#1
Hi there, I need some theory buffs to help me understand something. I would say that I am a talented guitarist but am stuck at a dead end in terms of theory. I have learnt a lot of scales that are good to go up and down with but I struggle when putting them together.

My brother taught me that the E Minor Scale fits with the G Major Scale. He then went on to start going on about an A Scale that also fits in with the other 2. I was wondering what scales fit with other scales that move down the neck. I am not fussed about finding the keys but if you could explain what other scales go with the E minor scale that would help a great deal.

thanks for all your help in advance

DCBOY

#2
Well your brother is right, G major and E minor fits together. Why? They got the same notes in them, they are just using different notes as root notes (G and E).

There are seven notes in the scale, that means you got 7 different starting points.

Starting from G you would have the G Ionian (Also known as a basic major scale), starting from A you would have dorian, starting from B you would have Phrygian, starting from C Lydian, D Mixolydian, E Aeolian (Minor) and F# Locrian.

All these got the same notes in them, just starting from different points.
#3
thankyou very much mate! great help. I will get those scales learnt as soon as possible. I want to be able to solo more fluently and without thinking too much.
#4
Quote by Sickz
Well your brother is right, G major and E minor fits together. Why? They got the same notes in them, they are just using different notes as root notes (G and E).

There are seven notes in the scale, that means you got 7 different starting points.

Starting from G you would have the G Ionian (Also known as a basic major scale), starting from A you would have dorian, starting from B you would have Phrygian, starting from C Lydian, D Mixolydian, E Aeolian (Minor) and F# Locrian.

All these got the same notes in them, just starting from different points.

Modes (Ionian, Dorian etc.) are something you definitely don't want to start learning now. They're advanced concepts and you have much more useful fundamentals to learn like chord construction. I recommend checking out this series of articles: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/the_guide_to/the_ultimate_guide_to_guitar_chapter_i__1_introduction_-_the_guitar.html
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
#5
I have started learning chord construction a while ago and am not too bad at that. what is the benefit of learning chord construction?
#6
chord construction is so that you know which notes from the scale are in the chord,
i first learned all scales and notes, to then start understanding why chords are how they are :p
#7
I understand why chords are the way they are to an extent... I suppose I will have to learn it in more detail
#8
Quote by Flibo
Modes (Ionian, Dorian etc.) are something you definitely don't want to start learning now. They're advanced concepts and you have much more useful fundamentals to learn like chord construction. I recommend checking out this series of articles: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/the_guide_to/the_ultimate_guide_to_guitar_chapter_i__1_introduction_-_the_guitar.html


I dident mean him to learn the modes in such a way, i ment for him to learn them as a reference point. I agree to 110% that modes is something he should not start study at the moment, mostly since modal music aint used that much anymore. Just for reference.

You should aswell learn chord construction (as said) the benefit with this is that you will be able to learn to solo using chord notes AND be able to play the chord in every possible key, not thinking about "shapes" as that may limit you.

One thing i would advice you to do aswell is taking basic chords and learn to invert them. What that means is that you may take a C major chord and instead of having C as the lowest note you might have the E as the lowest note.

Check this site out, start from the beginning. It helped me alot with theory.
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons
#9
Quote by dc-boy
Hi there, I need some theory buffs to help me understand something. I would say that I am a talented guitarist but am stuck at a dead end in terms of theory. I have learnt a lot of scales that are good to go up and down with but I struggle when putting them together.

My brother taught me that the E Minor Scale fits with the G Major Scale. He then went on to start going on about an A Scale that also fits in with the other 2. I was wondering what scales fit with other scales that move down the neck. I am not fussed about finding the keys but if you could explain what other scales go with the E minor scale that would help a great deal.

thanks for all your help in advance

DCBOY


to be honest your brother's started you off on completely the wrong foot. He's chucking random bits of information that aren't exactly incorrect, but aren't particularly relevant or useful.

Don't worry about "scales that fit together" or anything like that because that's not particulary important.

It's important to start with the basics....a scale is NOT a pattern or shape on the fretboard.

A scale is a series of notes, chosen because the intervals between them sound good together....

...now if anything in that sentence didn't make sense you need to stop doing anything else scale related and go right back to the beginning.

First thing you need to know is where the notes are on your fretboard, because without that you aren't going to know where scales start, let alone know what all the notes are. Every scale exists all over the fretboard, they're not just isolated patterns or snippets, so if you're presented with patterns along the fretboard as several different scales linked together then it's probably the wrong information.

There is a lot to take in but it'll make more sense and go in a lot quicker if you take your time, start at the beginning and follow things through in order.

The stuff you need to get under your belt is:

Notes on the fretboard
Intervals
Constructing the major scale
Harmonising the major scale to derive chords.

Each of those is a pretty big subject in itself, have a read through of Josh Urban's Crusade articles in the columns section as they'll give you a coherent structure to follow.
Actually called Mark!

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#10
Thanks everyone. I think I made it sound like I am an absolute beginner but I have been playing guitar for just over 4 years. I understand where all the notes are on the fret board etc. I just want to be able to know more theory. I dont want to play a chord progression and have to wait minutes before I know what key it is in and then put scales to it. I want more fluidity to my play if you get me
#11
Hi guys, I loosely know the notes of the fretboard (if i stop and think about it), does anybody know any good exercises to help memorise them? Also, what is meant by all these; Intervals, Constructing the major scale, Harmonising the major scale to derive chords? Thanks in advance Please email at JRGuitar@hotmail.co.uk if anybody knows a good way to start learning theory e.g websites or other resources?
#12
Quote by dc-boy
Thanks everyone. I think I made it sound like I am an absolute beginner but I have been playing guitar for just over 4 years. I understand where all the notes are on the fret board etc. I just want to be able to know more theory. I dont want to play a chord progression and have to wait minutes before I know what key it is in and then put scales to it. I want more fluidity to my play if you get me


Go buy Keith Wyatt et al's "Harmony and Theory."

Or, rather, do that if your ear is good. If your ear isn't great yet (and I'm guessing from the question that it's only so so) buy the same author's "Ear Training" first. You'll learn a lot of theory from that book.

Ultimately, this is really an EAR question, not a theory question, because there's no one right answer. The simple truth is that you have a choice of of scales for any given chord progression, and it's about knowing which one will create the sound that you hear in your head.

To take a really simple example, let's say you're playing over the chord progression A, D, E.

Well, that's pretty clearly A Major, right?
But you could also play A Minor Pentatonic over it, right? Actually, you can play the whole minor over it, if you use care about to avoid (or use) certain dissonances.

The relative minor of A major is F# minor. So here's the question - what happens if you play F# major over that chord progression? Does it work? Kinda - although it can be tricky.

The Musician's Institute Books (I'm a big fan of their stuff, btw) "Guitar Soloing" and "Advanced Guitar Soloing" ultimately build towards this question: "Given a chord progression, what can you play over it?" but recognize that it's a very complex subject and that there isn't only one answer to it.

But you'll get lost trying to answer this question if you're learning theory ahead of your ear. Music isn't about patterns on the fretboard, it's about sounds.