#1
Sometimes I hear guitarists describe a chord as a note over a note. For example , A over C# or A/C#. What does this over something mean and there is any general rule of thumb that you could apply to these notes in order to be able to figure out how to play them? When I go to sites that give you the fingering for all of the chords such as 8notes.com, there is nothing for these notes.
-Mike
#2
A/C# is a basic A chord, with a C# played as the bass note as shown below:

E - 0
B - 2
G - 2
D - 2
A - 4
E - x
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#3
A chord like A/C# ("A over C#") is an example of an inverted chord. The "over C#" part means that a C# note will be the lowest sounding note in the chord.

An "A" major chord contains the notes A, C#, and E. If you were to play it as a simple triad, you would typically play it as A being the lowest note, C# being the next highest, and E being the highest note. With an "A/C#" you would still play A,C#, and E, but C# would be the lowest sounding note. Generally, but not as a rule, it would be played C# (lowest), E, and then A (Highest sounding note)

A typical voicing for this chord on guitar is (low to high) x42220
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Last edited by Freeze1186 at Aug 4, 2011,
#4
Quote by GaryHB
A/C# is a basic A chord, with a C# played as the bass note as shown below:

E - 0
B - 2
G - 2
D - 2
A - 4
E - x


I think I might understand this. Okay the 222 is the A Major and the C# is the individual note on the A string. Not sure if this note exists but if it were D/F# would the chart look like the following:

E - 2
B - 3
G - 2
D - 4
A - X
E - X

Where you play the D major and then the F# on the D string
-Mike
#5
You can play D/F# like that, but this is more common:

E - 2
B - 3
G - 2
D - 0
A - 0
E - 2
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
Laney VC30
Marshall TSL602
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#6
Quote by GaryHB
You can play D/F# like that, but this is more common:

E - 2
B - 3
G - 2
D - 0
A - 0
E - 2


Hmm, how would one know to play it the way above with the Low E in the bass? Also how would you finger it? Regular way and then use your thumb for the low E?
-Mike
#7
PS - when playing D/F# in the shape I suggested, you'd use your thumb on the bottom E string
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
Laney VC30
Marshall TSL602
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
#8
Guess we posted those last 2 at the same time!
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
Laney VC30
Marshall TSL602
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
#9
Sounds like you've gotten the hang of it: try finding some moveable shapes on all the strings.

Most of these "slash chords" have a note from the chord in the bass note, such as the C# in A major (A - C# - E) and the F# in D major (D - F# - A.) However, occasionally you'll get an unrelated note in the bass, such as G/A:


e|---3---|
B|---3---|
G|---4---|
D|---5---|
A|---0---|
E|-------|


These are nothing to fear: it's still a G chord, it just has a different bass note. You may see this in a context like:

G - G/A - Bm

where the A facilitates the bass movement from G-> B by filling in the gap with an A.
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#10
Thanks everyone for all of the helpful replies. Now I need to start a thread on using the thumb, yikes
-Mike