#1
Am I right in thinking that they are generally meant to be used with computers, pa's excetera and not with amps. Just ive watched many youtube videos with people playing directly into their computers and they sound great whereas every patch I download for my Zoom sounds tinny and harsh through my Bugera, which usually sounds great.
Basically im wondering should I just buy a tubescreamer or something for my tone shaping needs
My Gear:
BC Rich Gunslinger Retro Blade
Vintage V100 Paradise + SD Alnico Pro Slash APH-2's
1963 Burns Short Scale Jazz Guitar
Dean Performer Florentine
Bugera 6260
Orange Micro Terror + cab
Digitech Bad Monkey
Zoom G2G
#2
No - multi-effect pedals are designed to be used with amps. While it is possible to play through a computer, that isn't the intended function.

If yours is sounding tinny through your amp, try adjusting the EQ to have less treble and more bass. This will need to be done on both the amp and the effects unit.
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#4
Mfx pedals are designed to be used with amps, whether theyre tube or ss(modeling amps, not so much). They just give you the option to hook it up to a pa system if you don't have a nice or big enough amp to run it through. When people hook it up to they're computers, theyre usually recording something or editing patches. That's the good thing about mfx units; they're very versatile in the different ways you can hook them up to different things like an amp or a pa system.
Guitars: Fender FSR Standard Strat, Squire Affinity Strat, Epiphone Nighthawk
Amps: Vox AC15C1, Roland Cube 15x, Peavey KB-1
Pedals: Digitech RP355, HD500, Joyo AC-Tone, EHX Soul Food
#5
I don't know what the features for yor Zoom are, but try changing the cab sims if you have them. Also try using distortion stomps instead of amp models.
#7
your probably a lot better off getting real pedals.... no matter how much many you spend on any kind of modeling amp, pedal, software, watever. it is not going to come close to the real thing. take the time to figure out what you want out of your tone and then find an amp that suits it. after that you can add in pedals to modify it or tweak it to make it perfect to your ears
#8
Quote by andrerist
your probably a lot better off getting real pedals.... no matter how much many you spend on any kind of modeling amp, pedal, software, watever. it is not going to come close to the real thing. take the time to figure out what you want out of your tone and then find an amp that suits it. after that you can add in pedals to modify it or tweak it to make it perfect to your ears


Fractal and TC Electronic would like a word.



TS: I don't know about that particular mfx, but if it has amp models or cab models, make sure that they are off. If they're on, it can make your sound suck really fast.
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Ibanez RGA42E
Ibanez S420
LTD H-301
Ibanez RG520
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Line 6 Pod HD500X
#9
While the MFXs can go in the frontend of an amp it's better to go in the power amp or in the return port of the effect loop. That's because the MFXs have a preamp built in so going in the frontend means you're going thru two preamps. This is not bad to do but you'll get more transparency and in the case of amp modeling more to the emulation of said model when you bypass the amp's preamp.

A flat response amp or PA is more suitable for the pedals.
Parker PDF30
Vox VT40+