#1
So I have been thinking about something for a while now. If every living organism in existence were to suddenly die, would life ever "restart"? Like, cause there must have been a point of time when there was no life, and from that we had microorganisms and so on...
#3
Sure. The real question is, "Does it matter?" *Twilight Zone Theme*
#4
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#6
Only if God wanted it to.
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#9
it is possible because planets will be constantly forming
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#13
if the conditions are right, they would.
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#15
"Life will find a way"
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#16
My answer is a definite maybe. Obviously the Earth is a lot different now than it used to be, so maybe it would be easier or not for life to restart.

Either way, I think I should point out that you didn't really specify to well whether you meant life on Earth, or all life (that I assume, as do many others) that is out there.
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#17
Definitely, maybe. Check out Abiogenesis on Wikipedia.


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Last edited by ali.guitarkid7 at Aug 5, 2011,
#19
Quote by fearofthemark
if the conditions are right, they would.


this is correct. Earth is very capable of hosting life right now, but with all life gone, idk how or if they Earth would be capable of creating life again.
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#20
Quote by CrabSoldier X
this is correct. Earth is very capable of hosting life right now, but with all life gone, idk how or if they Earth would be capable of creating life again.


Possibly it wouldn't, conditions on earth when abiogenesis took place about 3 and a half billion years ago were apparently quite different to how they are now, so maybe the earth no longer has the right conditions for abiogenesis to take place
#21
Quote by SlackerBabbath
Possibly it wouldn't, conditions on earth when abiogenesis took place about 3 and a half billion years ago were apparently quite different to how they are now, so maybe the earth no longer has the right conditions for abiogenesis to take place


Well, considering that the conditions were altered in great part by the existence of life itself, it is possible that the Earth would revert back to its primitive state. I suppose the problem with that is that the time required may exceed the implicit time restraints on the whole ordeal, like the time before the sun goes Red Giant.
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#22
Quote by MAC2322
Well, considering that the conditions were altered in great part by the existence of life itself, it is possible that the Earth would revert back to its primitive state. I suppose the problem with that is that the time required may exceed the implicit time restraints on the whole ordeal, like the time before the sun goes Red Giant.

The Earth will never revert back to the state that it was in when the first self-replicating molecule was formed. The atmosphere was very toxic and Earth had much more volcanic (and therefore electrical) activity. It is likely that these were some of the biggest reasons for why self-replicating molecules were able to be formed (heat in particular is a very important factor in many chemical changes).

So if suddenly there was no life on Earth, it is unlikely that living organisms would re-appear in the same way.

We also need to think about what it means to be 'living'. Is a virus living, for example?
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#23
Quote by instagata0
The Earth will never revert back to the state that it was in when the first self-replicating molecule was formed. The atmosphere was very toxic and Earth had much more volcanic (and therefore electrical) activity. It is likely that these were some of the biggest reasons for why self-replicating molecules were able to be formed (heat in particular is a very important factor in many chemical changes).

So if suddenly there was no life on Earth, it is unlikely that living organisms would re-appear in the same way.


Fair enough.

We also need to think about what it means to be 'living'. Is a virus living, for example?


Well, that's a whole other situation entirely, and one I'm not too keen to get into right now.
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#25
ITT: Maybe
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