#1
Just a fun thread, maybe spark some ideas for others.
I'm not sure if this was a thread before, so if it is, post a link to it, please.

So, not everybody can dish out money for a proper sound booth. Some people use blankets, some use their closet, Lil' Jon used a mattress in a shower!

What's YOUR cheap man's sound booth?
(By cheap, I mean no money to buy quality equipment.)
Where is it? How big is it? What do you have in it? What are you recording in it? Did you make it? With what? How?

Post pictures!

I'm sure this would be fun and informative to others who need a better "cheap man's" sound booth!
-[D.M.]tragedy™
Caught Alive! Designs
Seize the Sun | Guitarist
Management: Joe Gingerella | Black Ice Ent.
Man. E-mail: showmedia@hotmail.com
Man. Phone: (253) 678-3593
#4
my apartment has a hall its the only room in the house that you can close all the doors too and not hear the birds outside its bassically the middle of the apartment
#5

EDIT: there is a common misconception that by using baffling/sound dispersion foam etc you should be completely deadening the space. Dead space sounds shit. Dont do that.
Last edited by guy_tebache at Aug 6, 2011,
#6
Quote by hightension01
depends on what kind of capture you want.. most good studios dont even really use ISO booths for vocal capture. they normally make sound traps

this is what our engineer has set-up for screams http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=134862203249459&set=a.134861696582843.27585.134857126583300&type=1&theater


The guy that recorded my band did a similar thing in his small bedroom to record screams.

How big is that room? Is there worry about the natural reverbs in the room?
-[D.M.]tragedy™
Caught Alive! Designs
Seize the Sun | Guitarist
Management: Joe Gingerella | Black Ice Ent.
Man. E-mail: showmedia@hotmail.com
Man. Phone: (253) 678-3593
#7
Quote by guy_tebache

EDIT: there is a common misconception that by using baffling/sound dispersion foam etc you should be completely deadening the space. Dead space sounds shit. Dont do that.


That's a pretty clever set-up. What do you normally record with that? How does it sound? Pros & cons?

And your comment on the foam, when I was doing research on making a studio and using the foam, I often came across the same comment saying only cover about half of the walls, not make walls out of foam. Is that what you're talking about?
-[D.M.]tragedy™
Caught Alive! Designs
Seize the Sun | Guitarist
Management: Joe Gingerella | Black Ice Ent.
Man. E-mail: showmedia@hotmail.com
Man. Phone: (253) 678-3593
#8
Quote by rockstar2be
The box our fridge came in, filled with egg boxes


Now that's CHEAP! Haha, straight up cardboard pretty much. Does it work pretty good?
-[D.M.]tragedy™
Caught Alive! Designs
Seize the Sun | Guitarist
Management: Joe Gingerella | Black Ice Ent.
Man. E-mail: showmedia@hotmail.com
Man. Phone: (253) 678-3593
#9
....this may be a huge step up for my home recording quality. :O

If I'm recording a metal style distortion from a guitar amp, I'm guessing having a sound booth for my condenser microphone would improve the quality? If so, by how much?

Better yet, if anyone could briefly explain the general use of a sound booth, I may love for that.
#10
Quote by Shayden2008
....this may be a huge step up for my home recording quality. :O

If I'm recording a metal style distortion from a guitar amp, I'm guessing having a sound booth for my condenser microphone would improve the quality? If so, by how much?

Better yet, if anyone could briefly explain the general use of a sound booth, I may love for that.


Well, to start, a lot of research via Google will help you more, since there's a lot of info.

A soundbooth pretty much helps you control the sound you're recording. Since walls will reflect sound, you try to not get that most of the time. Try going to you're bedroom and clap a few times, then go on your bed, cover yourself from head to just past your arms with your blanket, and clap.

As goes your amp, generally putting the mic up close would do just fine and the booth wouldn't affect it as much, but there's a lot of variables to consider.

If your recordings are sounding "spacey", even when the mic is up close to the speaker, try making a "backboard" for your mic and see if that helps. Or maybe covering the amp and mic with your blanket?

From my experience, unless your amp is in a big, empty-ish room (ie. Garage), you should be fine.

I don't know what mic you're using now and how satisfied you are, but, in my opinion, a condenser is no better then a dynamic mic when it comes to recording a live amp. It's just a matter of what sound you want, another piece to your guitar rig's tone.

Oh, and the post above from guy_tebache, I imagine putting that up against a speaker and having an iso-cab sound out of it.

I hope that helps a bit.
-[D.M.]tragedy™
Caught Alive! Designs
Seize the Sun | Guitarist
Management: Joe Gingerella | Black Ice Ent.
Man. E-mail: showmedia@hotmail.com
Man. Phone: (253) 678-3593
Last edited by damonkey999 at Aug 6, 2011,
#11
To be honest I have a room in my apartment that is perfect for what I want. Just a very tiny amount of reverb so the vocals don't sound fake when adding reverb in post processing. The walls are thick so there is not any bleed from outside of room. There is a wall that runs a quarter the way across the with of the room. The computer is on the other side of that so even he hot temperature there is no fan noise. I love the room. Easily the best I have recorded in. I am gonna miss it when I move out next year.

I don't get me started on mixing. The small room wall which is length of desk makes the rokit5s sound great. When I record in other places I wait to get back before mixing.
#12
my closet. then i just mic the cab with an sm57 and bam. any other effects are added in the DAW.
#13
I prefer vocals in a larger room. A cheap remedy I did once that worked surprisingly well was in a fairly large room, I stood two couches on their end and used those to try to block off reflections from parallel walls. For acoustic guitars I used both couches, one for each parallel wall, and for vocals I just put the mic right up inside the V of the tallest stood up couch. It wasn't by any means perfect, but for not spending any money and for being in a different room than normal, it worked surprisingly well.
#14
Standing couches on end in the corners of rooms should function decently as bass traps.

I've sketched up some designs for standing folding screen panels. It's a rip-off of GIK Acoustics screen panels for the most part, except they are 6.5 feet tall (I need the height) and 2" thick unfolded instead of 6 feet tall and 3.5" thick unfolded.

Fold them up and corner them for bass traps, or set them behind you when monitoring, or in front of your and behind you for recording vocals -- THE POSSIBILITIES!
Ibanez AS93
Fender Marauder
Vox Pathfinder 15R
#15
Quote by sandyman323
I prefer vocals in a larger room. A cheap remedy I did once that worked surprisingly well was in a fairly large room, I stood two couches on their end and used those to try to block off reflections from parallel walls. For acoustic guitars I used both couches, one for each parallel wall, and for vocals I just put the mic right up inside the V of the tallest stood up couch. It wasn't by any means perfect, but for not spending any money and for being in a different room than normal, it worked surprisingly well.


Standing up couches? That's a good idea to not spend a single cent! Haha
I'd try that out myself but the couches I have would fall over since the arm rests sticks out a bit.
Next time, I should just try using the seat cushions and prop-ing them up.
-[D.M.]tragedy™
Caught Alive! Designs
Seize the Sun | Guitarist
Management: Joe Gingerella | Black Ice Ent.
Man. E-mail: showmedia@hotmail.com
Man. Phone: (253) 678-3593
#16
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h5gq_su_1GU&feature=relmfu

2:00

I've used this setup before, it's works pretty well for a budget home recording . Pretty inspiring if you ask me.
#17
Grrr, there's that mic I want but cannot afford.
Ibanez AS93
Fender Marauder
Vox Pathfinder 15R
#19
Quote by Afroboy267
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h5gq_su_1GU&feature=relmfu

2:00

I've used this setup before, it's works pretty well for a budget home recording . Pretty inspiring if you ask me.


That's pretty much what I did when I recorded my band's clean vocals, but it was in a corner of my garage, since we had to do it late night and parents were going to bed.
I pretty much made a small booth out of blankets and towels. Used a clothes hanging rack thing to hang a blanket and made the wall behind my bandmate. The booth only had 3 "walls", haha.
-[D.M.]tragedy™
Caught Alive! Designs
Seize the Sun | Guitarist
Management: Joe Gingerella | Black Ice Ent.
Man. E-mail: showmedia@hotmail.com
Man. Phone: (253) 678-3593
#20
Quote by DisarmGoliath
Tracking guitars for new album...



What kind of mic are you using?

Btw, off topic, but I noticed your gear list had the ISP Decimator in it. If you don't mind me asking, is it the rack mount or pedel, and how well is it working for you?
-[D.M.]tragedy™
Caught Alive! Designs
Seize the Sun | Guitarist
Management: Joe Gingerella | Black Ice Ent.
Man. E-mail: showmedia@hotmail.com
Man. Phone: (253) 678-3593
#21
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#22
Quote by damonkey999

And your comment on the foam, when I was doing research on making a studio and using the foam, I often came across the same comment saying only cover about half of the walls, not make walls out of foam. Is that what you're talking about?


As a very general rule, you want a combination of absorptive and reflective surfaces. As another very general rule, those surfaces should be opposite each other.

A room that is too reflective or too absorptive - neither is good.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#23
-[D.M.]tragedy™
Caught Alive! Designs
Seize the Sun | Guitarist
Management: Joe Gingerella | Black Ice Ent.
Man. E-mail: showmedia@hotmail.com
Man. Phone: (253) 678-3593
#24
Foam bed pad from college single bed tacked to wall behind mic. Works fine for my condenser on both clean and growl vox. Can't wait to get my sm7b tho so everyone can do vox wherever they damn well please.
#25
Quote by Odirunn
Foam bed pad from college single bed tacked to wall behind mic. Works fine for my condenser on both clean and growl vox. Can't wait to get my sm7b tho so everyone can do vox wherever they damn well please.
Hmmm. Thinkin' of sellin' me left nut to get one o' them.
Ibanez AS93
Fender Marauder
Vox Pathfinder 15R
#26
Quote by damonkey999
What kind of mic are you using?



(Sennheiser e906 and a Shure SM57)


Btw, off topic, but I noticed your gear list had the ISP Decimator in it. If you don't mind me asking, is it the rack mount or pedel, and how well is it working for you?

I have the pedal version (had it about 3 years now), I would have the rack version if I had lots of spare money but the pedal works well enough for anyone that isn't a signed, touring artist Main advantage to the pedal over the rack though is that you can turn the pedal on and off at will, which isn't important if you have an experienced guitar tech/enough time in soundcheck to set the rackmount one perfectly (I presume, as I haven't used one), which means for the stuff I play live I can have it set to not feedback at all without cutting any notes, and then switch it off when holding long whammy dives/want feedback for effect.

The best thing about the ProRack G is the two channels that allow you to run one gate in the front (for feedback-reduction) and one in the effects loop (to get rid of hissy preamp noise), whereas on the standard Decimator pedal you can only run it either in front or in effects loop - there is a pedal version of the two-channel rackmount called the Decimator G String, which I imagine works about the same, so would benefit me more I imagine, but I get by live with the preamp noise as it's not that noticeable at a metal gig!

Anyway, in short it is great and definitely the best noise gate for guitar on the market in my opinion. It's actually the most important pedal in my rig, other than my amp's MIDIboard - I don't use OD pedals (building a modded Tubescreamer clone for studio use) as the amp's overdrive/distortion sounds are phenomenal anyway, and I rarely bother with effects live.
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
Last edited by DisarmGoliath at Aug 7, 2011,