeah, now you're gonna die wearing that stupid little hat. How does it feel?

Help me to live.


I make custom guitar wiring harnesses and I'm pretty damn good at it!
Last edited by flyingmarlin at Aug 4, 2011,
#6
I have a thin red, thin white, thick black and thin yellow. Red and white are taped off. I've been using the thick black as the live and thin yellow as the ground as this seemed to be what I found elsewhere but I guess it should probably be the other way around??

Why is it that the electrics need to be grounded to the strings? Sorry for what is probably a stupid question

Thanks
#7
electronics are grounded so that the strings and their small electic current can change the magnetic flux of the pickup, i think that is, not totally sure
#8
also, if you ground the whole thing, the volume pot will work again because your whole circuit relies on the grounding
sorry for the double post by the way
#9
That's the only thing that I could have assumed was the case but it doesn't really make sense because any conducting wire, i.e. a string, would move in the magnetic field of the pickups thus induce an electrical current in the circuit.
#10
http://alexplorer.net/guitar/basics/grounding.html

You can think of a ground as an "sink" that electrical noise runs down. If your sink is stopped up or there's something in the drain, then you're going to hear an annoying hum or buzz, much like you do already when you have a single coil pickup selected by itself, only much louder. Often, you can act as the ground by touching the guitar strings if you have a loose wire somewhere.
Yeah, now you're gonna die wearing that stupid little hat. How does it feel?

Help me to live.


I make custom guitar wiring harnesses and I'm pretty damn good at it!