#1
I have some old Orange drop caps that i need to identify!

They all say : Y5U 103M kck could be I03m

Round flat type!

are these useable for tone pots or do i need different??
Gear:

Guitars
PRS Santana SE
Ibanez MBM2 EMGs
Fender MIM Roadhouse Strat
Ibanez AS93 BLS

Amp
Carvin V3m
Blackheart 4x12 cab

Pedals
Electro-Harmonix Metal Muff
Zakk Wylde Wah
JamMan looper delay

Last edited by TheFUBAR at Aug 5, 2011,
#2
Quote by TheFUBAR
I have some old Orange drop caps that i need to identify!

They all say : Y5U 103M kck could be I03m

are these useable for tone pots or do i need different??



Lookie here: http://www.csgnetwork.com/capcodeinfo.html

You can try whatever cap you want on a tone pot. Maybe you will like it, maybe you won't. You'd have to calculate the cutoff from your cap and pot to determine what its going to sound like on paper... but solder it up, who knows, you might like it. Certainly won't ruin anything.
#3
Sounds like it may be a .001
Which may be a rather small value, but give it a shot.
Make sure you use 50's wiring!
Cusp of Magic
#4
What is a common value for an O drop? Pups are 500 496 gibbys pots are New CTS
Gear:

Guitars
PRS Santana SE
Ibanez MBM2 EMGs
Fender MIM Roadhouse Strat
Ibanez AS93 BLS

Amp
Carvin V3m
Blackheart 4x12 cab

Pedals
Electro-Harmonix Metal Muff
Zakk Wylde Wah
JamMan looper delay

#5
there aren't any round flat orange drops.

it sounds like you have an orange ceramic capacitor.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#6
103 on a cap means 10 with 3 0's in pF, so 10,000pF, which is 10nF or .01uF
Call me "Shot".

ShotRod Guitar Works

Custom Hand-wired Amplifiers and Effect Pedals.

Est. 2007


Source to everything I say about Guitars, Pedals, and Amplifiers: I make them.


UG's Best DIY PedalBoard
#8
Quote by TheFUBAR
What is a common value for an O drop? Pups are 500 496 gibbys pots are New CTS


i think you are specifically asking what are normal values for tone capacitors in a guitar. 0.022 is the standard value for humbucker guitars and 0.047 is the standard value for single coil guitars.
#10
look at a guide ethan

the math is right there, it operates on a basis of thousands


103pf on a cap mean 10 + (3 zero's) so that = 10,000pf. 10,000 pf is the same as 10nf. 10 nf is = .01uf

.001 uf = 1nf = 1,000 pf.


engineers use the system so they can give more accurate measures at lower resistances. hence the uf, nf, and pf.
#11
Quote by 00_hns_00
look at a guide ethan

the math is right there, it operates on a basis of thousands


103pf on a cap mean 10 + (3 zero's) so that = 10,000pf. 10,000 pf is the same as 10nf. 10 nf is = .01uf

.001 uf = 1nf = 1,000 pf.


engineers use the system so they can give more accurate measures at lower resistances. hence the uf, nf, and pf.


I failed college math....

I prefer to understand what the electricity is actually doing, and how components affect it, it helps me to understand the math behind it. So, if you throw a bunch of numbers at me, my mind stops working, the little hamster in my head falls over out of his running wheel and dies a little.
#12
Quote by brentonlatour
i think you are specifically asking what are normal values for tone capacitors in a guitar. 0.022 is the standard value for humbucker guitars and 0.047 is the standard value for single coil guitars.


Thanks that is what i was lookin for!!!!!
Gear:

Guitars
PRS Santana SE
Ibanez MBM2 EMGs
Fender MIM Roadhouse Strat
Ibanez AS93 BLS

Amp
Carvin V3m
Blackheart 4x12 cab

Pedals
Electro-Harmonix Metal Muff
Zakk Wylde Wah
JamMan looper delay

#13
Quote by ethan_hanus
I failed college math....

I prefer to understand what the electricity is actually doing, and how components affect it, it helps me to understand the math behind it. So, if you throw a bunch of numbers at me, my mind stops working, the little hamster in my head falls over out of his running wheel and dies a little.

lol, but you do understand that those numbers are based by 1,000's right?
open up your calculator on the computer and do .001 x 1000. then do it again.


the higher the resistance, say .047uf, bleeds off more of the high range frequencies. the lower the resistance, the more treble bleeds through.


stratocasters typically have .047uf caps for the tone circuit, because single coil pickups with no tone cap are very trebly and very glassy almost. a .047uf cap helps tame that.
humbucking guitars typically have .022uf caps for the tone circuit, because humbuckers generally are much more dark, and have more bass and mid frequencies than single coils, so to help keep some of the high end, they use .022uf caps.


.047 is like a 6'9 bouncer that won't let anyone but the really hot chicks come into the club.
.022 is like a 6'1 bouncer that has alittle bit looser standards on the hot chicks. not much, but still looser.
#14
Quote by brentonlatour
i think you are specifically asking what are normal values for tone capacitors in a guitar. 0.022 is the standard value for humbucker guitars and 0.047 is the standard value for single coil guitars.

you've got that backwards.

Quote by 00_hns_00
l
the higher the resistance, say .047uf, bleeds off more of the high range frequencies. the lower the resistance, the more treble bleeds through.

stratocasters typically have .047uf caps for the tone circuit, because single coil pickups with no tone cap are very trebly and very glassy almost. a .047uf cap helps tame that.
humbucking guitars typically have .022uf caps for the tone circuit, because humbuckers generally are much more dark, and have more bass and mid frequencies than single coils, so to help keep some of the high end, they use .022uf caps.

capacitance =/= resistance. treble doesnt 'bleed' through. singles use 22nF and humbuckers use 47nF because their respective inductances are more compatible with those values. but you can use whatever values you see fit. it really doesn't matter.

a capacitor has a certain reactance depending on it's capacitance value and the frequency of AC applied to it. if you want to get technical for a second then the formula is this:
Xc=1 / 2πfC

where
Xc= Capacitive reactance in Ohms
f= frequency of applied signal in Hertz
C= capacitance value in Farads

So put simply, treble freqs have a lower reactance to a certain capacitance than do bass freqs. and a certain value of capacitance passes all freqs above a certain point. The purpose of the pot is to keep those highs by giving them a much higher resistance to have to go through (the pot value plus the Xc of the tone cap). since the whole tone circuit is paralell to the main signal path, those highs that make it through the cap are shunted to ground, which is usually thought of as 'oblivion'. and because of this, using mojo caps in a guitar is useless. whatever tone mojo they offer is not heard because they are not even in the signal path. whatever DOES go through them is shunted out of the signal.

and leaving off the tone control entirely wont affect the sound that much.
Last edited by Invader Jim at Aug 9, 2011,