#1
Hello everyone I was wondering if there is some sort of pattern or formula that could help me to target or to identify the root the 3rd and 5th while soloing in some of the 7 patterns of the minor scale or 7 modes?
#2
Yes,

Do you know your notes on the neck to where you can name them instantly, or find them if needed to in a second or less?

Do you know your triads, for example if I asked you to name the notes of a Bb Minor triad, could you do it in a second or less?

If so then you have the skill sets needed to accomplish this in real time.

Best,

Sean
#3
learn the notes on the fretboard. Practice playing slow solos even if your technique allows you to go fast. This way, you have time to think. After enough practice, you won't have to think about the notes. It will happen spontaneously even at faster speeds.
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#4
Yeah i know most of the notes on the fretboard, I know how to recognize triads but not instantly, it takes me some time, actually I have to revise the scale and then I will recognize the notes of triads. The notes are of Bb triad A# C# F it took me like 30 seconds. I guess I just need to spend some time revising scales.
#5
Quote by Tomas_slash
The notes are of Bb triad A# C# F


D'oh! Remember, it's Bb minor... .

Just keep deriving your scales and chords in all keys: it's a memorization game once you understand how it's done. I recommend memorizing the 1st, 4th and 5th of every scale first. Then, implement the 3rd and 7th. Finally, the 2nd and 6th. You might find it easier to do it in little chunks like that.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#6
Quote by Tomas_slash
Hello everyone I was wondering if there is some sort of pattern or formula that could help me to target or to identify the root the 3rd and 5th while soloing in some of the 7 patterns of the minor scale or 7 modes?


well there is. the way to do it is to identify the 3rd and 5th interval off of the chords root. Truthfully though, you are better off just using your ears and hearing what sound good against the chord. If it sounds REALLY good it usually is a chord tone or simply a pleasing interval against whatever chord you are on.

So to answer your question you just need to look up about intervals on youtube or something. It is kinda hard to explain here unless you can see it on the fretboard but the concept of intervals is extremely easy to get down.
#7
what peolpe forget to do is play melodically. don't picture 3rd root 5th, picture the note your on and where the nearest note in the next chord is and how to get there, in triadic harmony, literally every note is at most one note away from where you are. think of connecting them like this instead of an exercise of spot the arpeggio.
#9
Quote by liampje
If you're to lazy to learn the fretboard, learn the triads.

And how exactly does he play the triads if he doesn't know the notes on the fretboard?
I'm not a James Hetfield fan
My username is "hames jetfield" because "farty mriedman" sounds weird.

Quote by laid-to-waste
i have rabies from licking my pet rat's face


Jackson DK2M
Digitech RP255
Vox DA5
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#10
Quote by hames jetfield
And how exactly does he play the triads if he doesn't know the notes on the fretboard?


I'm guessing he meant the chord positions for all the triads...but you can find them all on your own (and on the fly) if you learn the fretboard.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#11
Quote by Tomas_slash
Hello everyone I was wondering if there is some sort of pattern or formula that could help me to target or to identify the root the 3rd and 5th while soloing in some of the 7 patterns of the minor scale or 7 modes?


I wouldn't do that. I assume you just read in a thread somewhere that you should "target" 3rds and 7ths.... or something along those lines. Sadly, just playing through patterns (whether you can name the notes or not) while not listening or having musical experience and randomly "targeting" notes that you heard were the "correct notes to hit", simply isn't going to work if your goal is to play music.

You want to learn to target tones by hearing them. and you want to learn to hear them in context.


something you can do to train your ear to hear "target tones".......


Practice playing arps through chord progressions

This is often marketed as target tone practice. Just remember it's a mechanical exercise. You don't want to play that way.... you want to play musically.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 8, 2011,
#12
Quote by GuitarMunky
I wouldn't do that. I assume you just read in a thread somewhere that you should "target" 3rds and 7ths.... or something along those lines. Sadly, just playing through patterns (whether you can name the notes or not) while not listening or having musical experience and randomly "targeting" notes that you heard were the "correct notes to hit", simply isn't going to work if your goal is to play music.

You want to learn to target tones by hearing them. and you want to learn to hear them in context.


something you can do to train your ear to hear "target tones".......


Practice playing arps through chord progressions

This is often marketed as target tone practice. Just remember it's a mechanical exercise. You don't want to play that way.... you want to play musically.


Playing arps through chord progressions is an exercise if you want it to be....it can also be musical as can targeting roots and 3rds and 5ths and any other chord tone. The key (as you stated) is hearing these tones over the chords. The only way to hear them is to practice listening to each chord tone against the chord. Then targeting these notes can be as musical as any other approach if you are really listening. Same with arps, if you use them to make melodies they wont sound like an exercise. This way you are gaining musicality, improving your ear, improving your fretboard knowledge and working on the technical aspect of playing any and all of these ideas.
Andy
#13
Quote by Andy_Mclaughlan
Playing arps through chord progressions is an exercise if you want it to be....it can also be musical as can targeting roots and 3rds and 5ths and any other chord tone.


Generally no. A solo and/or melody that consists of all 3rd and 5ths, or all arps for that matter is rare to non-existant. Playing arps through chord progressions as an exercise is beneficial because it teaches you to hear and visualize where the chord tones of a particular key (or set of keys) are on your instrument. You still have to connect that to melodic practice though, and that comes from experiencing music in context..... by studying, playing and creating it.


Quote by Andy_Mclaughlan

Same with arps, if you use them to make melodies they wont sound like an exercise.

if you play a melody it's a melody..... and that tends to imply the use of chord tones as well as non-chord tones.


Quote by Andy_Mclaughlan

This way you are gaining musicality, improving your ear, improving your fretboard knowledge and working on the technical aspect of playing any and all of these ideas.
Andy

if you're not playing musically, your not gaining musicality. mechanical exercises can be beneficial, but it's important to see them for what they are. You wouldn't for instance want to be improvising and actually have to think "Now I am targeting the 7th, Now I am targeting the 3rd". For an exercise that's okay, but for playing you need a more intuitive approach.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 8, 2011,
#14
Quote by Tomas_slash
Hello everyone I was wondering if there is some sort of pattern or formula that could help me to target or to identify the root the 3rd and 5th while soloing in some of the 7 patterns of the minor scale or 7 modes?


Hi Tomas,

First, take a chord progression, here's an easy one in the key of C:

|C / / / | F / / / | Am / / / | G / / / |

If you can record yourself playing the chords, then great, you have your own backing track. If not, don't worry - you can still do this without a backing track.

Next, follow these steps:

1) Play the root of each chord, one note per bar. (So for bar 1 play C; for bar 2 play F, for bar 3 play A etc...)

2) Play the third of each chord, one note per bar. (So for bar 1 play E; for bar 2 play A; for bar 3 play C etc...)

3) Play the fifth of each chord, one note per bar. (So far bar 1 play G; for bar 2 play C; for bar 3 play E etc...)

This might be tricky at first, but soon you'll become smoother with it.

You can do this for any interval you like. A lot of guys like the sound of the 9 interval when soloing, so you could just play through the sequence playing only the 9th of each chord.

Combine the above system with arpeggio exercise* that's been mentioned and you're off to a good start.

Good luck!

Steve

*With the arpeggio exercise, you play the arpeggio of each chord. So in bar 1 play a C arpeggio, for bar 2 play an F arpeggio, for bar 3 play an A minor arpeggio etc...
#15
Hey Thank you Steve for that good explanation, I find it helpful and easy I think I should try that out.