#1
Hello ultimate guitar community!

Well, I have a somewhat respectable home studio set up, and I'm starting to help some good friends produce some of their work on file in the best of my abilities. I'm a first hand musician, but producing (more so) and sound engineering are two strong hobbies of mine.
My friend is a guitar trying to get some recordings done at my place, and as his sound engineer in my lab, I have to help him with whatever sound he wants.
And I'm trying to achieve the best sound possible (as a engineer, you tend to become a perfectionist)
And the way he described the sound he wanted was "distorted (I'm ASSUMING he meant overdriven) yet clean." and with a warm sound. And after mixing in with my Peavey Valveking, Pedals, and Pod Farm 2.0 (which I despise using because of all the fake sounds it tries to emulate)
I have found potential sounds, but not really the perfect one.
And I want to know whats the best way to achieve this sound. It sound be a sound with a hint of distortion, but not enough to turn his suspended and towering chords (uses 7ths and 9ths in his progressions) to turn muddy and ruin their harmonic value.
I was thinking dual tracks (maybe one clean and overdriven), or maybe just find the sound in my pedals or amp or maybe even pod farm.
I have overdrive and distortion pedals, (pretty decent ones), and a great guitar (ESP-EC1000). What settings should I use, what kind of outline should I go about to achieve this sound, should I mic my amp (with condensers) or record through my audio interface, or should I stay with the potential sounds and tweak it in post production?
#2
Power amp distortion. Crank the master on the valve king and mic it.
#3
If the dude was trying to tell you that he wants a tone that cleans up when you play quietly and gets gritty as soon as you start punishing the strings, then consider some overdrive instead of high gain amp channels or distortion pedals, because a decent OD will help you achieve just that (especially if you add some reverb to mask the gainy nature of the tone) -> just have the dude play something "quiet" (by which I mean single note stuff which he plays with his fingers or a very soft pick attack) while you tinker with the gain. When he's happy, have him play a few power chords and see if he's still satisfied

If you find the difference in tone to be too drastic when switching playing styles, you could try toning down the signal that goes into your amp. If the guitar in question has crappy pickups/volume pots you could try adding a volume pedal which'll help you achieve the same effect (without getting noisy). I'm not that good with pedal board configurations and stuff, so I wouldn't be able to tell you where to place an od pedal, if you're even planning on using one that is...

/] 三方 [\
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Last edited by shwilly at Aug 7, 2011,
#4
A Tubescreamer is what you need for the sound if you just want a bit of distortion. Get the sound you want minus the hint of distortion and use the tubescreamer. If you don't have one download the TSE808 plugin. And throw that in on your DAW after you record the track and adjust as needed.

If your using the 808 plugin though after recording you have to be careful with how you use it or you are going to ruin your sound.
Last edited by FireHawk at Aug 7, 2011,
#6
I dont know many perfectionist who ask for help or seek the result from others...But anyway, the guitarist should know how to do it. Or you should try everything yourself to get the tone, that way you LEARN how to be a good engineer. Its like a mathmetician google-ing equation forumulae instead of working them out.
Always waiting for that bit of inspiration.
#7
Quote by W4T3V3R
I dont know many perfectionist who ask for help or seek the result from others...But anyway, the guitarist should know how to do it. Or you should try everything yourself to get the tone, that way you LEARN how to be a good engineer. Its like a mathmetician google-ing equation forumulae instead of working them out.


I'm asking for whats the best way to go about this, not really for the answer. I'm not a sound engineer, its a hobby.
#8
Quote by shwilly
If the dude was trying to tell you that he wants a tone that cleans up when you play quietly and gets gritty as soon as you start punishing the strings, then consider some overdrive instead of high gain amp channels or distortion pedals, because a decent OD will help you achieve just that (especially if you add some reverb to mask the gainy nature of the tone) -> just have the dude play something "quiet" (by which I mean single note stuff which he plays with his fingers or a very soft pick attack) while you tinker with the gain. When he's happy, have him play a few power chords and see if he's still satisfied

If you find the difference in tone to be too drastic when switching playing styles, you could try toning down the signal that goes into your amp. If the guitar in question has crappy pickups/volume pots you could try adding a volume pedal which'll help you achieve the same effect (without getting noisy). I'm not that good with pedal board configurations and stuff, so I wouldn't be able to tell you where to place an od pedal, if you're even planning on using one that is...


You explained yourself very well, and brought in some new ideas and techniques that I think will work nicely, much appreciated. I'm prolly going to go with the natural tube overdrive of my Peavey VK, but should I set it up digitally through my audio interface, or just mic my amp?
#9
Quote by FireHawk
A Tubescreamer is what you need for the sound if you just want a bit of distortion. Get the sound you want minus the hint of distortion and use the tubescreamer. If you don't have one download the TSE808 plugin. And throw that in on your DAW after you record the track and adjust as needed.

If your using the 808 plugin though after recording you have to be careful with how you use it or you are going to ruin your sound.


Definitely gonna check out that plug in, I'm not looking in to buying a pedal for this job that I'm not getting paid for. But I think that my tubes natural Overdrive will produce a much better sound than a digital plug in to be honest.
#10
Quote by hoodsarmy
But I think that my tubes natural Overdrive will produce a much better sound than a digital plug in to be honest.


Not doubt but you can use the digital plug underneath the recording. Not as a standout effect just to add slightly to the distortion. The truth is digital used at low levels can shape a sound with out messing with overall tone to much (compared to analogue).

I don't think this is debatable not matter how you feel analogue vs. digital. Digital is more transparent when used sparingly.

I hope that makes sense cause I don't really know how to put in words exactly what I mean.
#11
I know exactly what this guy wants. He wants to play let ring dissonant riffs.

Distortion ( half gain ) + flanger

( 0 delay , 0 reverb )


EDIT : NEVER MIND, reread your original post, that's not it
The symphonizer
Last edited by Sympho at Aug 7, 2011,
#12
What genre? What kind of music? This will help 10 fold.
I've bought, sold, and traded more gear than I care to admit.
#13
Quote by rob904
Power amp distortion. Crank the master on the valve king and mic it.


Do not crank a Valveking, the OT wont handle it, and it'll sound like a jagged death stabbing clean tone...

The best way I've found to get that kind of tone out of the Valveking, is get a TS9, set the TS9 to gain around 11 oclock, tone at 9 oclock, and level around 11 oclock as well.


Set the valvekings clean channel so it sounds extremely nice as a clean tone, set the texture control a little under 12 oclock, and have the volume around 3/10. Sounds the best imo.


The TS9 will add just the right amount of dirt to the signal, and it will retain the clarity of the cleans on the VK. I used this exact tone today with single coils in my worship band, and it sounded great.