#1
Hey guys.

Ive got a Behringer PB1000 with 5 pedals attached, running on a 9V battery supply. I just bought a Boss RE-20 and put a random power supply through the pedalboard instead of the BOSS one I use as I couldn't find it, and within 1 minute of setting everything up I heard a popping noise and now my pedalboard/pedals arent working, and when I put the 9V directly into the pedals they arent working.

Have I blown the fuse on all my pedals? (Big Muff, TS9, BD2, Reel Echo, Boss RE-20)

And does anyone know if this is repairable and how?

Any help would be really appreciated.
#2
There's no fuse in the three smaller pedals... Not sure of the last two. What was the rating of the power supply you used?
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#3
The TS9 is working, but the BD2, Big Muff and RE-20 arent. The power supply I used is old and scratched so I've no idea of the voltage. It might have been 18V though.
#6
Yeah well I didnt think, just excited to get the RE-20 going and just grabbed what I thought to be the right pedal.

So what are you all thinking, pedals ****ed?
#8
Is there any way to go about fixing them (if so how much?), or will I have to replace them with new ones?
#9
It will probably cost more to have them repaired than buying new, unless you are handy at fixing printed circut-boards.
something similar happened to my firend with a digitech GNX3 he used the wrong supply and it fried a perfectly godd $400 FX processer.
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#11
You blew all your pedals? Did they at least buy you dinner first?


Seriously though I would check all your cables and stuff first before buying new gear, but you may be screwed. Pedals don't usually have fuses - either they fry or they're fine.
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#12
Quote by barden1069
You blew all your pedals? Did they at least buy you dinner first?



lmao


take out the batts and unplug your pedals and wait a day. then try them with just batteries. it worked for me once. but again it only worked once for me so take that advice wit a grain of salt.
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#13
Quote by hawk5211
palm meet face. That can do SERIOUS damage to 9V pedals.



What? A lot of pedals work better at 18v... Maybe people build 18v voltage doublers for their pedals...

Its doubtful you fried them unless you ran a ton of current or voltage through them. Pop them open and look for burnt parts or more likely circuit tracings. Unless they are really tiny SMDs everything in there is replicable. Even the SMD stuff is but its a little more challenging.

Also make sure your polarity is correct when you test them.
#14
Quote by samhell
What? A lot of pedals work better at 18v... Maybe people build 18v voltage doublers for their pedals...


And alot will fry at 18V, I know from experience. I worked as a sound tech for a few years, and i saw it a few times, even did it myself with a cheap behringer unit.
#15
Quote by samhell
What? A lot of pedals work better at 18v... Maybe people build 18v voltage doublers for their pedals...

Its doubtful you fried them unless you ran a ton of current or voltage through them. Pop them open and look for burnt parts or more likely circuit tracings. Unless they are really tiny SMDs everything in there is replicable. Even the SMD stuff is but its a little more challenging.

Also make sure your polarity is correct when you test them.

Most pedals will fry.

SOME work better.

It depends on the model and make.
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#16
Quote by samhell
What? A lot of pedals work better at 18v... Maybe people build 18v voltage doublers for their pedals...


No. Unless the pedal design and components were over-speced to begin with, they will crash and burn. For a mass-market, cost conscious makers like Boss, they will most likely fry.

TS try the pedals with batteries, or a correct power supply if it doesn't work, you're most likely to need to replace the pedals. Key lesson, always use the right power supply.
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#17
Quote by samhell
What? A lot of pedals work better at 18v... Maybe people build 18v voltage doublers for their pedals...

Its doubtful you fried them unless you ran a ton of current or voltage through them. Pop them open and look for burnt parts or more likely circuit tracings. Unless they are really tiny SMDs everything in there is replicable. Even the SMD stuff is but its a little more challenging.

Also make sure your polarity is correct when you test them.


Most consumer grade 9V devices use caps rated for 16V. Most pedals don't work better at 18V otherwise they would feature an internal voltage doubler (ie Klon) or they would specify an 18V adapter. Some people prefer the sound of certain ODs run at higher voltages but that's about it.

Not to mention he may have used a center positive DC adapter or an AC adapter. In all honesty, you're shit is most likely ****ed and unless you can repair the analog ones yourself, it's probably going to be cheaper to buy new ones unless the warranty allows for you ****ing up the power requirements. The digital pedals are going to have to be replaced. I'm sorry, but there's a reason we recommend at least learning basic electronics if you're going to play an electric instrument.
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#18
Also, if something is burnt out, it's usually components, not traces. The traces are way over spec'd in most pedals.
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#19
Open up the pedal and look for anything that is obviously burnt out, and report back to this thread.
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