#1
I've been playing guitar on and off for 3 years, recently I've decided to devote more time to practising and improving my skills.

I'm into pop/blues/jazz and I would love to be able to come up with melodies on my own.

1) What should I practice? [maybe in order]
2) Do you remember all of the variations of a chord up the neck?


I'd just love to decrease my dependancy on tabs and rely more on fretboard knowledge and my ears [my ears are okay, i'm piano trained ]

Thanks in advance!!
#2
To improve your ear just try to play song, (or start with riffs), just by listening. Or even by watching someone play it. Also, jamming with other people helps. If you're in a band practice improvising more often.
#3
Quote by Eapfep
I've been playing guitar on and off for 3 years, recently I've decided to devote more time to practising and improving my skills.

I'm into pop/blues/jazz and I would love to be able to come up with melodies on my own.

1) What should I practice? [maybe in order]
2) Do you remember all of the variations of a chord up the neck?


I'd just love to decrease my dependancy on tabs and rely more on fretboard knowledge and my ears [my ears are okay, i'm piano trained ]

Thanks in advance!!


Hey Eapfep,

I would suggest starting with learning arpeggio shapes. If you pick a few notes from the arpeggios, you can play chord variations and create your own chords

You can also solo using notes within the arpeggios. The notes will sound great because they are the consonant notes within chords.

As you get familiar with arpeggio shapes, your ability to visualize the fretboard will greatly increase, as will your aural skills. But I would also suggest to sing the arpeggio shapes so they get well burned into your ears!
#4
I always recommend a metronome and arpeggios, so thats what I will recommend now.

Then start with basic theory, specifically rythme. Improv to a certain rythme, and rock out with your cake out of the oven.... Now I want cake...

Then move onto harmony. And spend a lot of time on harmony with rythme.
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#5
Quote by Eapfep
I've been playing guitar on and off for 3 years, recently I've decided to devote more time to practising and improving my skills.

I'm into pop/blues/jazz and I would love to be able to come up with melodies on my own.

1) What should I practice? [maybe in order]
2) Do you remember all of the variations of a chord up the neck?


I'd just love to decrease my dependancy on tabs and rely more on fretboard knowledge and my ears [my ears are okay, i'm piano trained ]

Thanks in advance!!


Eapfep,

Whoa, telling you a few things to practice will do nothing to improve your playing. And no, memorizing all the chord variations will do nothing unless you already know what benefit can be gained from such an endeavor.

Way too many people think getting good at music is about memorizing every note on the fretboard, or practicing X with a metronome at X BPM, or learning all the scales.

If you want to become a great player it's about three things:

(1) listening to music, and understanding how it works. You gotta develop a good ear for melody and be able to tell when something is in key or out of key. Yes- this is about your ears. If you are tone deaf from the start you will never become a great player. Listen for a tonal clash between your playing and the background chords. If you know what playing in key sounds like, your ears will guide you in applying all the scales.

So many non-guitarists, surprisingly, know litte-to-nothing about improv, because they are just used to reading music off a page. When it comes to improv, they don't know how to play in key. This really makes the pretentiousness of classical musicians seem a bit egregious really. Give me a gypsy over some lame-duck "classically trained" musician any day.

(2) Always play in Time. Yes- this is the classic "metronome" comment. You can also use a drum machine, which is actually better as you will learn about music structure and rhythm through having to program it. Playing to an external rhythm-keeping device will force you to regulate the urge to play faster and faster, which typically leads to sloppiness and grotesque playing all round. The external time-keeping device will force you to focus on the quality of the sound eminating from the instrument. Your technique will follow from the production of good sound. Good technique itself is defined by what produces good sound. Just ask Yngwie, he doesn't even know if he uses economy or alternate picking.

(3) Always have a piece of sheet music in front of you. You really gain nothing from just noodling around. Noodling is an instant gratification habit that you should indulge in for maybe 1/2 hour to and hour a session. The other 2 hours should be spent learning a piece of music, a scale, or somthing concrete that you can show. Learning songs will teach you how to play melodies and improv.

Best of luck bro.
Last edited by Riffman15 at Aug 5, 2011,
#6
Quote by Riffman15

Wall o' text.


Better than mine. Follow this one. But with a metronome.

Lately actually, Ive been using my drum machine more, unless Im doing warmups.
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#7
1. Learn A minor/C Major scale all over the neck.
2. Play along with songs in that key until you are very comfortable with the scale.
3. Repeat with new scale
Last edited by alairson22 at Aug 5, 2011,