#1
I realize there are probably hundreds of basic/introductory steps I should tackle first, but if someone could break down this measure for me I'd really appreciate it.

http://i52.tinypic.com/jgrznd.png

Basically, what I'm wondering is all related to that chord I've boxed off. I've been told it's a C major chord (do not hesitate to correct me if this is wrong!). This makes some sense to me, but the two notes below middle C - what are they and how do you know? If it is truly C major, then the notes would have to be E and G, right?

I'm aware of ledger lines, but I'm not sure how notation above/below each staff works. My question also applies to that note dangling below the bass staff.

I appreciate any help/pushes in the right direction -- I've only recently started to explore music in written form.
Last edited by big muff pedal at Aug 5, 2011,
#2
The bass notes are just two Cs an octave apart. Below and above the staff, the pattern just continues as normal. Every line and space is the next sequential letter. Recognizing these is harder than seeing the notes on the staves themselves, but you'll get it with enough repetition.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#3
Unless I'm mistaken, it's a C major chord in it's first inversion. It's (lowest to highest note) E G C.

As far as ledger lines go, they continue in the same pattern. The lowest line on the treble clef is E. The space below it is D. The first ledger line below it is C. The space below it is B, the line below that (second line below) is A, etc. Let me know if I need to clarify any of that.
#4
Quote by stickfigurekill
Unless I'm mistaken, it's a C major chord in it's first inversion. It's (lowest to highest note) E G C.


Remember to look at it as a whole. The bass is playing two Cs below the right-hand voicing, meaning that it is a simple root position C.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#5
Quote by soviet_ska
Remember to look at it as a whole. The bass is playing two Cs below the right-hand voicing, meaning that it is a simple root position C.


Man, I missed that! I'll look out for that next time.
#6
you'll also be better at intervals the more you practice, like if you see that C and a fourth and sixth below it, you'll just know what the other notes are, just practice! and see the lowest note in the bass stave? a good way to find out what note it is is to look if it's played in octaves, like many basslines are. so learn to recognise the interval of an octave, and then just add the same note below the one in the ledger lines.
#7
Big Muff go to this web site:

http://www.mybandmusic.com

go to the keyboard and mallet page and look for the "piano_staff_note_position" file and the "keyboard_chrom_layout" file.

If you have more questions go to the home page and use contact box to get in touch with me.
#8
The bottom two notes in the red box of your example are actualy in the bass clef, but with the use of ledger lines it looks like its in the treble clef. You will use your right hand to play these notes.
#10
Quote by d1sturbed4eva
Look at the key signature, it's actually a C minor chord.


Look at the E natural, it's a C major chord.
#11
I'm not an expert at sight reading, but I can tell you that the biggest help to me in reading things quicker has been the recognition of intervals. Learn the pattern of how many lines and spaces you skip for each interval. A line to a line or a space to a space is a third, two lines is a fifth, etc. etc. This will help you to figure notes out on ledger lines and in other circumstances without having to stop and count the notes up the alphabet. You'll also want to memorize some key ledger line positions. For example, the first ledger line below the treble clef is middle C, and two lines below is an A. A line above the treble clef is an A, and two lines is a C. A-C, C-A is a pretty useful pattern to have in your pocket. Also remember that middle C splits up the treble and bass clefs, so one line above the bass clef is middle C, just as the line below the treble clef is middle C.
#13
Quote by griffRG7321
Look at the E natural, it's a C major chord.



griff has it correct - the bottom note in the treble clef is an E not e flat.
#15
it is difficult to learn sight reading compared to just playing piano chords. it takes a lot of practice and eye-hand coordination exercise.
Last edited by sarai abrams at Aug 25, 2011,
#16
Quote by nmitchell076
What I'm confused about is why the hell is that pickup measure in 6/4. That seems like an utterly useless addition

Maybe it's an accompaniment to something else?

Only thing I can think of...