#1
What's the difference? I know the Jazz bass has a thinner neck and the P-Bass sounds more "punchier".
#2
Feel, tone, blah blah blah. To find out which you like better you're just going to have to play them, nothing anyone on here says is really going to help you that much in deciding in the long run. This thread pops up every month or so, and this really could've gone in your other thread.
Basses:
Fender Precision Bass
Fender Jazz Bass
1967 Fender Coronado Bass II
Warwick Star Bass
Squier Precision Bass TB
#3
I myself seem to go towards the Jazz bass. I just like the thin beck better and to be they look much better then the P bass does.
#4
The Precision bass has more of a "Thump" the warm punchy low mid sound. Its body shape is more traditional and neck is chunkier.

A Jazz bass has more of a "Growl", Its sound is more of a high-mid treble sound. It has an offset waist and a slimmer neck.

If you want a deeper warm sound, go for the P, if you want more growl and brightness in your tone, go for the jazz.

But, I can get a deep warm thumpy sound on my jazz as well, and the P can get fairly growly and bright.

I prefer the Jazz, because of its tone and how it plays. You can also get a (decent) P sound of using the front pickup in the jazz, and by using different volumes with each pickup, you can get a variety of tones. If you really like playing the bass, you're probably going to pick up both at some point. I have both and use both, its just preference.

Go to the store and play each of them, and buy which you like the best. Both the Jazz and Precision can work for any genre of music, so buy what sounds best to your ears.


Quote by consecutive e
This thread pops up every month or so, and this really could've gone in your other thread.



I have what I said above in a note on my desktop, I just copy paste into every one of these threads.
#5
Quote by Pandawithapick
I have what I said above in a note on my desktop, I just copy paste into every one of these threads.

Basses:
Fender Precision Bass
Fender Jazz Bass
1967 Fender Coronado Bass II
Warwick Star Bass
Squier Precision Bass TB
#6
This question is ages old but I still feel like I should put in a comment here, call it my annual one since I so rarely post. And since it was covered very well by Pandawithapick. But still.

Jazz basses do tend to have a bit more of a certain growl to them as phrased above, alot of which is due to the bass being designed to project more high mid frequencies. Neck pick up alone gives a precision-esque sound, it won't sound exactly like a P bass due to construction differences between the pickup. However I find that I prefer the sound of a soloed neck jazz rather than a P pickup, also because you can blend in the bridge pickup to change out a variety of tones.

The bridge pickup, along with a "slimmer" neck, is definitely the defining factor of the J bass. It has very prominent mids, and with proper eq-ing can still sound very full and defined, providing it is a decent bass with a decent amp.

The most important thing that i find though is that with both pickups set at full volume, you get a lovely mid scoop that just sits so nicely in a mix. I know that we always say that "Mids are important" and "Make sure you have enough mids", but there is such a thing as too many mids. Scooped out mids does not make it a metal bass sound, it doesn't mean you won't cut through. That is more dependent on your amp and speakers. I learned this lesson very quickly after buying an SWR 4x12 cab.

P basses have a very prominent low mid punch, a fat bottom end, and in a well made one, a nice well defined top end. It is still plenty versatile in tone and bands. The reason why you find it in so many bands and in so many genres, is because it is an easy bass to dial in a good tone with, it responds well to the way you play it, but most good basses will. It is very good at cutting through heavily distorted guitars. And it just looks so sexy.

You can also get a P bass with a jazz pickup in the bridge. This is called a P/J configuration and offers a wider range of tones. But you can also get a Jazz bass with a precision pickup in the neck, still P/J.

The neck profiles are different, but I find that to be most noticeable in vintage P basses. Most standard production P basses may have a slightly chunkier neck, but it's hardly noticeable to me in comparison to my friend's '78 P bass, that thing is a baseball bat. Many P basses are made with "slim taper" or "jazz bass" or your "modern C shape" necks. To say that all precision style basses have big fat necks is lumping them all together.

But it all depends on the model you go for, the maker, what you play it through, how you play it, things like that. Both are such solid and standard models that either one will sound great providing you do it justice. I just prefer jazzes myself.

If you are buying then good luck to you!
Gear:1991 Fender MIJ Jazz/Squier VM Fretless Jazz -> Pitchblack -> Way Huge Green Rhino -> Boss OC-2 -> Boss DD-7 -> Markbass Tube 800 -> SWR 4x12.

Flat wounds. Flat wounds on everything. Everything is a little fatter when it's flatter.